129
ewpratten
259d

It might look ugly, but after 4 years, I can finally use linux on my chromebook without having to hack around the firmware and os.

Comments
  • 5
    I'm still waiting :(
  • 10
    Thats why i hated chromebooks. The limitatios are just too much for me. But hey you can now compile linux on it.
  • 7
    ...why not just get a lower end Windows laptop or something and put Linux on that?
  • 2
    By Linux, doesn't it actually mean GNU userspace?
  • 4
    @kenogo it's based on the Linux kernel but I don't think it's actually a Linux distro. Chromium OS (the open source one) is, I think
  • 2
    @mjones44 I've read somewhere is based on Gentoo, "behind the scene".
  • 1
    What can we say... You've been using a ChromeBook for 4 years
  • 6
    I thought they ran Linux under the hood all along.. expected it to be possible to run gcc and make on that no problem. Kinda disheartening to see that Google locked it down so much "to protect users against themselves". Chromebooks should really be able to do more than running ChromeOS and Crouton already.
  • 6
    @kenogo "but the users might fuck up and end up nuking their machine"

    Engineers should understand already that sometimes it's okay to put a warning on a label rather than locking down the system to prevent them from doing the wrong thing, while also preventing them from doing a useful thing along the way. I've been guilty of this myself more than once, but it's something that should really be avoided.
  • 2
    @kenogo it is. But this is containers on top of a VM inside chromeos.
  • 1
  • 2
    @Condor it is Linux, and you can do all the normal Linux things. It's just that most of the filesystem is hardware write protected.
  • 1
    @kenogo you can run elfs. It's just a bit limited due to rootfs
  • 1
    @ewpratten I don't think it's hardware write protected. You can enter recovery mode and install anything on it that supports your chipset.
  • 1
    @taigrr it's hardware on some devices

    In mine, I have to load custom firmware to disable the lock.
  • 1
    @ewpratten fair enough
  • 0
    Chromebooks are for casual usage. Devs should buy any other laptop and install their distro of choice.
  • 2
    @620hun my distro of choice is chromeos.
  • 2
    @620hun I use my Chromebook as a thin client to a vps for development. It's awesome. Really long battery life, good keyboard, and it fits in my messenger bag.
  • 1
    @taigrr ya. I like the size. And nothing beats the r11 keyboard.
  • 0
    @ewpratten not even my r13 keyboard? 😁
  • 2
    @taigrr ok.. r13 has always been better.

    Still, those two are by far the best Chromebooks until the pixel book.
  • 0
    How did you get that?
  • 1
    @858master if your device supports crostini, you can do it that way, if not, crouton works great (or better), or you can go the native way and install Debian packages directly on to chromeos.
  • 0
    @kenogo Chrome OS is just as much Linux as Android is. Like @mjones44 said. It's build on the Linux kernel.
  • 1
    @kenogo it is technically Gentoo based. But very locked down because Chromebooks are designed to be as secure as possible.
  • 1
    Congrats man. Linux is never ugly 👌
  • 1
    I've been dealing with crouton since the first time i work with chromebook to this day. Man sometimes I just miss a working laptop with arch in it.
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