25
Bitwise
9d

I really wish I had a great mentoring experience :(

I have had to learn programming completely on my own. Even to this day if I don't know something I have to hit the books to figure it out myself.

I would absolutely love to find a mentor who would show me the ways of the force.

But it does not look to be in the cards :(

So I will continue to learn and excel on my own.

Comments
  • 6
    Yea it sucks but learning from non-living things has its benefits as well. It just takes a bit of extra time.
  • 5
    @cursee

    Yes, it does, but really, you can only get the really refined, industry standard, coding methods from a good mentor.

    I would love to have even code review to understand where I can improve. I guess that is what I need most lol.
  • 2
    To be fair, learning off your own back gives a more rewarding feeling than that of being spoon fed by someone else ;)
    Push through and do not give up.
  • 4
    I can totally relate to this. I was reading the rants this week and suddenly realized I don't have any great mentoring experience to share as well.

    I learned a lot observing other developers when working with teams, and also books, courses, etc. But that is a probably more time consuming and exhausting way to improve.

    But anyway, we are improving, and that's what matters.
  • 1
    if you learned programming on your own, then you found the mentor in yourself.

    because all a good programming mentor will do is teach you how to learn by yourself.
  • 2
    @Midnigh-shcode this.
    However it is good once you get a flow to run past people who get paid to do it as a day job ;)
    I taught myself C# and some java for automation mobile testing (appium etc), my version 1 regression scripts could be 3000 / 5000 lines long.... (LOTS of logging/reporting more than the controlling logic) and after speaking with a coworker/friend who is a dev I manage to get that down to <1000 lines with the same result.
    It's all about trial and error and what I find is the hours and hours spent debugging can teach you so much even if it's a simple missing , or ;.....
    It's all fun stuff like one big game
  • 1
    I feel you, it's hard, especially if you're really extraverted and could use someone experienced to talk about your ideas with and get feedback, advice and guidance
  • 6
    Actually imo I love it, to learn on my own. Sometimes I wish anyone would've teached me, but it's kind of a motivation for you to improve yourselfs :)
  • 0
    @hugh-mungus

    Agreed, I would absolutely love to be able to run ideas or ask for someone to review my code to see if they can think of how to make it better.

    I think people get wrong idea about my comment, I don't want to be spoon fed information, but lets face it, books don't teach you proper code etiquette and techniques.

    I can figure out almost all logic, but doesn't mean my code is best way to do it.

    Someone may show me a better way to parse an array say. Or how to code javascript in an OO manner with initialization and objects versus my (I feel) totally remedial way of doing it.

    I think to progress from intermediate programmer to advanced you need to be on a very good team, I am not sure if you can do it alone to be honest.

    I feel as if I have plateaued in my abilities and I am trying to figure out a way to move beyond the plateau and I think if I joined a very advanced team I could do that. Not entirely sure there is another way.
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