9
Farshad
54d

Am I a stupid for thinking Udemy and other similar certificates are trash?

Comments
  • 2
    Uh, no? I think they are pretty trash until they start to force you to build a "blog site" or whatevs.
  • 13
    Nope, they have 0 curation and peer review and will publish literally anything. They also do nothing to combat fake reviews. Being cautious is absolutely correct.
  • 4
    There as useful as the smudge of dirt on my shoes - they can fill a CV but they don't prove anything.
  • 0
    Am I stupid for pronouncing it as YU-dem-ee instead of oo-DEM-ee like my colleagues do?
  • 0
    @spongessuck I spell it like "c-r-a-p d-e-b-t o-n-l-i-n-e" (university/college online)
  • 1
    @spongessuck I pronounce it as You-Dem-Eye 🤷‍♂️
  • 1
    If I see Udemy on an experienced resume it goes straight to the bin.
  • 1
    What about Udacity? They seem to work closely with Google. Is it a spin-off of Udemy or is it actually decent?
  • 2
    @hjk101 it's boot camp style learning , most courses take months, instead of a few hours of video on udemy and bam "instant pro"
  • 1
    Currently yes, but that might change in the future depending on who's looking at them.
  • 1
    I don't understand the hate against a certificate itself. If the person has it on his resume it's just a reason to start asking harder questions on that subject and demand to see projects he created during the course. That filtres the people who got certificate+knowledge or just a certificate to boast on CV.

    Some of the courses are good, with hands on labs, etc... but it requires extensive filtering.
  • 3
    @qwwerty Its more of a first impression thing. For example, some Udemy azure certification (if that is a thing) wouldn't look as good as a proper MS Azure certification when the HR personell is handed a bunch of CV's they need to flip through.
  • 1
    @theuser you underestimate the stupidity of HR
  • 1
    @hashedram he certainly does.

    but if you have a official cert, then kudos and feel free to add it, if it's a 2 hour video and then you're certified, someone will glance and move on.
  • 0
    @theuser depends on a company i guess. We're doing CV reviews and interviews ourselves without HR intervening, because HR knows shit about what our team do, what we need and who would fit.

    @C0D4 You have cases where there is no "official certification authority" for a given technology and you can't tell which Udemy cert is the "2 hour video" and which one is "weeks long with projects and hands on labs" just from the CV.
  • 1
    @qwwerty true, there's always going to be times where a vendor cert doesn't exist, but fact checking should be taken into account if they "look the part" and have countless certificates listed.
  • 0
    I loaded up on a bunch of courses at like ten bucks a piece when they had a weekend sale, and it was worth every single penny ten times over.

    It depends what you are trying learn, really.

    If you do, I HIGHLY recommend Maximillian Schwartzmuller's (Academind) Javascript advanced masterclass, React Development, and Flutter courses. Angela Yu (London App Brewery) has 2 awesome courses, 1 for flutter and 1 for web development.. both of which are crazy good and in depth. For Python and Data science/machine learning I recommend Jose Portilla's classes. All three instructors are solid AF and it was enough to get me going to the point of becoming a fucking machine once I took the training wheels off!!!
  • 1
    Also, dropping 50 bucks on a few courses that has over 300hrs worth of lectures beats spending 100k on a bachelors degree to learn java or whatever at a snails pace.
  • 0
    @klutch surely contents are very useful but udemy certificates are another thing
  • 0
    @Farshad true! It's a nice morale booster though
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