3
tnuhb
11d

I can't decide if I want to spend the money for a MacBook. At my last job I did mobile dev for about 9 months and I want to do side projects but don't want to limit myself to android. Plus I prefer iOS development over android. Not to mention I enjoyed using a MacBook a lot since it's derived from Unix (or BSD, whatever)... Any macbook users here who can help me justify the price tag?

Comments
  • 6
    You cant justify that price tag unless you're doing apple related development.

    You can get similar (often better) hardware for a fraction of the cost. Install Linux if you love the terminal.

    Not hating on apple, I'm hating on the fact that it's a status symbol for people with money, or a status symbol for devs.

    TLDR, if you REALLY want to do iOS development, there's the only justification you can get.
  • 5
    I plan to throw away some cash for a MacBook Air this year, only because I've never used one before and I can afford one every paycheck so I think @steaksauce is right. You can't justify the price tag unless you really want to get into iOS development, otherwise it's a "because I want to" and "because I can" kind of situation.

    Maybe other developers can provide more reasons..
  • 3
    I can decide: don't.
  • 7
    I think it depends on what your expectations are.

    Macbooks are expensive as fuck but they come with insanely pretty screens and powerful hardware.
    They are not upgradable though, so make sure you pick the right model.
    My boss is really happy with one of the newer ones, while some previous models suck shit.

    I know some people that don't mind spending time on learning linux, which is very necessary to undo fuckups or even install properly.
    Some distros are way easier than others, but sooner or later you'll have put in some time to make something work.

    Macbooks OTOH are very stable (which is reasonable since they own the hardware).

    Linux does provide a lot more control though (since macbooks kind of blackbox the users), and the experience can be very educational.

    Such amount of control is what makes me prefer linux.

    Finally some apps are not available on linux, for example Photoshop, with its best linux replacement is gimp, which is usually considered as way inferior.
  • 2
    Going from windows to a unix based os is definitely an upgrade in terms of developer expertise, since unix is a lot better for developers in my strong opinion..

    And going from Windows to MacOS is definitely a smoother ride than going from Windows to Linux.

    I alternated between both for the past 4 years, now using Manjaro.
  • 0
    @erandria I've used Linux in the past so not too concerned about the transition. I do agree that Linux can be more finely tuned to how you want it if you put in the time. Where as Mac is pretty much good to go out of the box, aside from a couple small things. I've been thinking about adding a Linux partition on my home PC just to get back into it. Maybe that's the route to go for now...later on if iOS development is still crawling around in my head I can invest then.
  • 0
    @tnuhb oh, my apologies for assuming you didn't use linux before, I misread it.
  • 1
    @erandria no worries....the thing with Linux too is that there are so many distros
  • 1
    @tnuhb so true... I just pick whatever is popular at distro watch...
  • 4
    The price tag seems reasonable when compare lifespan of mbp with others.

    PC friends usually buy a new laptop every 2 or 3 years.
    for comparison i used my 2011 mbp until 2017, that’s 6 years and it’s still pretty usable .. the only reason i bought a new one was to have a 15” retina display. I plan for it to last until 2024 or so, you can do the math :)

    BUT you really need to choose the perfect one as other stated, it’s not updatable.
  • 5
    I've been alternating between Windows and Linux (Slackware), and after my last hardware died, I tried Mac. Since 2014, I've been using a MacBook and I never had any issues with it. I only restart it during updates.

    macOS is optimized for Apple hardware which means you don't need to spend countless hours configuring stuff. While it's fun (and at times frustrating) fiddling with the OS (referring to Linux), most of the time you just want to get things done and not fight with your machine.

    If you want a selling point, then I guess it's the reliability of their hardware and software.

    For cross-platform development, being on a Mac could be an advantage, e.g.:

    1. develop using .Net, targeting the other OSes, or

    2. if you want to develop natively, just launch Linux or Windows on a VM.

    On the contrary, if you were, say, on a Windows, you can't really develop native software for macOS without either breaking the EULA or paying extra for 3rd party services or software.
  • 2
    @oreru thing is, I don't know what the "perfect" one would be. I was planning on mbp 15" 32gb ram and 1tb SSD...
  • 1
    @tnuhb well that’s a good one!

    only advice i’d have would be taking the upper model with dedicated graphic card.
    it’s globally a better hardware, and used to have better GL support (you never know)
  • 4
    If you *need* to develop iOS applications, you should either set up Hackintosh on a virtual machine or buy a Mac and use it just for that purpose (because for everything else you can use a proper computer).
  • 2
    @BlueDav000 I don't get the hate with Macs though. Genuinely asking, what is a proper computer?
  • 1
    I bought my first MacBook last year and have regretted it yet. I think it’s very easy to justify the cost.

    If you bought a windows pc and then a mac with the same specs yes the Mac costs more but once you add in the cost of all the software, and software subscriptions you need to buy on a PC you’ll pay the same price most times more over a few years/life if the laptop as your MacBook, for things that came on the MacBook to begin with and are arguably more powerful.

    I’ve been buying windows PCs for 15 years and just figured this out myself.
  • 2
    I bought my MBP last year and to be honest I am very disappointed now.

    There hardware is very good and I love the keyboard and the mousepad but my MacBook has a great problem. Because of that the keyboard becomes very hot to this point where I can not use it anymore. I asked the support for help but they replied to me that I do not use software from Apple so it is my problem...
  • 0
    @swisspencilcase A proper computer is one you actually own.

    Granted, there are still many proprietary components on an "ordinary" PC, but at least you can replace/upgrade almost anything.
  • 1
    @Killerkillyou "Your car overheats? That's because you drive it on ordinary roads, you have to drive it on special linear roads made specifically for your car. *

    * Road not included with the purchase."
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