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  • 4
    I find that trend really hilarious, because before I started my CS degree I did a few web dev internships (6 years ago) and that was the kind of shit I would do and everyone hated it. edit: of course not exactly but close

    I'm a really bad designer btw. Show me a pile of shit and a pile of gold and I'm unable to distinguish between the two. So seeing that the shit I tried to design 6 years ago is supposed to be trendy now is just seriously fucked up.
  • 3
    aww I like this trend 😞
  • 1
    @M1sf3t It only really looks good if the entire UI is like that, and neumorphism buttons are a terrible terrible idea.
  • 6
    I had to look up the word and read about the trend. Then I laughed. It's just old Apple stuff. Any differences are there to make UI/ux designers feel like they've done something new and asked them to market it as " modern" while the thing being done today is now " legacy". It's how they rationalize the need for their jobs. IMO, the designers in our industry are close to useless and initiate more needless rewrites of software than anything else. Just think for a moment of why you would pay again for a piece of software that is functionally identical but looks "dated".
  • 4
    "Designers" found another way to make user interfaces unusable because "designers" have no clue about UI design. Affordability? Accessibility? Fuck even just readability? Noooooo.
  • 3
    @Fast-Nop I'm very design oriented and this is the reason my design work has been reigned in quite a bit. "Looking good" subjectively is not enough for a design to work.
  • 1
    @monkeyboy I had to look it up too and wow, I hate it. I hated it when Apple did it a few years ago and I'll continue hating it if it makes a resurgence.
  • 1
    Never seen it until I looked it up. Looks pretty stupid if you ask me; it's like hi res windows 3.2. I'd never want it in my UI.
  • 2
    Looks like designs I used to make.
    I kind of like it.
    I also kind of hate some of the examples I've seen.
  • 2
    I fell in love wuth it at first sigh. Of course it fas from the original skeuomorphisme but looks sexy and minimalist, very easy to apply.
    Lo ve it
  • 1
    @DeathAtDawn no I don't guess it would lend itself to other styles very well.

    @Fast-Nop a designer can fuck up the ui no matter what style they choose to go with, it's all in how it's applied.

    At least with neumorphism you can stage your images and shading to load separately and the design still look ok before it finishes. At least it seems like that would work, I'll have to get back to you when I finishing figuring out how to preload part of my page properly 🙄
  • 1
    @M1sf3t Image based design? Did the 90s call and want their websites back or what?
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop i was thinking more about icons and basic vectors but if you can get them not to take five hours to load then I don't see why not, hasn't been done in a while.

    Really all I was getting at is that most of these designs look like their flat counterparts would only with a few gradients and shading mixed in. If you were concerned about speed you could preload the flat part of the design then lazy load the extra detail after everything required for the site to work has loaded.
  • 2
    @M1sf3t There's nothing to load extra. The shadows are of course done with CSS and not as images in Photoshop like in the 90s.
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop right, i guess that would be the normal way of doing it. I've got overlays on the brain right now, sorry.

    Still, does that extra little bit of styling cost extra time or what you mean by unusable?
  • 2
    @M1sf3t Especially neumorphic buttons totally suck because you can't really tell pressed from not pressed. The cards aren't that visible either because the contrast to the background is too low. It's the usual list where designers who have no clue about web and think just because they can suck dick in Photoshop, they know shit about UI.
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop ok I see what you mean. Some aren't as bad as others, at least not in terms of showing whats active.

    Performance was said to be one of the big advantages of flat so I thought that might've been what you meant by expensive.
  • 1
    @M1sf3t I'm not 100% sure about the timeline, but I think flat design came along before CSS was that good. 20 years ago, e.g. glossy buttons as image links were totally common.

    Ironically, flat came along right when devices became capable of shiny UIs. The only major OS that was in the short time window in between was Win 7 with Aero.
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