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Is it worth for someone to learn Java nowadays. Though there are many new technologies that are trying (or taking over) some of the use cases of Java ( i said some for sure).

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    Modding minecraft comes to mind. It is used in a ton of places. So it is commercially relevant. I would look at the types of applications people build and see if that is what you want to do.
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    Absolutely. Corporate loves Java.
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    then why so many people saying java sucks balls
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    @molaram I learned it some months ago and it's too verbose. To do a task may take you days
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    @JosiasAurel isn't python the same?
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    @molaram no it's not. Python let's write code going direct to the point. Additionally, it's easy to learn but powerful. Just that it's interpreted language
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    @molaram because either people are too weak to learn Java properly or they just prefer more syntactic sugar. Or maybe duck typing. Or maybe people consider themselves above others if they are using a java derivate.

    Either be a kettle running along with a herd or stop for a moment and think what's what.
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    I always chuckle a little when people ask if the n 1 most used programming language in the world is a good language to learn. Your Ruby job might disappear, your JS job might turn to crap, that php agency might close down, but that JVM job, broski that shit is going to outlast your great great great grandchildren. You might call some of the features of Java in particular verbose, I call them self documenting. And it does not matter how long a project in Java is, on the long run it is easier to jump back in to where you started as compared to Python Flask or Node Express in which everyone and their mothers have a different way of doing things.
    Some tasks are pretty painful in Java, ain't gonna lie, I personally dislike parsing JSON in Java, but don't wonder about it man, even if you don't like Java there are about 50 other languages that run just fine in the JVM
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    if its so good then why are people trying to kill it
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    @molaram when we think about it we can find biased views on damn near every platform. Whereas some love Python you will find others that abhor it, where some people build stable and performant services with php there are others that still believe that its stuck in version 4, whereas JS has so much track and popularity there are people that wish it would never have left the client side scripting that it originally was planned for etc etc biases, some people's first intro to development was Java in uni, and they abhored it, there could be many factors, but a bad technology it is not, specially since it has evolved greatly. The same goes for every programming language or technology 🤷
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    The thing about java is, you can use it for small apps and then scale that small app until you are a google-size enterprise. Cant really do that with any other languages.
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    @yellow-dog that's serious
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    @yellow-dog What about golang, is python not worth ? And JavaScript (since the arrival of node)
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    @yellow-dog how do these other companies do it with other stacks?
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    @molaram your right. What about them 🤔🤔
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    @molaram I would rephrase what my boy said by "can't really do that with other languages painlessly", its possible, painful, but possible
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    so how come its so easy with java
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    I have no idea what youre asking
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    @molaram
    Facebook spent billions upconverting a php stack to c++ compiled extensions before formulating Hack.

    Amazon built a billion dollar service integration system (Brazil) and a compositing microfronted system that allows all the teams on amazon.com to ship features in whatever platform they want to, usually java with legacy c++, perl, etc.

    AWS is pretty much standardized on java for reasons previously stated. It's not that it's better as a language, it's the platform matured to have default support for that use case.

    The general answer is money, and usually more of it. Probably accomplishable in .net now as well.
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    @molaram java....easy your right and you have all rights but the use case matters. Java is good and additionally has built-in packages/libraries for almost anything
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    @SortOfTested yeah that's not a wonder to me talking about Java. What I like lost on it is probably it's cross platform ability
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    I just don't get what that language has that's so special. because scaling isn't exactly language specific.
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    @molaram that also is 👍. Scaling a project in a language is not more a problem with docker and kubernetes
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    was it not possible even before all this docker and kubernetes hype?
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    Is it that java has a well planned route for scaling versus having just the ability to scale?
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    @molaram sorry sir. But I mean whatever the case is those two people I mentioned not cool and easier ?
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    @molaram Because learning Java, and by that extension C# since they are very similar in a lot of concepts, normally involves learning design patterns. One of the things that messes people the most in Java is the fact that proper development practices are already standardized in common Java development because the language practically gives you no way around it. You could potentially put all of your(for example) web api code in a single Spring boot controller and it would be completely fine, or, you could properly generate pojos to have a representation of your data access layer, generate different service interfaces for the database(s) that you plan of using, extending and configuring their individual implementations, separating your controllers into different pieces, setting the configuration for your middlewares etc etc all in different files using proper OO design patterns to the point in which adding something to the app seems trivial.
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    @AleCx04 that sounds 💃. It was the first language I learned and don't regret but what made me mute it is it's verbosity when I saw python and myself doing what I was doing in java in like 10lines of code. But nonetheless i still revise it and try to maintain some hello world example . To that's extent it's still used
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    So why would you use java when you can do shit 10 times faster in python
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    @molaram with programming languages. I guess with your experience you know that some languages have use cases (cases where they fit best) it's same with java and python here
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    @molaram they dont. Most of their infrastructure is based on java, with modules in different languages. I know for a fact that google, amazon and spotify are like this, and its safe to assume more or less other multinationals are too. Its not really the language, its the maturity of the entire stack.

    Full disclosure, i dont know much about c#, so i cant exactly say if its better or worse for this purpose.

    Edit to address your last comment: you can do that in python, but i remember when i was freelancing in a team of 3 and we used python really often and usually after release, something broke (mostly because of the type system tbh) and we had to go back and figure out the entire app just to fix it. In java, generally if something breaks, its gonna break at complie or immediately after.
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    @molaram
    It's not, python is slower than java for long running ops under good frameworks. Python just has a fast startup time due to its jit nature.
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    @AleCx04
    Better to use record classes over pojos for that nowadays.
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    so then why doesn't everybody just use java and fuck all other languages
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    @molaram that's awesome question. But you know why
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    @JosiasAurel a lot of people say it sucks so maybe that's why?
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    @molaram maybe that's why. But you can only know more about something by trying it to understand. So the fact that's people say it doesn't mean it's true. People do say such things about other languages too. Depends on each's point of view
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    @JosiasAurel just trying to understand but I don't want to learn it in fact I don't even want to see it because its fucking ugly by my standards. And it's extremely difficult finding a good answer to these questions...other than personal bias or the fact that it's great for laundering piles of money, this last point might be a valid reason why large companies use it in some peoples' opinion.
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    @molaram ✋✋ that's a wonderful. For me what makes it so popular is its WORA (write once run anywhere) and it's stdlib it's certainly good alot of things. I wouldn't force someone to use it. It fits in many fields. It makes me sometimes reluctant because of the way it looks like but nonetheless, a language is a language. Think of COBOL that makes developers knowing it thousands of dollar per month even though it gives me headache. It's not that easy to understand the world and how/why things are the way they are but they are just like that 🤷🤷
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    @molaram whats not an ugly language in your opinion?

    Also when you are hating on java, i presume you are caught up with the majority of the past java 10 updates and arent just talking from experience of a 12 year old java6 tutorial, right?
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    @yellow-dog that's so funny 😅
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    @yellow-dog wow cowboy I never said i'm hating on java i just said it looks like shit. There's a difference. I don't hate horse shits I just don't play with them because I don't like the stench. I don't need to know what the horse ate in order to decide i don't like horse shit.
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    @molaram the difference between horse shit and java code is, you cant shit a horse but you can code a java

    Also the syntax is literally the c standard, do you not like 95% of the languages?
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    Is there a library for Java called "RoadApple"?
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    @yellow-dog naw bro i don't like 99% of the languages.
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    Think of how much production code out there is written in Java that will never be converted or updated, regardless of whether it would be the right choice. Even if Java died right now, there would still be Java developer jobs 100 years from now maintaining all the existing systems.

    I mean heck, in the US you can still find work as a COBOL programmer: https://cnn.com/2020/04/...
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    @jdebs yeah that gives me headache f*** COBOL
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    @JosiasAurel the same some will say about java in 20 years.
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    @twped If anything people will still be modding Minecraft with java is 20 years.
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    I don't get WORA, java runs on a VM, you need that VM on your remote control, no? with this logic if I put apache2 on that remote control i can code it in PHP, right?

    honestly asking, because they told me this in school, my friend a java developer tells me this all the time, but WORA for java makes zero sense to me
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    @webdev now that is a mfking good question. Think of Golang, if you compile a Golang application in one machine, say a windows machine, it will run on another windows machine since the language allows for such portability. Will that same executable binary run on a Linux machine? Well, no. It has to bee compiled to the system specs in order for this binary executable to work. Considering PHP in the example you provided, when you install apache on windows it works through .dlls which are particular to Windows machines, Linux on the other hand works differently on this regrard, thus not WORA necessarily albeit you could say that they aaaaaaaaallmost work alike in their respective server environments.
    Java gets touted with the WORA because you don't have to change anything on(at least not that I am aware of thus far in my career, y'all feel free to correct me if I am wrong) your application since they run on the JVM. You can; however, detect the host system from within a Java program.
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    Best way to dump her:

    “Sorry, I just wanted to have my cock sucked by a Java developer”
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    (That’s for the 45 minutes i wasted today trying to figure out why the fuck some shit app older than my right ball wasn’t picking up the JAVA_HOME var I was passing)
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