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I'm getting bored of java.

It's more worth learning perl or a functional language (haskell)?

Comments
  • 1
    @AlpineLinnix what would you suggest?
  • 1
    @AlpineLinnix I'll give it a try, thank you!
  • 0
  • 2
    You could try Scala, functional programming language, works on the JVM but pretty different from Java, mastering Scala makes you way more efficient (that said, if you have to do a project running on the JVM)
  • 1
    Kotlin is my suggestion, definitely from a Java background. Haskell is worth learning as well but it's a completely different paradigm and it's unlikely you'll find a professional environment that uses it.
  • 1
    It doesn't matter what language you pick as long as said language has a strong community, in my opinion.
  • 1
    For functional I strongly recommend Elixir, I hate Haskell with a passion and find it to be unnecessarily annoying but Elixir is downright luxurious.
  • 2
    @woodworks what's better about Elixir over Haskell? I'm not well versed in functional languages.
  • 2
    @Nevoic I just started learning elixir... but I find elixir’s syntax a lot more pleasing than Haskell’s... elixir isn’t a completely functional language so transition is better too.
    Also, elixir has more market prominence than Haskell as far as I can tell.
    And the concurrency based model + the supervisor model of elixir is simply amazing!
    I reckon u will have a good time too with it...

    If you, however, wanna learn pure functional programming, Haskell is for u πŸ™‚
  • 1
    @Electrux is Elixir statically typed or dynamic?
  • 0
    @Nevoic it is dynamically typed
  • 0
    Kotlin/JavaScript+ framework(React/Angular/Vue) or Python(functionality)/C#(Unity maybe?)
  • 0
    Kotlin is really fucking awesome! But Scala isn't that bad too. But I'd definitely recommend Kotlin, tag me when you want more explanation on that.
  • 0
    @systemctl well, I actually started using kotlin after google announced to make it available on Android.

    I stopped learning it when I asked my teachers if I could do a project in kotlin instead of java and thez rejected it saying "what is Kotlin? We don't know it so you have to do zour work in java"
  • 1
    To learn functional I would recommend Haskell actually because its stubbornigly functional, they really really force you to write pure functions and that forces you to think in functional terms.

    After that you can pretty much have an easy time learning others. :)
  • 1
    @Nevoic what @Electrux said! Also worth mentioning IO is soooo much more painless in Elixir (Haskell can gtfo with complicated monads), and Elixir, in my opinion, has a much more vibrant open source community. Hex package manager is like NPM but good, and there's so much support for building large scale applications.

    e.g. If you want to do web dev, you can use Phoenix in Elixir which is wayyy faster for routing than node and much simpler/painless than the excessive web setup you have with Haskell's packages.

    If you're super turned off by dynamic typing, that's not a total given in Elixir. While generally Elixir/Erlang programming tends towards dynamic, there's strict type checks between primitive types (e.g. you can't concatenate string and int) and you can define typespecs on functions in Haskell-esque syntax. For fully static typing check out Elchemy--it's static typing for Elixir in Elm-like syntax.
  • 1
    @woodworks since u seem to know about elixir ( no sarcasm ), I was wondering... can u make complete websites using Phoenix framework?
    I was thinking about making me a website ( personal/blog )... was ruminating if Jekyll would be better or elixir ( I would prefer to make in elixir though if I can ) πŸ™‚
  • 1
    @Electrux anything static, for dynamic content I guess you technically could build a CMS although I've never tried it. For blog engines I made one when I started out using embedded elixir and templating (those eex files).

    In the past I've used Changelog CMS but that's quite heavy. You can also use any frontend framework (i.e. Vue) with Phoenix.
  • 0
    @woodworks well, so the answer is - I can make it in elixir! Great!! That way I accomplish two goals simultaneously!
    Thank you very much ☺️
  • 1
    @woodworks It's awesome to know that elixir has a static type checking solution, but I prefer those things native to the language so people don't have the option of doing dynamic typing (I'm a pretty defensive coder).

    It seems like Elchemy would be pretty similar to Typescript for Javascript, am I wrong in assuming that?
  • 0
    @Hu-bot0x58 @AlpineLinnix correct me if I'm wrong, but Rust is a systems programming language, right?

    It's mainly used as a replacement for C or other lower level languages. "Zero cost abstractions" is the mantra of that language, and performance is of top priority.
  • 0
    @Nevoic yeah analogous to Typescript, I prefer optional mostly so that I can prototype fast and then go back and add typespecs and make everything robust :3
  • 0
    @woodworks in my experience having statically defined types even in a prototype doesn't slow you down, unless the limiting factor is typing speed (which it never is in my experience).
    Granted, I type 145 WPM so maybe it doesn't effect me like it does some, but I've been under the impression that even slow typers need to stop and think about what's going on.
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