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It continues to absolutely astonish me how many of my fellow Americans don’t get business property rights and the right to choose who you do business with. People continue to complain that not wearing a mask is their right (totally missing the point) but seem to have completely forgotten that when you’re on commercial property, the proprietor makes the rules and ultimately can decide you don’t get to be there and won’t be doing business with you. yes, I’m talking to you states rights and business rights people who have forgotten that is their standpoint because it’s convenient to posture about COVID-19 being a hoax. If you don’t want to wear a mask on an airplane or at Panera bread you can get the hell out because if the store tells you you have to then no, in fact you do not have the right to loiter in premesis and you do not have the right to force proprietors to do business with you. It has always been this way and this is not new. Your rights don’t trump the rights of others just because you think your guess at what is what is better than others.

My place of employment doesn’t want us on site working. Covid OR no Covid, that is their call.

Not taking a side on anything here except businesses rights to set ground rules and necessary conditions for patronage. Get with it and make our country proud. I’m tied of everyone calling us a failure after how much the us has accomplished. We’re not bad guys. Let’s prove it. Start by considering your countrymen in everything you do. We will stay strong by sticking together and having compassion for ourselves and the rest of the world.

IF not wearing a mask is your right then so is wearing them. It’s not harming our society to do it, so why not do so if there’s a chance it might help America stay competitive on an international scale? Do it for fellow Americans. Think of it as a sacrifice if you must but just do it. It costs you nothing in money or freedom.

Comments
  • 7
    It is unfortunate, but you can't use logic on such people.

    To everyone across the pond, hope you get your shit in order soon

    Good luck
  • 5
    Don’t get me wrong this fact is tough for me too. I don’t have a phone and a lot of businesses won’t work with you if you don’t give them a phone number. That means I’m severely discriminated against for my life choices. It’s infuriating, and it’s not fair, but it is what is. I do think forcing information out of people to do business is immoral and I hope regulations will change I (but I’m not holding my breath) but it is the same rule that allows you to refuse service to someone who is cussing at other customers and otherwise disrupting your business and that’s a good thing.
  • 2
    Some people also try to claim ADA and HIPAA (they write it as "HIPPA" 🙄) allow them to not wear masks because they made-up some disability.

    No, ADA specifically states that if something endangers others, it's not a reasonable accommodation for a disability. Curb pick-up or delivery are reasonable accomodations.

    (I'm not an American but I have some friends over there, so I picked up some legal info)
  • 4
    This has nothing to do with the pandemic though. The media is sustaining a feardemic. The point is destabilization and fearmongering. You cannot have logical discourse in that environment. There is also this nagging feeling that this pandemic is being used to destroy what freedoms are left. This is part of that feardemic. To me personally this feels like the coverup with 9-11. It has that same smell about it. Right smack in the middle is this realization that the media "is in on it, again". It is not logical.

    Logically if the scope of the pandemic is real then masks are a no brainer. You should be wearing them. On the other hand because of the distrust of the media and establishments you wonder how much of this pandemic is manufactured. That part is fear based whether there is any fact or not. So as long as the media/political parties keeping the feardemic going there will not be any logic at all.
  • 3
    @Demolishun

    > This has nothing to do with the pandemic though. The media is sustaining a feardemic

    In the media's defense, there is *a lot* of money in sustaining a feardemic. My inner capitalist smiles at such rewards from our 1st Amendment.

    My inner Libertarian is scared shit-less because of a socialist agenda (shhh...both parties are just different sides of the same coin) that will justify removing our freedoms for the sake of "safety" or some weird form of social justice.
  • 3
    @PaperTrail I know, the gun companies and medical companies are making bank off this. While everyone's retirement fund is being robbed by massive inflation.
  • 2
    @Demolishun

    > the gun companies and medical companies are making bank off this.

    Wait till after the election (won't really matter which one wins). You'll want to stock up on 45, 9mm, 223/556, etc because every NRA member will mortgage their house buying guns+ammo (conspiracy theory that BLM+Antifa will attempt a coup against Trump) or <insert most any Democrat> will pass a bill allowing forced confiscation of everyone's guns (you know, to keep us "safe"), which the side affect of that will be every NRA member mortgaging their house to buy guns+ammo and bury it in their backyard.

    Pretty sweet time to work in the self protection business right now. Not saying I work for such an organization, but if I did, its very likely I'll be able to buy a car with the profit sharing check we'll get at EOY and enough left over for McD drive thru. God bless America.
  • 4
    What I dislike most about all this though is the fucking mask wearers that come up and stand right fucking next to me. Its like they are retarded or something. Stay the hell away from me, mask or no mask. Stupid fuckers.
  • 1
    @PaperTrail @Demolishun Agreed a thousand times over.
  • 1
    @PaperTrail @Demolishun @Root I agree, but my personal belief is that the pandemic is real. If this was about controlling through fear, there are just so many better things to pursue, like nuclear holocaust, etc. and those things have been pursued.

    There’s another metric: I am not afraid of the pandemic. For it to be a fear mongering tactic, I have to be afraid. But I am not. I’ve known enough people who were killed by this to know it’s real.

    Whether we can afford the economic damage is another question entirely.

    Now how to get control of the media back is in my mind a separate issue. Having the government get involved is a non-option if you ask me unless you want us to end up like China. But private media clearly can’t be held accountable either. I want to know how people think we can overcome this because it is a very serious problem with no obvious solution.

    The thing is the media downplaying the pandemic is ALSO lying to us in equal proportion to those blowing it out of proportion. The economic and political strings attached are very easy to see in either case.
  • 2
    @FrodoSwaggins Extreme decoupling from China is a good start. Hollywood is basically owned by China and is now a propaganda mill for them. I have lost almost all respect for traditional media channels. This will create new media channels over time.
  • 1
    @Demolishun I’m really annoyed that I can’t even figure out what’s true. I can’t tell if hospitals are overwhelmed or not. I can’t tell if the deaths are probably caused by Covid 19 infection. All the sources that are saying it’s a hoax we’re written in early April. Did everyone change their mind since then? All I want is to be able to hear PRIMARY sources on both sides of the matter and then decide for myself. You can’t find it. Very, very annoying. Everyone saying it was a hoax did so anonymously. To me, that’s a made up story. If you have reason to believe something, say who you are. Otherwise I can be 100 people who have no credentials saying whatever I want. This type of thing is way too hard to pull off on an international scale.
  • 0
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins One thing I do like about all this is that it is exposing all the politicians that are only interested in power. I hope to God this overturns senate and house election choices in the future.
  • 2
    @FrodoSwaggins

    >my personal belief is that the pandemic is real.

    Yea, its real. My wife and son are both nurses, so I get an earful almost every day. They aren't on the front line yet (hospital has specific training and areas for covid patients) The basic, common sense stuff should be good enough. Social distance, wear a mask in *public*, wash your hands, etc. Simple stuff. The way the government picks winners & loosers (closing X business, but allowing Y business to be open) is obscene. If Walmart dictates all customers must wear a mask, WEAR A MASK, or shop somewhere else. None of this "boo hoo..I have a medical condition and cant wear a mask..poor me...boo hoo..you better let me shop or I'll have twitter mob close you down" nonsense. I, if I were a business owner, should dictate how my business responds to this crisis, not the SJW mob.

    Getting way off the devrant topic.

    OK, SharePoint online sucks as much as on-prem SharePoint. Ahh..that's better.
  • 0
    @PaperTrail ahahahahah you think you have rights.

    cute.

    suppose it is a fake pandemic. suppose they went so far as to put ankle monitors on everyone to ensure full complaince or some shit.

    what would YOU do about it?

    probaby fucking nothing.

    If I told you this was coming, two full years ago, would you have believed me?

    If a year ago I told you we were going to be where we are now, would you have believed me?

    If I told you where we'll be one one year from now, would you believe?

    You dont want to know what the next few years will be.

    ignorance is bliss.
  • 2
    @PaperTrail yeah there is definitely some sickening side chain stuff going on that is not cool at all and a lot of it is the way businesses are treated.
  • 3
    @Wisecrack as much as I hate to say it you are kind of right, but it’s not to say that we can’t live a life of freedom. You can prove anyone doesn’t have rights. Japanese American internment of the 1940s. Just when those Americans needed their rights the most, the government took them away. That means you don’t have any.

    That doesn’t mean we have no control over our destiny. For the military and police to do that to their own citizens they have to not think it’s wrong. People have to tolerate and obey those politicians. Possible with a strong fear infrastructure and enough voter fraud, but Americans are unpredictable. Idk. I think I’m more optimistic than this.
  • 2
    @Wisecrack

    >hahahahah you think you have rights. cute.

    I think I do. I exercise my 1st and 2nd Amendment rights a lot and will not vote for anyone who attempts to restrict any of them.

    For example, if 'Jake' campaign ad is "Vote for me and I'll remove all the trolls on devrant who make fun of your rights!", I'm sure there will be a few who will vote for Jake. I won't. We can disagree and that's OK. We should be allowed to disagree, unless it's about accessing SharePoint Online via C#. Everyone should agree Microsoft pooped the shoot on the crapfest that is their SharePoint Client nuget package. Examples don't compile, don't work...I'm going to run out of space if I keep going.

    Good luck brotha', or sista', or whatever gender you identify with. May the code be with you.
  • 1
    @Demolishun be careful what you wish for. One bomb or a few gunshots at one of these idiotic rallies from an unaffiliated party and there won't be an election. The only thing that's preventing it is that those that would see it happen would rather not have trump in office when it did. Let it start looking like he's for sure going to win again and we might not be so lucky.

    As far as the first amendment goes, I think it's safe to say at this point that it was never meant to scale in the way it has. There should be a clause in there somewhere that states you do not have the right to be a snake or an idiot. Unfortunately no one could've predicted the impact the internet would have.

    We used to at least have liable laws to protect us from businesses that would put out misinformation but even those have been cast out at this point in an effort to allow them to compete with the local blogger that's almost guaranteed to beat them to the punch.
  • 1
    @M1sf3t I disagree. Because then someone has to decide what constitutes idiot. Countries like Russia and China have clearly demonstrated that not having basic freedoms of thought and expression are the absolute worst crimes against humanity that you can possibly commit, so let’s at the very least learn from that.

    It certainly feels like we have way more rights and freedoms here than many other places in the world, I don’t take that for granted in any way.
  • 3
    @WildPotato Voluntary communism is completely different from government enforced communism. The point is choice.
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins i was being facetious when i used the word idiot. My point was that with the internet being what it is, it's no longer a good idea to allow those that would speak before they think to go without penalty as long as they were willing to print a retraction. Unless that retraction comes a split second later then the damage has already been done and there is no fixing it.

    Not that I can say what the best way to handle it would be, but the penalties for being wrong, good intentions or not, should at least be severe enough to warrant a pause. Especially for those that have a national platform to speak from
  • 2
    If I paint my garage, on my property, that would be my right. I own the garage, I bought the paint.

    The paint smells, and my neighbor complains about the smell from the painted garage door. Should he be able to stop me from moving on to paint my fence?

    I can hardly stop compounds in the paint from evaporating. My right to protect my property has a higher weight than the temporary nuisance it causes... Also, the paint dried in the air above my property. I own that air. I can't help it if the wind blows it away.

    Still, I feel bad for him, I buy him a pack of beer, and he agrees to stop complaining.

    I paint the fence. In the next 15 years, the rain erodes the paint. The lead-based pigment gets into the groundwater, and my neighbor is poisoned by the water from his well.

    But I didn't poison his well. He lowered the groundwater with by pumping the water up. This caused the aquifer to flow from my house to his house.

    He not only poisoned himself, but also stole my water.
  • 4
    Anyway, my point is, even logically consistent libertarian "property" arguments can get quite difficult, when trying to unravel the ethics of the negative externalities of exercising your personal freedoms.

    I agree that denying someone access to your business property unless they wear a mask is absolutely warranted.

    I'd even argue that certain limitations to freedoms in the public space by governments are warranted -- yes, it does infringe upon your freedoms, but only to protect the freedoms of other individuals.

    But it gets more difficult if a private business operates in an effective monopoly (for example transport, or the only town supermarket), and refuses to service people without masks, even when masks are not available. Or when a home for elderly people decides to not allow family onto the premises anymore, and effectively turns into a prison -- what is more important, physical health or not being lonely?

    There's certainly a bunch of questions without easy answers.
  • 3
    @Demolishun

    >Voluntary communism is completely different from government enforced communism.

    Communism/socialism/dictatorship is practiced pretty heavily in my house. No one gets a vote for supper, no one 'owns' the ice tea in the fridge, if I want to watch 'This Old House' and my wife wants to watch 'Greys Anatomy', we watch Greys.
  • 2
    @bittersweet a very wise man once explained that to me as you have freedom to do as you please as long as it doesn't infringe upon the freedoms of others. Your right though it does get complicated. Not that it matters here anymore, our government has long since abolished that policy in the name consumerism and christianity
  • 0
    @PaperTrail if you would not defend yourself against a false arrest under an illegal law than your rights are delusions.
  • 2
    @M1sf3t the most dangerous thing that exists today is mass media. provable slander should be a felony. think about it: it takes years to build a reputation, and something as serious as someones marriage, business, or lifes work could be wrecked by a single malicous act: spreading a rumor or an accusation.

    hell accusing someone of, racism, or other horrible shit, unless it can be proven, should be considered a threat against someones life. People have been killed, assaulted, lost jobs, destroyed property, over less than that. Is there a good reason slander shouldt be heavily punished?
  • 2
    this was so good i didn't even bring about popcorn.....I just opened a can of beer and I am enjoying arguments. I believe that everyone here brings valid points. Still, it is my firm belief that other than what Americans (and I am speaking specifically about Americans here) just don't like being restricted over whatever sense of freedom they have.

    We see it in the news all the time. Some black kid gets shot by the police and you hear the "well, you should obey the law!" arguments, the moment the minor inconvenience of wearing a fucking cloth to protect OTHER people comes about it is suddenly a violation of frEeDomS.

    This pandemic ain't about to end, people will not respect the authority enforced by business owners and no one gives a fuck about other people. I for one welcome the most fatal form of the pandemic, I am hoping for a cleansing since it is easier to dislodge the negatives than to try and have people change.

    Our country is in a dire situation.
  • 2
    @WildPotato if you ask me though that’s the problem. You don’t have to be a communist country to want to take charge of your situation collectively. This country survived as long as it has because people did that. I think it’s sad that we are not trying as hard any more.
  • 2
    @Demolishun I wouldn’t even call it communism. I’d call it just straight up caring and being considerate. It has nothing to do with policy. It’s upbringing and media consumption.
  • 2
    @bittersweet I do get what you’re saying and I’ll cite my phone anecdote. I’m forcibly barred from most activities that most Americans enjoy. It sucks. But at some point you just shouldn’t have to kiss customers asses if they don’t agree to your terms and conditions of patronage.

    “I want to eat at your Burger King and the customer is always right so we’re going to have people waterboarded in here so I can be entertained while I eat”

    Like come on, there needs to be protection against basic indecency at the least.
  • 2
    @AleCx04 totally agree. Bonus points, people want to force their will and values on others here. Just not cool.
  • 3
    @FrodoSwaggins

    Definitely.

    But it can be a difficult line to draw... Where do your freedoms end and someone else's freedoms begin?

    I stopped smoking 20 years ago, and really dislike being near smokers. I'm very happy smoking is not allowed indoors at the workplace and in restaurants by law here.

    But in a public space like a shopping street... Does my freedom to breathe clean air weigh more heavily than someone else's right to smoke? I would think so, but I have to admit I'd be arguing from my own bias and emotion as someone who hates smoking, not from an ethical/logically consistent set of reasons.

    The parallel to pandemics is easy to make: If someone gets close to you with their germs flying all over the place, do you infringe upon their freedoms by telling them to keep their distance, or do they infringe upon yours by invading your personal space?
  • 2
    @bittersweet it's interesting that you bring up smoking because it's a good example of how our officials make a habit of taking things too far. The city I went to college in instituted a ban on smoking indoors some time ago. Businesses were not given a choice in the matter nor were they allowed the opportunity to build the special smoking sections like you see in other areas that effectively keep the smoke contained to just that section.

    As a result inner city bars lost a tremendous amount of business, especially during the fall and winter when college was in session and spring break/summer vacation was not. It also raised the dui rates coming from the county bars because the police began heavily poaching the limited amount of directions you could leave from them.
  • 0
    Of course you could say that they shouldn't be driving anyway but given the way alcohol metabolizes it can be argued that at least a few of the ppl were below the limit when they left and the added travel time has put not just them but everyone at risk. In fact I watched a friend of mine that I know was sober, leave an inner city bar intending to drive 4 blocks home.

    He got pulled over along the way, passed both the field sobriety test and the breathalyzer but because he was so close they decided to bring him in anyway in order to meet their montly quota. By the time they got him to the station nearly an hour later he finally blew a few points over and they booked him.
  • 1
    Now years later (back to the smoking ban) the after affects of the ban are that nearly every bar that had the ability to do so has built really nice deck and patio areas and lined them with gas heaters. The irony, the patios stay overcrowded with both smokers and non-smokers alike, meanwhile the indoor part of the bar remains a ghost town. And personally I feel it's only a matter of time before this will lead to us getting banned from the patios as well
  • 1
    Things only americans find debatable 🤷‍♂️
  • 0
  • 0
    @bittersweet I don’t know. If you’re on the street that’s government property and I would assume it’s ok for them to set rules. What you can do in your house is really different than what you can do in the street, so I would say if the Feds or the state want to pass an ordinance then that’s just it. If you’re on a businesses property then they get to set the rules and that’s it.
  • 1
    @bittersweet if I may chip in, those freedoms end when they become a punishable nuisance over others.
    For example, had a neighbor that would not stop blasting his music like if he had a concert inside of his house, on a Sunday night. I *hate* loud bass music, I really do, I will be the first to go ahead and say that I am 100% biased about it because of how much I hate listening to the bass make my house tremble inside, it irritates the fuck out of me.

    BUT, this moron is within his right to play it UNTIL a particular time. In his case, for a Sunday night that was 08:00PM according to our city ordinance.....it was 11:00. I politely asked him to either turn the bass off, lower it down, or just turn the music off altogether, his words? "I am within my rights to play my music in my own house" and closed the door. He wasn't obnoxiously rude, but rude, and wrong. So I called the cops and they made him take the music down.
  • 1
    @AleCx04 that one is a tough one for me too. I play drums and most of my neighbors are cool but I have one that complains endlessly.

    I’m above the daytime noise ordinance level but that’s not to say it’s loud. I live in a rural area, houses are far apart, and it’s not too unreasonably loud. The ordinance is very quiet in my neighborhood. I’ve agreed to play during lunch time for the time being but it’s still annoying him. He’s been very clear that he’s completely unwilling to compromise.

    It’s very unreasonable.
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins The rest of the world is wearing a mask out of care of others. Where as American teachers as young as 19 years old have to confront the chance of dying a horrible covid suffocation death. Because politicians make reopening schools and mandating mask wearing a debatable political issue. Instead of a humanitarian crisis.

    If you ask me the pandemic is that bad in the usa because this human suffering is profitable for hospitals and insurance and shareholding politicians. And thus there is an incentive to reopen shools and governers banning mask wearing mandates from mayors.
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins @AleCx04

    I wasn't necessarily talking about rules or legality, more about the philosophy of ethics.

    Disregarding pandemics, I dislike it if someone stands too close to me.

    We find it obvious that you can't put your finger in a random person's nose, or climb on their shoulders. They own their body.

    But do people own their personal space? How much of the space around you are you leasing from the public?

    That question has parallels all over the place (loud music, viruses, air pollution, trees throwing shade, cats pooping in gardens, bikes parked against buildings, etc), and laws rarely give completely reasonable answers.
  • 0
    @bittersweet This is sorta related to this thread, but it defines the restrictions on free speech (in US at least):

    https://mtsu.edu/first-amendment/...
  • 1
    rough calculation
    There are 4.1 million recorded covid cases in the usa. 146'596 Dead.
    Let's say 400'000 people got ventilated. Which each results in a ridiculous Hospital Bill of 1.5 Million USD. = $600’000’000’000

    that number is the same as the GDP of Croatia 😆😢
  • 0
    @heyheni Hospitals have been losing money this entire crisis. They get about 30K per covid patient from the government.
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins that person is definitely in the wrong. In my case I normally noise canceling plugs or headphones to mitigate such things, and while I understand this might not be practical for everyone I still do it because during the day it is within their own right to play music just like it is your right to enjoy a good drumming session. That guy needs to learn to compromise, at least for the sake of being a good neighbor which he obviously is not.

    I play the electric guitar and normally connect headphones to my amplifier because my downstairs neighboor takes care of his elderly mom and asked me if there was anything I could do to help out while she sleeps. Broke my heart really, dude had been putting up with my shredtastic sessions for months before saying something, and he was so polite it just made me feel absolutely horrible. Sadly one can only do that with drums if they are of the digital type and not everyone likes those
  • 1
    @bittersweet Got you, it really is a gray area. I remember that someone told my previous manager that she should not sit on my desk when reviewing items with me since it might be seen as harassment. We went into a whole debate as to why it could not being that she was allowed to do so by me, but in turn someone mentioned themselves feeling uncomfortable by the action, even if the action was not done on them. As in, someone walks in, sees her sitting on my desk while talking to me, and someone fills out a complaint. To me it sounded weird but it is yet another example about what you mean.
    I can definitely see it.
  • 1
    @AleCx04 Was she sitting on the desk, facing you, legs wrapped around your torso? Was your head buried in her ample bosom? Were you exploring her cleavage with your lips? Did she approve your pull request? C'mon, I need some material for my erotic novel.
  • 0
    @heyheni its a debate because idiots will be idiots and you see half the population wearing the masks around their neck and forehead like a fashion statement up until the point they walk into the store.
  • 0
    As far as noise ordinances (compromise) go this is supposed to be why we have lawmakers and judges, because two individuals that are taking issue with each others habits can rarely see past their own view in order to make the compromise themselves.

    For example, @FrodoSwaggins if you were to play your drums next door everyday at lunch you would be serving as my alarm clock and be limiting me to about 3 hrs of sleep. It would suit me better for you to play them late in the evening/night. However I'm in the extreme minority, for most ppl lunch is a common time to be awake and chances are to appease me the neighbor on the other side of you will be bothered. So the decision is left up to someone with a full view of the city and can decide what serves best for the most ppl.

    Unfortunately here in the US when it comes to "most ppl", money and political connections weigh in and "most ppl" soon becomes "most pull" and has very little to do with the actual number of physical bodies.
  • 1
    Tl:dr It's a compromised system rather than a system of compromise and everyone knows it. That's how these debates over what you think would be common sense always arise and why many of us still continue to keep the government and liberal policies at arm's length. It's not that we don't see the need, we just trust our own ability to work out these things amongst ourselves more than we trust the government to do it for us.
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins

    I literally searched: "drum shield" and found this:

    https://sweetwater.com/store/...

    Kinda spendy though.
  • 1
    @bittersweet had I been single then yes. But no man, twas not the case. I am but a pure angel.
  • 1
    @M1sf3t the thing is, I play drums so we all know what’s going to be decided as best for most people. It’s a really tough hobby
  • 1
    @Demolishun added to shopping list, but won’t do as much as one might think. It’s like shooting off a gun in the house, it goes through everything. I have a bunch of plywood and I’m currently in the process of boarding up my windows and creating an isolation table on the floor.

    I wouldn’t say that’s too spendy. You wouldn’t believe what I spent on my home studio if I told you :D
  • 1
    @Demolishun also not clear my kit will fit. It’s huge. Like 10 pieces two bass drums huge.
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins You can show the lengths you went to for accommodating the fuckwad to a judge if you have to. The real money you spent. Also, what is the db value you have to be below. Him hearing you is not a valid metric. If you can show that the db level is below some value then you may be able to legally tell him to fuck off.

    If he is old maybe corona will eventually solve this issue...
  • 0
    @Demolishun Get a db meter is what i am saying.
  • 2
    @Demolishun I bought a meter. I’m 80 peak at the street roughly 60 rms. I think 55 is what I need to be below. I assume that’s peak but that’s really unreasonable, crickets are louder than that. So it’s tough. I live in a trashy neighborhood with these rich jackoffs that like making laws to bully other people into living on their terms. Sucks ass.
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins Call the cops on him when he is having sex.
  • 0
    @Demolishun two words: hollywood accounting.
  • 0
    @Wisecrack ?

    All I can find is this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

    Doesn't seem to match.
  • 0
    @Demolishun it means accointing in such a way as to disguise profits as losses.
  • 2
    @FrodoSwaggins yea thats one reason I switched to the guitar. Still make friends with your mayor and get one of the offspring interested in them and you never know 🤷🏻‍♂️

    (again that was sarcasm)
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