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Never trust a fresh manufacturer Windows 10 install. Always create your own ISO and install that

Comments
  • 9
    Recently read an article about how "oem-installed software and apps may be making devices more vulnerable." Like no shit, we've known that for years.
  • 2
    @tokumei Yeah, haha. I just did a reset on a Windows 10 laptop and out of the box came all fucked up. Needed to get new install media
  • 4
    Bloat boat bloat!
  • 2
    I believe they even have a service at MediaMarkt or BCC that basically gets rid of all the bloatware on a normal machine. Luckily I use Linux nowadays
  • 0
    @alexbrooklyn don't need to use linux, just make a clean install of windows, first thing i do everytime i buy a new pc... On the other hand with android it's not possible/easy
  • 0
    That's what I did on my laptop.
  • 1
    When has it ever been advisable to use a preinstalled instance of Windows? For most people though, the choice to get a non-bloated fresh install is not available, as it would require paying for a new license, or downloading an illicit copy and dealing with all the technical and legal challenges with it. Neither scenario is attractive to the average user.

    This means that the vast majority of Windows users for home or personal use deal with a compromised experience. It's no wonder Windows use is falling off sharply outside gaming and corporate cases.
  • 5
    @bahua
    That’s not correct in the slightest. Microsoft has been very good in the past couple years at providing their installation media publicly, free of the manufacturer bloatware.

    If you search “Windows {version} ISO” they provide a legitimate ISO to burn, with Windows 10 having an upgrade utility. The ISOs are always barebones as Microsoft defines it, and they provide downloads for 7, 8.1, and 10. I reinstalled Windows 10 with the upgrade utility last night, no external media required, and it gave a barebones install of Windows 10 free of the MSI bloat.
  • 0
    @bahua what? No such thing such as a new license was needed on my laptop.
  • 1
    Or just replace the os with MX Linux
  • 2
    Yep, if you have a recent laptop model (UEFI in particular) that came installed with Windows, most likely the product key is encoded in a section of the ROM, forever available for fresh reinstalls.

    I personally dont use it on the system itself as I prefer Linux for several reasons, but if I ever need to make a Windows VM, I believe that key has worked for that in the past.
  • 1
    @jschmold now you can do it also from settings, and few rare laptops cone with a clean windows install, called signature if I'm not wrong... I saw "ibstall linux" comments already started
  • 0
    @jschmold

    In the past couple years, sure. Now that they've already lost the desktop market share they once had. Too little, too late.
  • 0
    @bahua yeah they really lost a lot of desktop market share /s
  • 0
    @dontbeevil

    Yes. That's correct.
  • 0
  • 0
    That's nonsense. Android and iOS both outnumber Windows installs by wide margins. But even not counting those, Windows has lost ground even in the too recent sample you've provided, and all others have gained.
  • 0
    ...and I'm not interested in the fact that you use Windows or that I don't. We are not normal consumers. My wife, for example, had a Windows laptop ten years ago, replaced it for a couple years with a Mac, but today she uses neither, as all her computing needs are met by her mobile device. Her case is not at all unique. General purpose computing has given way in an almost exact proportion to the gains of mobile use, but of the general purpose population, only Windows has seen dramatic losses.
  • 0
    @bahua
    I caution that it is possible your biases are interfering with your reasoning skills. Though Microsoft by my estimation has lost ground, I wouldn’t be so quick to assume they’ve lost so much ground that it’s extraordinarily obvious. They are the number 1 enterprise OS in the world, servers aside
  • 0
    @bahua
    You do make a wonderful point about mobile devices. Android and iOS have made splendid strides across the board, to the point where we are on the cusp of universal mobile devices, where a mere dock can transform a phone into a desktop computer. Razer already has
  • 0
    @jschmold

    Yes, among users who have no choice, Windows is still the de facto desktop. I have said that before-- in this thread, even.
  • 1
    @bahua
    Loosely you have said that, yes 😉. I believe I understand your perspective, and agree.

    Manufacturer installs have always been unreliable, Microsoft has a bad reputation for being a pain and it has affected their market share, and that mobile devices have also contributed to a dip in market share. We as programmers/enthusiasts are non-standard users, thus our perspective is a bit off compared to what the norm actually is.

    My only point of disagreement was that the manner in which you expressed it all made it difficult to tell if your analysis was objective or subjective. ☺️
  • 0
    @bahua first you were talking about desktop market share and i provided you the fact that's more or less stable in +/- 2% ... than you start to talk about ios and android, in this case we're not talking about desktop anymore, and we have to consider the fact that most people doesn't need a pc for facebook, instagram, angry birds ecc...

    but still is the second OS overall

    https://netmarketshare.com/operatin...
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