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After interviewing 3 candidates for software today, I have officially decided its time to seriously pursue creating a YouTube channel with a complete set of series to learn programming MY WAY... not the short cut way... this will go all the way to beginning and start the person up with a solid foundation to build on... I’m going to pour my knowledge into these series.
The education system has failed too many in the real world... to many people I have interviewed they think they know have a degree but are clueless.. this is unacceptable and a waste... AND way too often I see online “learn programming in 30 days or learn programming in a day”... fuck off it’s all lies .. all wrong.. wrong methods wrong philosophy and I’m done with it...
I’m set on doing it this time, I’ve put it off too long, and longer I put it off the more I see shitty interviews! Time to fix it

Comments
  • 10
    The problem you seem to have is that people are learning "coding" and not "programming".
  • 4
    @jespersh I couldn’t agree more... and then there’s another step... beyond “programming” ... software engineering... many syntactically accurate “programmers” lack the ability to engineer software from an architectural standpoint, paradigms and philosophy. They just hard code the shit out of everything and do everything the long way, because they jumped right in to quickly solve the problem rather than think about the problem at hand and how to solve it effectively and efficiently with minimum effort... (typing)
  • 8
    @jespersh interviewed a guy today... for embedded software engineer... had C, C++, Java and python on his resume as skills and 7 years of experience. Come to find out the 7 years of experience is only in python... the only time he used the other languages was in class in college, hasn’t touched it since.. biggest pet peeve people listing inaccurate skills, rather them be honest rather than put everything down and hope for the best...
    The other kicker was he had no idea what a compiler and linker and assembler was... I’m like dude.. if you wanna be embedded stop the whole python gig and learn C.. and learn theory.. and understand how it all works together.. stop hacking shit together in python... because he didn’t even understand any OOP concepts 7 years in python ... not understanding any OOP concepts.. purely just a hacker get stuff working...
  • 1
    I'm a noob at all this, at least professionally, given I don't work in software development… perhaps you can share some questions/aspects of job interviews that candidates routinely fuck up?
  • 4
    @QuanticoCEO Some random comments on what you said:

    > C, C++, Java and python on his resume as skills and 7 years of experience. Come to find out the 7 years of experience is only in python

    Unfortunately modern recruitment basically demands this practice. If you don't embellish your CV, and list every technology you might have heard of in passing, your CV is not likely to be found appealing.

    > he had no idea what a compiler and linker and assembler was

    Really? I would have thought that learning C and Assembly requires that kind of knowledge… but maybe that's just me who learned that stuff in my teens, back in the late 80s/early 90s on a Commodore Amiga…

    > if you wanna be embedded

    Most embedded controllers today probably have more RAM and CPU power than the Amiga I owned back in the day, so I wouldn't be afraid to try.
  • 6
    @SomeNone so I mainly hire for Embedded Software Engineers so the questions may not directly apply to you but should apply to anyone who’s applying for the job..
    1. Tell me when you would use a Interrupt
    2. Tell me about the different perf hardware you have used.
    3. Tell me about the different serial protocols you have used.
    4. Tell me the smallest microcontroller architecture you have written software for.
    5. What software standards do you write to
    6. How do you debug your software on a micro without a incurcuit debugger.
    7. What is your software validation/testing process.
    8. If the person lists java, I alway ask soo how do you do multiple inheritance in java.. typically the don’t know what inheritance is which tells me they don’t understand OOP.. thus don’t actually know java... and the other way they answer is some random bullshit winging it... then I tell them well you can’t do multiple inheritance in java
    9. Then I ask them to tell me what polymorphism is and how you would use it then abstraction then encapsulation. Regardless if you are using OOP or not you should understand the principles of OOP, all OOP does is make a language developed around the principles and ideas.. but even languages like C Can do OOP concepts it’s just not built into the keywords of the language but it’s entirely possible.
  • 1
    In this, I want to give you my opinion on the same, This is not the right way, Because already there are thousands of resources available from where you can learn programming like Standford and udemy. My opinion if someone is interested in something then he can achieve or can learn programming with any way.

    There are three types of students or applicants:

    1. Who are experts and well know that what they need to do? Then these type of applicants are reading/ reviewing video courses till the end of the courses.

    2. Who are average applicants and know only basics about the technology not more than that, they are keen to learn but not to focused.

    3. Who have not clear basics and don't have goal.

    So You can create but the possibility is still zero that they will learn and can create any app or web application after watching your courses on programming.
  • 4
    @SomeNone do not embellish your resume... if you put it on your resume you damn well bet I will ask you about it.. if you falsely claim something to get a job it’s lying... period I don’t care what recruiters say they are WRONG!
    Just listing everything you learned in college and claiming it as a skill makes you no difference than every other kid that went thru the same class.. I see that all too often as there are many colleges in the area, and these kids all put the same thing... sure they don’t have experience and want it... that’s fine tell me that, and i will build you up don’t overbloat your capabilities.
    At the end of the day I end up hireing more people who have gone thru our intern/coop program than people who come off the street for lack of better word. Because the interns are moldable the interns are more willing to absorb info.
  • 0
    @QuanticoCEO Some answers off the top of my head to your interview questions:

    1. Interrupts, as the name implies, interrupt the normal program execution in order to do important work, typically on a precise schedule, for example refresh the video or move data from/to an I/O port. Interrupts usually come along with an elevation of privileges at the CPU level in order to facilitate 'special' operations a 'normal' user-level program is not supposed to perform.

    2. You mean performance level? RAM or clock speed constraints? I guess most important there will be the lowest performing ones, as that is where coding efficiency (i.e. using less RAM and CPU cycles) really makes a difference. When it comes to C, that would be the old Amiga with MC68000 CPU at 7.09Mhz and 1MB of RAM. Load everything into RAM, and transform it, like modern functional programming likes to do? Sorry, no can do, need efficient buffering techniques using small buffers.
  • 0
    3. Sorry, haven't used any but I remember reading about several, and I'm happy enough to learn about using and implementing them if it's important for the job.

    4. That would be a Commodore 64, 6510 CPU at 1Mhz, 64K of RAM, and in Assembly. Doing anything worthwhile on these 8-bit machines is a bit of a contortion, to be honest.

    5. Sorry but I don't understand the question, care to elaborate?

    6. If it has a serial connection, we use that for debug output which is caught on a connected PC or similar.

    7. Since I don't work in software development at this time, I don't have one. Best practice yould have you separate your software into small enough logical units (functions or classes), and write tests to verify the functionality of these building blocks. Unfortunately, when time comes to a squeeze, these best practices are usually the first thing to fly out the window.
  • 1
    8. To the best of my recollection, Java does not do multiple inheritance in order to avoid the so-called diamond problem (inheriting from two different classes that have the same base class) that can occur in C++. You can inherit from (i.e. implement) multiple interfaces.

    9. Polymorphism is the expression of different code paths by calling methods of the same name. Say a class B inherits from class A, and overrides its method foo(). Now you have a method bar(A a) which is called with an instance of B (which is also an A because it inherited from it), and inside bar() we have a call to a.foo(). If a is a 'true' A, i.e. not some type which inherited from A, then A's foo() gets called, but if it is a B, then B's foo() gets called, probably doing something different than A's foo(). — Then there is parametric polymorphism, as found in e.g. Java and C#, where a class or method can have one or more type parameters, and make use of instances of the given type in some way or other.
  • 2
    @SomeNone lol thanks for answering the interview questions I ask candidates you did okay.

    Here are my responses.

    1. That is more of textbook what an interrupt is, doesn’t really answer when YOU would use one. Or how... essentially looking most importantly usage in asynchronous communication situations, AND them being set to the highest priority interrupt. Anything a user could interact with. As their interaction tends to be Asynchronous
  • 0
    @SomeNone

    2. When I say hardware perfs... looking for knowing which hardware peripherals you have used... UART, Timers, WDOG, PWM, ADC, GPIO, etc
  • 0
    @SomeNone

    3. Serial communication plays a big part in embedded systems everything from i2c, spi, USB, LIN, UART, CAN... it’s all essentially serial, just different protocols and hardware. But vastly different use cases. High speed, low speed, short distance long distance... emc resistance etc
  • 1
    @SomeNone

    4. “Doing anything worthwhile on 8bits is contortion” absolutely disagree... it’s still widely used in industry.. it’s still a 8 billion dollar industry on its own. As in just the micros alone... not including the products made from the 8bits... like majority of vehicle sensors and system.. electronics in majority of household items. 16 and 32 bit micros are just really entering the consumer world and larger electronic industry beyond computers and phones because relativity speaking the 32bits are still expensive... soo much can be done with a 8bit 4k ram, 14k flash ... 68k assembler for like the Motorola HC11 (now nxp) is just now being phased out. We have some products using a 16k of ram and 128k of flash but those products are high end.
  • 1
    @SomeNone

    5. The standards question regards knowledge of MISRA compliance, AutoSAR compliance... any of the ARNIC compliance’s for aerospace.. even software ISO standards like ANSI and C99, C11 whatever the question was majority to get a feel for the knowledge of industry standards regarding software, how do you comply with it, probably would have elaborated with have you been audited, what tools do you use to ensure compliance. Etc
  • 1
    @SomeNone

    6. This question about debugging was answered acceptable, essentially wanted the candidates to think outside the box, what will they do when pins used to flags the device cannot be used during runtime as those pins are reallocated and can’t dual as debug pins.

    The following answers are correct
    use serial printF .. or some sort of serial com...
    use Oscope to check the levels of a line
    Program a wiggle line and monitor on a oscope..
    Use a logic analyzer to debug .. etc

    Not acceptable would be continue to reprogram until desired result occurs
    Step thru the the code in your head
  • 1
    @SomeNone

    7. You are absolutely correct on this one. Including the thrown out the window portion. Except when we must meet compliance and thus need to still provide proof we did do the testing required for the compliance.
  • 1
    @SomeNone

    8. Absolutely correct, exact answer I was looking for... typically stump many college students and fresh grads with that question especially the ones whom claim to be “java experts” on their resume ... love giving that question first when they state expert.. so fun to watch them fail the first question then look utterly confused and begin to question what they’ve learned. Hahah
  • 2
    @SomeNone

    9. You are correct, bonus points for candidates who describe the concepts in C... polymorphism in C would be the use of function pointers with a lookup table, as this proves polymorphism was possible prior to OOP and reiterates you don’t need a OOP language todo OOP concepts
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO Glad to know I'm not entirely chanceless in trying to pivot my career towards software development. :)
  • 1
    @SomeNone not only that but embedded software engineering 😃
  • 2
    @QuanticoCEO As someone with tree years of experience of which all three were spent on my CS degree I can say I've barely heard of the concepts in your first 6 questions and the one's I've heard of I barely know anything about, however the rest of the questions are second nature.

    I think that might be my problem with my degree. I feel like I've learned so much, but lack a lot of real world-skills.
  • 2
    @gomsim what is a CD degree?? Do you mean CS? And if so then I wouldn’t expect you to know the lower level stuff, as it’s more embedded and for some reason the college curriculum has directed CS to be high level shit, and the students get high level concepts but lack low level fundamentals so they are forever stricken to written application layer stuff on platforms controlled by other people/companies... instead of being truly free at the low level.
  • 2
    @QuanticoCEO Heavy stuff! :D And yes, I meant CS. They teach some low level stuff, like harware architecture, assembly language, and all that stuff, but that's never used during the other parts of the education. It's one-time stuff. They are the type of courses that makes it easier for you to understand the stuff should you ever read up on it in the future.
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO Out of interest, what sort of salaries are you offering? I've found in the past you attract a *very* different quality of candidate if the salaries go from being "mediocre / normal" to "around 10-20% more than mediocre / normal".

    FWIW, I'm no embedded dev outside of the hobby space, but I do consider myself (somewhat) a Java expert - I'd be careful with question 8 there these days.

    The correct answer is still "no", to a point, but with the advent of default methods in interfaces, you can use (or mis-use) that functionality to extend from multiple interfaces that actually contain code (as oppose to just method definitions.) It's still not *true* multiple inheritance as there's limitations on those interfaces (they can't store state, they can't have a constructor, etc.) but the answer these days is less "no", and more "not really / sort of."
  • 0
    @AlmondSauce depends on what region you live in... normal and mediocre are subjective adjectives and mean different things to many different people ... personally java devs are a dime a dozen in the larger industry and what’s great is the low level guys are fully capable of writing higher level stuff if need be, with very little holding them back... where vise versa would be major issue.

    As for to number 8.. correct multiple inheritance is not capable in java naturally unless it’s thru an abstract interface.
  • 0
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO Location dependence was exactly why I used the phrases "normal" and "mediocre" ;-) A "normal" salary can vary wildly within as much as a 30 mile radius here. But there *is* generally a normal range for any given location and skillset, and offering more than that seems to give good results in my experience.

    Regarding lower level devs having no problem doing higher level code however - that really doesn't hold up in my experience. I once inherited a C# codebase that was in the hands of some stellar low-level devs I know. It was... functional as it stood, sure, but ugly as anything, hard to follow, no unit tests, and generally really badly / weirdly organised. Unnecessary micro-optimisations all over the place too. A friend of mine once joined a project written in Java by guys with a similar background, and left pretty soon afterwards for similar reasons.

    In both cases the devs saw no problem with it, but no-one else wanted to touch it.
  • 0
    @AlmondSauce hahah well, my argument to that is “does it function” because that’s how most high levels write the stuff to begin with, most are not disciplined into heavily architected software system..
    I would like to view the other folks low level code before making the assumption that they even did that stuff correct...
    there’s a lot of people out there that get by just fine by know enough to get by, and it shows in their style of software. It shows like a sour thumb.. but I know for sure high levels can’t do low level, without a lot of training... but as for any embedded guy that actually knows what he’s doing, higher level should work just fine.
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO Completely agree high levels can't do low level without lots of training. I do it as a hobby, and I'd probably be able to answer a lot of your proposed interview questions on that basis - but I wouldn't dream of jumping into it as a career. My knowledge and confidence level simply isn't there. If I'm getting paid to do a job, I want to be doing a *decent* job, not just getting by.

    That said, perhaps I'm the odd one out, but if anyone in my team simply used "does it function" as the way of getting by they wouldn't get past code review, and if it kept happening they wouldn't be sticking around. That's not even a question that's asked - that should be "do your tests cover every conceivable success, failure and corner case laid out in the spec". But well before that, there's a whole bunch that need to be considered - what it essentially boils down to is "is this the *best* way of solving this particular issue, and if not, why not."
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO I enjoy iot development. My limited experience with the C family of languages comes from tinkering on arduinos. I even breadboarded my own arduino with the mcu and a crystal. Tons of fun.

    Offer me a job, I'll learn anything you need me too. As for instant knowledge recall forget it. Im to old for that and resources for research are far to easy to find.
  • 1
    Hahaha when I took interviews of people from having 3 years experience to 12 years experience, they all are like they know everything.
    But the truth is they only know few things.
    We always expect how we are and how we do work on multiple languages , devops or designing. But the people are just limited to one thing only , like either they can work on java or they can design a page with html /css but not both
    It is very shocking to see such people, all having degrees with big achievement in resume.
    On the other hand I don't have a degree yet (just one paper my university is not clearing up).
    But I am good in coding. Even my friends working in a team together knows less than me working as a two people only team.

    And that thought of yours is good of starting youtube, I too thought and started blog.
    But the actual thing is they do not want to learn and they simply learn the courses with a limited flow.
    They never work on logics and learning
  • 1
    @balvinder294 I couldn’t agree more
  • 1
    Hahaha you are free to do
  • 4
    @balvinder294 If I do a YouTube series it would be extremely in-depth... not just a oh this is helloworld and jump right in... I think that may the one of issues is people jump right into the code and trying build things without understand things. There’s soo much I think they should understand before they even write a single line of code... AND I wouldn’t even start them with C ... I want them to have a SOLID foundation and a solid understanding of high level concepts and where their roots began... I want them to understand its is all layers of abstraction.. but to really see that, they need to understand Boolean logic... then assembly... both learning the assembler and linker concepts... write some programs in assembly then introduce C as a layer of abstraction for portability... teach them C ... then compile and show them the assembly code that is generated from the C code is very similar to the assembly code they were previously writing.. this will solidify the connection there... they will begin to see the assembly instructions in their mind as they write C they will know what it will compile down to... then I will teach them OOP in C... all the OOP concepts and principles of it in C.. teach them good architecture for large projects and portability and refactoring ... THEN I will introduce the next abstraction layer... C++ showing how the OPP stuff that they wrote in C by hand, are now part of the syntax of the language.. this will not solidify their understand of what a class is what inheritance really is.. what polymorphism is at its core.. what all that looks like when the C++ is translated to assembly... and the I keep building and building.. then I introduce the next layer of abstraction and portability... either C# or Java.. or even both at the same time idk... but at this point they will have a solid foundation of principles and coding practices that will set them on a path of success
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO you are very right on how you want to do it.
    But I also started blogging, keeping everything with basic . From like almost start , I myself being a full stack keeps on learning and I know what it is to learn.
    But not everyone thinks like so.
    I have viewed like that 1 month and even 5 minutes video and even many other tutorial . There are like a large number of series already, who are not explaining to code in c or java, but explaining like what and whys of code and how should one do code.
    But people just wanna go with shortcuts , mostly I met they would rather love to copy paste and make it work. They never go on touching that piece of code until it is broken. And when asked what it do, they just say it do what it is do. We all can just try to improve this situation, but ultimately it is them . If they want to learn or not , if they want to go on to basics of how computer circuits work or how a package will work. It is them who should.
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO That's a fairly spot on approach to how the college I went to taught CE. Except it was over a few years so it was really hard to see the connection between the assembler, linker, compiler, vm, what have you. If you could bridge the connection between all of those with a good explanation that would help a lot of new people in the field.
  • 2
    I dig it and think that someone really out to do a series on embedded development :D I work mostly with web and analytics and would definitely be up for learning more about embedded engineering since I know y'all need to really know what you are doing in order to be successful in the field.

    It always amazes me the thing you guys pulled out, using function pointers in a lookup table to do polymorphism sounds fucking brilliant! I remember doing branch tables for a CS class I took while my professor was observing my code, I started to write the array of function pointers outside of the function scope and he just looked at me as o.o and then explained the concept of making it a static variable inside of the same function to limit what can grab the list of functions, I thought it was brilliant.

    10/10 don't know how you crazy tuckers do it but I want to be a part of it, my C-fu is rusty but salvageable
  • 2
    @QuanticoCEO
    🙏🏻 please do make that YouTube channel , you make a strong case here. 3 years back i used to hire embedded engineers for a startup and would find this problem, people don’t know anything about the compiler , assembler, linker or cpu arch they are working with

    For all people saying it is not important well try to code on a system of RAM size 32Kb , also in that implement DSP algorithms, state machines, peripheral drivers, while keeping current consumption low enough that it can run for 10 days on 50mah battery

    If you don’t know things that @QuanticoCEO has mentioned , you cannot even fucking start to think about it.

    If your concepts are not strong enough a simple i2C driver code will make you weep like a little bitch.
  • 1
    @hardfault YES YES YES THANK YOU!
  • 1
    @AleCx04 yeah all the OOP concepts originated in C... it just isn’t built into the syntax keywords.. C++ was originally just a preprocessor(text replacement) on top of plain old c.... but because the keywords exist in java and c++ and shit everyone thing C you cant do it cuz it doesn’t exist... WRONG.. you just have todo what the c++ language is doing in the background ... attracting away from you...
  • 5
    @hardfault @AleCx04 @vomitmachine I am definitely working on it.. will take some time, lots of stuff to record and plan. But it will be done... and I promise it will bridge the missing gap... I always talk about the “Ah haaa light bulb moment all of my interns have around week6 in their training “ everyone always says why don’t they teach it like this in school.
    It takes 6weeks because I have to 1 tear their false confidence down, 2 I have to get rid of all their bad habits they picked up, 3.begin to teach, show them the correct way to think about programming fill in the missing puzzle pieces and then... finally I build their confidence back up.. and every time the end up with 5x more confidence than beginning but it’s real confidence they understand and they can solve the problem how ever seems most efficient for the task
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO well I would definitely be looking forward to know more about this man! let us know if you do something with it!
  • 3
    Spent some time this week planing out the course(s).. And last night I believe I have figured out the name of the channel and domain.. and all that, it’s definitely narrowed down to 2 names Im still debating on... but won’t announce it until I have bought the domains and made the accounts.. don’t want trolls on here holding up the account or domain hahah
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO damn, you are going full blast on it. I seriously thought you would just go for a YouTube channel in which you would post videos and stuff
  • 1
    @AleCx04 yeah I’ll be posting YouTube videos.. but I figured register the domain, so I have custom email, and then hell down the road, maybe add additional content to a website 🤷🏼‍♂️.. but whatever I do gotta just make sure all the bases are covered so I have to make accounts on anything I think I’m gonna use just to protect the name
  • 1
    Soon folks... ;)
  • 1
    Need a good Logo, Banner etc for youtube and shit...... im a software engineer not a graphic designer... YO... web devs say hi... lol i need y'alls expertise ... i need a graphic made
  • 1
    Coders and monkey testers should die.
    Software engineers and Test Engineers should rule.
  • 0
    @BlueSky Yes yes yes!!!!
  • 0
    I learned coding in a day. Learned programming in a month. My brain is already hardwired to know programming well. And interpret python code.
  • 0
    @QuanticoCEO i think i just facepalmed so hard i gave myself a headache
  • 1
    @TheQWERTYCoder you can take your python and shove it up your ass... no tangible products are written in python. Tangible products are written in C / C++ or assembly... sure you could make some hacked up script or some web module .. but websites only last for so long and are changed often.. but tangible products running software, will continue until the memory modules fail. Python is only useful for hackers, script kiddos, and research labs where they can’t afford to hire real software engineers :)
  • 3
    So I did a quick sample test run to try out the video editing and screen recording and all that shit..

    Obviously the tutorial is shit, that was total impromptu and just being used to test the whole recording and uploading process.

    https://youtu.be/d5Mo1wh6bso
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO Avatar checks out. I liked it and it definitely works well, the editor screen is easy enough to see and follow along, the voice recording is clear (at least from my side I was able to pick up everything you said and understand you perfectly fine) and there is no background noise that can interfere with the content you want to make available. I also think that the frame in which we can see you in the negative filter looks really cool. Makes it seem like a computer generated person will give the tutorials :P

    Overall I say that you initial test was a success man.
  • 1
    @AleCx04 fantastic! That’s exactly what I was hoping for and going for with the inversion. Do you think I should use dark theme editor? Or stay with the white? (Typically I use dark)
    The mic is an akg xlr to a focusrite 2i2 so it suppose to be super clear and not pic up other things. Asweome mic I’ve been using it for web conferenceing during this quarantine.

    I need to create a logo. And work the logo into the intro clip, and probably shorten the intro to no more than 10secs it’s 20 now
  • 0
    @QuanticoCEO Personally I don't have a problem with light themes and the one you are using looks cool and properly highlights the syntax, buuuuuut you know that people will most definitely complain about it eventually. It really is up to you, I do wonder if using a dark theme would impact the negative filter that you are using. I also really like the intro since it conveys what the focus of your teachings will be, one thing that you could do is sort of list the things that will be discussed in the video. It would give people ample time to read as it goes without needing to pause it.

    Thanks for naming the mic also, I have been considering getting one for something similar.
  • 1
    @AleCx04 I’ll probably, switch to dark theme editor.. honestly will probably use vim haven’t entirely decided yet. And the negative filter, on the dark theme would not work, so I would need to negative the negative, to turn it white, instead of black.. or ohhh maybe I’ll make it green. That would be kinda cool. Hmmm lots to think about. And yeah I was thinking about a few other intros, nothing is final yet obviously.. thinking of one like a terminal screen listing of the topics? Or atleast use adobe after effects to present those topics as if it was typed on a terminal.. idk lots idea, very open to criticism, and suggestions from topics to intro ideas
  • 1
    @AleCx04 Here’s the mic and model number
  • 1
    Here’s a different sample, with darker editor, and green inversion, more computer like
    https://youtu.be/wyix2SpZHz4
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO oh man the second video came out absolutely fantastic. Even better in terms of the effects. The dark theme does look nice for sure. Definitely getting that Matrix vibe from the green negative filter. I will be sure to check the mic out and can't wait to see more content man!

    I actually have an idea for the logo, something along the lines of a black/green square, and inside the logo that is basically your avatar, with the long hair and the glasses, but tailored to look like the "person icon" that you see in crosswalk signs. I dunno, I just thought about it and wanted to throw it out there :P
  • 1
    @AleCx04 a logo idea came to me last night similar to yours but mine is this... take the PPE icon the face with the safety glasses... redraw it all in illustrator, replace safety glasses with my squarer glasses, put crazy hair on top.. turn it neon green... draw a circle of 1s and 0s around the image as a border. Then curve the text The Software to the top left quad of the circle out side it .. sage will go to bottom right corner curved around the circle
  • 1
    @AleCx04 just threw this together, needs some touching up and adding sage to the bottom right but I don’t know how to make the text curve correctly... right now every time I do it it’s upside down...
  • 2
    Here is a candidate for the logo
  • 1
    @QuanticoCEO this looks so fucking amazing man. It is exactly what I had in mind really. Give authorship of who the man behind the content is really. And adds that proper hacker mindset to it. Hacker not in the sense of script kiddies that just know their way around metasploit. But of the original MIT hacker term conceived by the people that thought differently in terms of what software can do, bending shit to their will. My C skills can't bring anything to you, but if you need a web developer then my friend "YOU HAVE MY AXE!"
  • 0
    @QuanticoCEO And just to let you know how dedicated I am for this, cuz I really want to shift focus: Been developing websites since 2010 primarily in PHP but have dealt with Node.js, Java (with Spring Boot) Rails, Django, Flask, Laravel, Lumen and all additional manners possible of frameworks. I am also the primary data science guy for my institution, but all of these feels too bleak compared to what a true embedded software engineer needs to go through on the daily basis. Yeah I am no novice to Software Engineering, or Computer Science for that matter. I have applications deployed on Clojure and Python alike, PHP, JS and Java as well as VB.NET, C# and VBScript. My primary focus is on PHP, but I am willing to make the change. As I said, you need a web dev? I can assist.
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    @AleCx04 thanks dude! I will definitely look to you regarding web dev stuff, shoot me an email chris@thesoftwaresage.com send some portfolio stuff if you have it. But other than that, yeah, I definitely don’t wanna do the website myself if I get to the point where a website would be needed for this.. still trying to think about use cases where it could build a community / following around it. Reposting the tutorials or content to the website seems slightly redundant which is why I’m trying to find another use case or “next level”...

    I use todo web dev stuff as a hobby. Back when static pages were more popular... then everyone started using Wordpress, and square space and wix. And that’s pretty much when the “keys” were handed over to the consumer eliminating a lot of hoppyist web dev.. and giving all the work to front end people, with cookie cuter backends... now it’s either you are a professional web dev for a company doing backend stuff and advanced application stuff or just a front end guy modifying Wordpress,wix and shitspace... all while the person thinks that is what web dev / building a website and Architecting a website is all about.. total bullshit.

    Anyway rant over, yeah hopefully my content help you learn C and more. And it would be awesome to get you involved if I decide todo a website. Ideas, suggestions are welcome.
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    @AleCx04 oh wow impressive skill set, kudos to you, I know enough PHP, and Perl and the rest to be dangerous.

    Never worked in closure, or ruby or some of the other stuff you mentioned.

    A week ago or so I did consider a website for later down the road when the tutorials have gotten to the point of high level languages to make a series of content where I create the website... in the videos

    But then I was like ehh my skills for web dev are not up to par I’ll leave that to someone else
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