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I've been working as a developer for 10+ years now. I have never seen a real life project with good code, unit testing, planned architecture, and stuff, and I have worked on countless projects. I didn't had the luck to ever work in a greenfield project. All I ever did was grind over someone else's old, badly written, unintelligible legacy code. I am frustrated. I'm thinking about just giving up, because, to me, it seems like no one gives a shit about software quality. No one cares that someone will need to maintain your crappy code. There is no such thing as good code out there. It's simply an utopia to imagine that any project will not rot over time and make some developer's life miserable. This life is a hell... I can't stand it anymore...
...
just needed to get this out of my system :(

Comments
  • 4
    On just few projects we had proper timeframe and proper budget to get all things done properly. Let's be honest. Most of the projects are just about making money.
  • 2
    @Lexter This is true. Everything that matters is just fucking money... I hate this.
  • 2
    @andremteixeira Sadly, we need some food and have limited time. So we do fun stuff on our projects. But clients projects? They are working, goodly crafted websites or apps. But not our toys.
  • 0
    @Lexter I'm not talking about doing fun stuff. I think you missed the point. I'm talking about quality. It's far more costly to maintain a poorly written code base than a good one (at least this is what Robert C. Martin says)
  • 1
    @andremteixeira There are bad code and bad code. Bad code as realy bad code objectively or bad code like everybody writing bad code except me. But you know, most of the time there is just no time or money for do all that fancy stuff to produce extremely high quality product. Yep, it is anoying.
  • 1
    @Lexter As I said in the post: Code without tests, no architecture, no good practices, no separation of concerns. This is the norm of the industry. I'm not talking about the looks of the code, or about style, I'm talking about *quality*
  • 1
    @andremteixeira Ach i see now. Yep, it should be norm. Otherwise, we just gluing some shit together to make it work. You are right.
  • 1
    @Lexter Our industry is the ONLY one that calls good practices "fancy stuff". (most) Engineers will not just skip testing because of deadlines. Doctors will not just not plan a surgery in order to be fast.
  • 1
    @andremteixeira Utopia, nicely sounding. In real word we must choose what we can do in current conditions and make a deal with client. Hey i agree with you. Sounds nice, should be the norm. Just month before i finished one project with decent budget and calm client. It was great pice of code with all that needed parts. Week ago i finished some shit for some ass to make some money.
  • 3
    I have 4 years in industry. 2 of them I understand at least to some level what is quality and why it matters. I then reached the same conclusion as you.. and then I said fuck it. I only take a job now that promises me control, and I don't ask permissions n to do things properly.

    One other thing an Engineer or doctor do, is just do it like it's a given. They don't ask to practice their profession...

    If I get blocked I will be honest that I will resign, and do it if I must.

    I refuse to commit to constant studying, being expected to produce excellent experience, and yet produce it super quick, and yet be dictated as to how I will achieve that such that I am fucked whatever I do.

    We have the privilege that we can just go get another job.. if we want to practice our craft we should leverage that. However we should also be aware that ours is just one viewpoint about how to make a business succeed. We need to be willing to compromise, and be aggressive about making others compromise.
  • 3
    You remind me of this poor guy:

    https://stilldrinking.org/programmi...
  • 6
    >"I'm thinking about just giving up"

    Here is a thing to help you relax: there is no way out. So you can stop thinking about giving up
  • 1
  • 1
    Yeah, the only good codebase I ever seen was on my solo projects or projects with a friend...
    Professionaly all the standards and "best practices" do sometimes cause huge blocks of spaghetti. Don't get me wrong, standards are great and they work, but often theres a *thing* you need to do, and the standard dictates you go the longway around and you end up creating a soup of weirdly placed code because a rule or two will forbid you from doing it cleanly... And it wont pass code review and even if it does sonarQube or similar will blame you!

    So It's not always just about being lazy and not caring, sometimes you get bad quality code because of industry standards
  • 2
    Spooky. In the past two semesters, I've had close to 6 subjects on system development methodology, requirements engineering, enterprise systems, etc. Is it all for nothing?
  • 1
    Sorry it’s been so tough. Have you considered working for a startup, so there isn’t legacy code you need to refactor? Instead, you can start fresh, and write good code from scratch.
  • 1
    I’ve been working on a really poorly written app for the last two years and I’m ashamed to say it, it was one I wrote. But in my defence it was the result of a customer moving the goalposts daily and keeping the same deadline. But the new app I’ve told them under no circumstances am I going to be rushed and that I’m going to be taking my time to do it right. I’m enjoying coding again and it’s clean :)
  • 2
    @skoobi Way to stand your ground. Great that you are able to admit your faults on your code base, identify the issue with everchanging client demands, and approach it again with the right approach! Let’s go!!
  • 1
    It's frustrating, but I would say the best way to do it is plan how to make it clean and try your best to make it better then when you first saw it. Then it feels good if you attain part of your goals.

    So many "engineers" always do quick and dirty hacks, justifying it with the "I dOn'T hAvE tImE tO dO iT pRoPeRlY" bullshit excuse. They just have poor work ethic.

    In the end, you waste more time, because build machines are dying, prod is broken or worse, customer product is not up to par.
  • 1
    @wakenightRyu Oh, I did work for startups. Startups are even worse, because they always want to "go fast and break things". Startups always want you to be "passionate" and think like you were the "owner" of the business, because this means you will work countless hours without complaining and make your boss richer.
  • 1
    @Communist I advise you to not hold any hopes about professionalism if you start working with it.
  • 1
    @andremteixeira are you good with people? You could change career to become a manager?
  • 1
    @heyheni Unfortunately not. Dealing with people is not a natural thing to me.
  • 1
    @Lexter of course it’s about making money, why would a company waste their money and talent on something they’re not going to profit from (money and/or public image)...
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