74
linuxxx
125d

I remember that time my class (first year of software development) wrote a huge project for a real company as practice for irl stuff.

I was the only Linux user and it would be deployed on a Linux server.

Spent 10 weeks of development and then the moment of deployment on a Linux server began!

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Nothing was case sensitive, everything was programmed for a windows architecture (backward slashes etc) and mssql was used while we would host it on a MySQL server.

The tree core guys spent three days or so to make the entire fucker compatible 😂

It was enjoyable to see them (literally) sweat 😊 (it had been known from the very beginning)

Comments
  • 9
    I just want to mention ORMs with exchangable database backend. They might not be everybodys favorite, but for me they always worked.
  • 7
    @gitreflog first class, never programmed before (the most guys) and this was about 6 years ago :)
  • 4
    To be fair, case sensitivity sucks...

    Did any of the team members switch from Windows after they got it working?
  • 5
    @RiderExMachina case sensitivity just makes sense.
  • 1
    @Torbuntu
    Please explain? I've ran into more issues with case sensitivity than I have with case insensitivity
  • 6
    @RiderExMachina It is much more concise. More reliable, in that there is no confusion between DirectoryName and Directoryname. One is clearly different than the other. I would never expect Danish (language) and danish (pastry) to be the same capitalization when used in the middle of a sentence. Plus even in computer terms A and a are different things by memory. So saying they are the same (case insensitivity) is illogical
  • 1
    @Torbuntu
    I'm mostly folder structure but that can still be easily fixed, a la "Danish (country), danish (pastery)". That may not be the most precise way, but it's more informative, especially if someone were to not know what one of the two things were.
  • 3
    @RiderExMachina Probably was a crappy example on my part. But I literally fail to understand how a system Should be insensitive to case that makes to logical sense to me
  • 3
    @Torbuntu I agree.
    A != a
    65 != 97

    Fuzzy comparisons only ever lead to confusion, and confusion is bad.
  • 1
    Actually at my job, on our dev laptops, we have a case sensitive partition where we code in, because in the past there's been to many small screw-ups due to wrong cased files ending up on our case sensitive production systems... And those can be soo annoyingly hard to spot if you don't immediately realise what's happening...
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