6
Lor-inc
34d

[!dev], [toasters]
Does everyone only ever toast perfectly uniform slices of bread?
My grandma has a toaster that has two doors which open to the side and are held closed by a spring. This way if a slice is too thick the door can't close properly, but the damn thing still works. It's from before ww2, like most dead simple devices that work surprisingly well. I can't find anything similar anymore. The only two types now are the top-loaded design that simply doesn't work with thick slices, and the version for Americans or families of twelve that is the form factor of a smaller oven. (Which I obviously don't have room for. I already have an oven.)

Btw, how should I tag this? It's a rant, but it has nothing to do with the platform except perhaps the undocumented dependency between toasters and bread slicing machines.

Comments
  • 4
    I don't eat white bread at all. Problem solved. ^^
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop You can toast brown bread, you just don't get to do the marmite thing.
  • 4
    I saw a (sadly no joke) linux-based toaster that allowed you to adjust the temperature and time. You slid the bread between two pieces of glass so you could actually see how toasted it was.

    But since you could adjust both time and temperature, it would work for any thickness. And if you really wanted, you could probably hook up a weight sensor and have the toaster automatically determine the best temp for toasting.

    Linux toaster.
    Yep.
    It looked amazing though!
  • 0
    @Root My slices are so weird they only work with something that doesn't expect them to be flat.
  • 2
    @Lor-inc Fhtagn! Non-euclidean bread!
  • 1
    "undocumented dependency between toasters and bread slicing machines" -- that is awesome.

    Now I'll be on the lookout for unwritten assumptions behind real-world artifacts working together.
  • 0
    @dotnope Like this one, most can only be noticed after failing to use a device because you're unable to manually do something with sufficient accuracy. Many people can slice bread properly, in this case.
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