11
M1sf3t
20d

Find a motherf'ng job... 🙄

Also maybe finally play fallout 4 🤞🏼

Comments
  • 1
    You lost me at fallout
  • 3
    @Bubbles everyone is entitled to their own wrong opinions about fallout 4.
  • 2
    Working is overrated. I'd rather be at home in bed right now.
  • 1
    Find a job at Fallout 4!
  • 1
    @Bubbles shut the hell your mouth.

    @CaptainRant That is the dream. To work at obsidian at least. Bethesda never strings the story together enough for me. I'm so far behind on modern gaming though, they wouldn't even pay me to sweep the floor at either.
  • 0
    @delegate212 you know i was kinda thinking about gettin one of them there remote jobs where I can just work from bed. Just leaving the house is overrated these days 🙄
  • 2
    @M1sf3t Yes, modern gaming came to have an inverse-proportionate evolutionary trend, where it at the same time has gotten more complex while often being a string-a-long.
    For example, I enjoy turning off the 'go here/do this' pointer arrows and all the hints in Far Cry 4, then just old school looking at the map like the olden days and having to rely on my own navigational instincts.

    The complexity of games has gotten maddening. We've come from managing a simple 2D-coordinate system, to moving on to voxels, dynamic lighting, Direct3D, physics, collision hell, etc. Not long ago I applied to such a company but I wasn't hired due to lack of experience, but my knowledge was there. Nonetheless, even if you work on a small part of their code infrastructure, it's still complex as hell. You have to have a very creative mind and be great at problem-solving.

    I'd say get yourself as far as you can, get yourself updated and then apply. I'm updating my knowledge too at the moment.
  • 1
    I think that might be the direction I go once I finally secure a steady income. I fell into web development by accident, I've been focused on trying to catch up on on there is to a frontend job since that seemed like the shortest means to an end. I'm not sure I really plan on staying in that role for very long though. So far when trying to build demo projects I've been favoring animations and small 2d games over trying to build traditional mobile friendly web apps.
  • 1
    @Bubbles bruh seriously? I mean it's still early to really give it a full review but this survival mode is sick. It's been nearly a week and I haven't even made it to level 10 yet.
  • 0
    @M1sf3t what are we talkin about
  • 0
    @Bubbles i finally got it downloaded and working with proton
  • 0
    Well I did by the morning of the second. The game may or may not be the reason Ive been mia the past few days 🙄
  • 0
    @M1sf3t I’m very confused
  • 0
    @Bubbles Fo4, trying to understand what you didn't like after I finally got a chance to play it. Not that you seem to be in the minority with that opinion, just having a hard time imagining why unless most were just expecting another call of duty.
  • 0
    @M1sf3t it’s just not as well made and It didn’t really feel fun or like fallout to me, and I stopped liking Bethesda after Skyrim released. I wish iD wasn’t owned by them and were under a better company
  • 1
    Take it from someone who spent 3 years full time at game dev.

    Bring at least a years worth of income.

    Prepare to spend more than half of it paying your wages as you talk to people and market, instead of actually developing.

    Don't expect groups like Indie Fund to fund you.

    Finally, above all, make lots and lots of demos, focusing on fun, and show no one unless you're sure it's 1. fun, and/or 2. LOOKS pretty and polished.

    People can and will judge it based on screen shots alone.

    This isn't meant to discourage you by any means. But it's a massive undertaking, most people going into the industry are *completely* unprepared for the difficulty CLIFF involved in 1. shipping, 2. marketing, 3. timing the marketing, 4. actually gaining traction from marketing, 5. managing their nerves on a hit-or-miss oversaturated market with too many gatekeepers combine with too many reasonable, if not innovate, competitors.

    Whole industry is a crapshoot, even compared to 2016
  • 2
    @Bubbles yea I've been saying that since they made 3. Still, after over a decade has past, I can't say that I've saw any other company that would've done any better. Especially after seeing how far they've taken it with four.

    It does look like some of obsidian's influence rubbed off from new vegas. A lot of things that were sorta haphazardly thrown in half-developed got their full attention this time around. Like the survival mode, it completely changes the way you have to play the game now.

    Still kinda quirky of course and the storylines seem to be back to being completely independent from one another, but I think some of that is to be expected when taking on a project that massive.
  • 2
    @M1sf3t Bethesda is the on my top worst game dev list personally so I typically don’t talk a lot about their games
  • 1
    @Wisecrack I won't be going into it expecting any income. I've got a few different trades under my belt already, i get comfortable enough with web dev to start contracting freelance, games will just be something I do for fun when things are slow or I just need a change of pace.

    Figure I might start with fallout mods to get my feet wet. I come up with the story for one set in the south a few years ago, should be too hard to pull off now that there's a miami one. I haven't saw it yet but I suspect they've already come up with irradiated crocs that I modify to look like gators and the mosquitoes and pack braman came with 4. All I gotta do now is flood the streets of nola, add some flatbottom boats, reactivate the volcano in jackson and add some nazi pows.
  • 1
    @Bubbles i like their crafting elements mostly. Others have tried it but they always fall short of making it feel like your really scavenging as opposed to just grabbing everything you see because its all guaranteed to have a purpose and you have no carry weight anyway.
  • 1
    @M1sf3t

    Worked on something in a similar setting.

    Played way too much neo scavenger.
  • 1
    @Wisecrack that looks like something i could get into. 3D is nice but somewhat overrated when it comes to actual gameplay. Especially when it's the same animations over and over a again.

    I always said I wanted to do a fighting game that didnt rely on pre-scripted button combos. Give the sprites arms and legs a pattern of movement that's based on that character's fighting style but any attack could be chained together, relying on the timing of when each button is pressed and released, then maybe the character's overall balance stat or something.
  • 0
    @M1sf3t

    Mechanics are a cool study. Important thing is giving the player tradeoffs.

    When designing a trick I used is to imagine yourself as a player writing an FAQ or walkthrough. What are the pitfalls? What are the losing strategies? Now what are the winning strategies? Whats the best way to play and the tradeoffs you have to make?

    Take Skyrim for example. Inventory management really is it's own minigame.

    You're constantly making decisions about what to carry and what to lose. A miniguide on that mechanic might be "You'll try and carry everything initially but realize large armor, though 'valuable' in an absolute sense, isn't worth it for the weight it takes up and should drop it. Grab xyz items in this area." etc.

    Players like discovering optimal play, and decisions with tradeoffs are what make it fun to discover. There are other types of fun of course, but thats just one example.
  • 1
    @Wisecrack thanks, I'll be sure to keep in mind. I'm gonna need all the help I can get in order to stay outa the weeds. I have a tendency to get hung up on the minute details that noone else ever seems to care about.

    Like in fallout how there's so very little depth perception and you can't arc your toss around anything so odds of you hitting yourself with a maltov are just as good as you hitting anyone else. Like seriously no one has that bad of an arm that their going to hit the corner of the wall directly in front if them.

    Or this ability to lean in either direction to shoot from a corner that seems to be getting adopted by all shooters. In real life you'd have to swap hands and shoot less accurately on one side or risk exposing your body a lot more than you wanted to.
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