10
taher
87d

C/C++ devs need to learn Rust
Python devs need to learn Nim
Ruby devs need to learn Crystal
JS devs need to learn Typescript

Also bunch of other stuff like webassembly, native add-ons, machine learning and whatnot.

Too much to learn, to little time if you are a dev who has to learn them all.

Comments
  • 2
    Never heard of Nim
  • 2
    @Benutzername it's a new shiny language. https://nim-lang.org/
  • 7
    why? I get learning new stuff, but why? none of those with the exception of TS can really replace the others.
  • 2
    @AleCx04 because the business guys likes to use buzzwords and rust had been most loved language in stackoverflow for last 4 years. If you wanna keep your job, you gotta learn new stuff. 🤣
  • 3
    @entrptaher not really, if you want to keep your job you then learn the proper trending specs in terms of getting a job on the most stable market. At work we use a combination of Java, Node, PHP and Python (and we are starting Golang builds) as well as 3 different database engines. How many jobs available do you see for Rust compared to C or C++? or between Nim and Python, or between any of them and Java or the JVM as a whole? Heck I don't think Crystal is even out of Beta yet.
  • 4
    Hahaha thats funny. I'm still building dynamic pages with jquery. 🤣 *laughs in asp.net mvc 5*
  • 1
    @AleCx04 rust is super easy and being more popular for creating webassembly apps, I tried to do that in c++ and my brain hurt.

    Just because you don't see a job right now doesn't mean you won't need it. 😁

    All big companies are starting to use rust and wasm.

    Few years ago no one cared about typescript.
  • 0
    @Benutzername me too, I still use jQuery in many projects because they simply cannot be done in anything else. Some of the core jQuery features still doesn't have any replacements.
  • 2
    @entrptaher Not really, people are just lazy.
  • 4
    I am a C++ dev that is still learning the nuances of C++. I am plenty busy with that. I know there were people on the C++ committee that retired and in 6 months felt they were no longer qualified to be on the committee anymore. There is a LOT to the language.
  • 0
    @Demolishun totally true. Programming in any language is easy to learn but hard to master.
  • 1
    I love that the general trend tends to move from interpreted languages to compiled ones
  • 0
    @AleCx04 ngl i see a lot more rust jobs than cpp
  • 2
    @yellow-dog I don't, a quick search showed about 7172 for C++ development and for rust I got 340 something according to Indeed searches. While I know this is extremely biased and not generally descriptive I still don't see the appeal. C++ ain't Cobol, the language gets updated constantly and made easier to work with, I've got nothing against Rust really, but jumping ship and migrating to it thinking its a replacement for C or C++ seems rather far fetched. Even more for the other languages he described for which one ain't even stop being beta and the other has no way to replace Python for damn near everything Python does
  • 1
    @entrptaher where are you getting all this? what big companies are all moving to webassembly? Look man don't get me wrong, I share your enthusiasm for learning new stuff and I damn well know I take my fair shit in learning as many languages as I can, but calling these outs as if they were replacements to what is currently stable and constantly updated based on personal preference is just.....effy to say the least. And I have no clue where you get that no one cared about TypeScrip when it came out, people started applying that to everything they could as fast as they could, shit Google was one of the firsts to jump ship by making it available inside of Angular. "everybody" is a highly subjective quantifier for popularity or availability of a tool that you must learn
  • 1
    Nim reminds me a lot of Genie
  • 1
    @AleCx04 the rust book is written really well for someone like me who hasn't cut their teeth on language like that. Not only do they go into a lot of detail about the basic principles but you get comparison to both low and high level languages. Usually you only get one or the other, a detailed description of the language/framework's core or a general explanation of how it works compared to the more popular whatever that you might have came from (looking at you sapper 😕).
  • 1
    @AleCx04 that's what mean. People doesn't care about things when they are less popular.

    Typescript and Rust is taking all that hype right now similar to graphql, machine learning and web assembly. They are the shiny stuff according to some industry leaders, I'm just trying to stay updated.

    It's not a drop in replacement. I've got no intention of making anyone change their stack.

    You spent all that year to learn c++, you are far productive with that then a noob like me who got confused 😁 when seeing the stuff you have to type to get things done.

    I'm pretty sure you have far more experience than I do in those areas. I'm just trying to convince myself in a rant. 😅
  • 1
    @AleCx04 nim and Crystal is not a replacement, rather a refreshing experimental thing to play with. They are not mature enough. But their syntax should blow you away with their performance. 🤔 If you care about performance but with simple syntax.
  • 0
    @entrptaher you do have the right mindset man :) learning new things will make you improve more and more. Trust me, you will go back and look at the things that were hard originally and find them to be simple, it is all a learning experience.
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