8

This is a true story :
I once downloaded a game compressed at 1kb..... When I decompressed it, THICC - It was 11Gb file 💯. Is that even normal or possible ? 🤕🤕

Comments
  • 10
    It is possible if your game is about counting 88 Billion zeros.
  • 2
  • 5
    Its possible with something like a zip bomb. You take a file at 1kb and you take a millionty billionty copies of this file and compress it down to ~1kb. The only additional data needed is how many times the file should be compressed. That's pretty much all I know about zip bombs, someone else can probably correct and/or extend.
  • 1
    I had the same thing! I have always wondered how that was even possible. For me it was Just Cause 2 zipped into 7MB and it was playable after unzipping. I have no clue if that's possible or not, but it worked :P
  • 4
    @Marl3x That kind of compression ratio is unrealistic unless we are talking about zip bombs here. What kind of game are you talking about here?
  • 2
    You got zipbombed. Sucker.
  • 2
    http://pouet.net/prod.php/...
    A 96kb game in full 3d with particles, lighting, normal maps, specular maps, inverse kinematic armature animations...

    You'd be surprised what you can compress
  • 3
    @Stormwah You can only compress redundancy.
  • 0
    Made one for school and put it on the exchange server lol
  • 5
    @Stormwah

    kkrieger is not really "compressed" -- there are no real conventional models, textures or sounds.

    As is common with scene demos, the whole thing is procedurally generated, it's basically a very complicated fractal of patterns. Everything is "modeled" on the fly, from code, from equations.

    OP's story that a tiny file somehow unzipped into a working copy of Just Cause 2 is dubious.

    You can write code to generate repetitive textures of wood and rusted metal from a few kb, and you don't need mp3 tracks to create synth/midi sounds -- but triple A games have actual dialogue, high poly count models and textures made from photographs.

    I have seen pirated 5MB version of The Sims 3, which consisted of a tiny torrent client which could unpack and install the game and all expansions before downloading was complete, much like modern MMO launchers do. Impressive, but it still pulled in data from elsewhere.
  • 0
    @Stormwah Not surprised actually, this is a scene demo type of program which has been coded most probably in assembly language to be as small as possible and generate all assets in-memory from algorithms.
    You don't see that in commercial games where assets for maps, textures, sound, etc have to be pre-built.
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