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THE HOLY GRAIL BOOK OF COMPUTER SCIENCE HAS ARRIVED!

52 years old and the book set is still not complete

Comments
  • 5
    A lot of C/C++ books I see
  • 0
    Fascile 6 and MMIX supplement still en route?
  • 0
    @SortOfTested yes actually LOL
  • 0
    @SortOfTested amazon only shipped half the order
  • 0
    Are those books worth the money? I have other books that cover those subjects already.
  • 5
    @Demolishun
    They're pretty good overall, but should be read at an adept level.

    The entire thing is purely abstract, so you'll need be the type of person who benefits from pure theory. The unskippable bit to me is fascile 6; it's one of the best academic analyses of Boolean satisfiability ever written.
  • 2
    @Demolishun the art of computer programming is not a cheap set
  • 0
    @QuanticoCEO just saw that the set goes for 176 for only 1-4, wondering why 5 is not included in the box set.

    I am surprised to not see the K&R book in there btw unless it is hidden somewhere else :P
  • 2
    @AleCx04 yeah I’m it sure why it’s not part of the set either, same with 6 and the supplement .. I do not own the K&R book, I’ve read it soo many times, other people’s copy, I had the pdf.. it’s one of those books I’ve read so many times that I just have a hard time spending 50bucks for a physical copy... LOL!

    It’s the one book that I should have but don’t have very ironic I don’t have that one lol
  • 2
    @AleCx04 @QuanticoCEO
    They're not part of the box set because they're 2/3rds of volume 4b. GRRM doesn't hold a candle to knuth in terms of "finish the damn book!" 😉
  • 3
    @QuanticoCEO I got it and thought to myself "meh its less than 200 pages, this is going to be a cakewalk"

    but then I found out it has exercises. They are not the most complex things in the universe, but the bad thing about me and excercises is that once I complete one I need to find 50 different ways to do them.
  • 1
    @SortOfTested haha true

    @AleCx04 yeah I really need to get it and go thru the book again for shits and giggles
  • 1
    @AleCx04 but I want the hard cover version and it’s even more expensive
  • 1
    I am considering buying iPad pro, i see Apple Pencil, is it worth it ? . I draw a lot of flow chart and logic, equations before I actually code how god is a work flow of Apple Pencil + iPad as compared to good’ol white board ?
    I am guessing you might be using it in your work flow
  • 2
    @QuanticoCEO a coworker(dude is reaching 65) and my boss(68) both say they have the original editions. I have not seen them, but they recognized the C programming book in my shelf at work and told me about having the first and second editions in hardcover. They seem to have lots of treasures from back in the day.
  • 2
    @hardfault I’m the same way, I flow chart and do all my brainstorming on a whiteboard prior to writing code. I also use the white board a lot in general conversation with the team, before me the team didn’t even use white boards... then I came and I installed an entire wall of whiteboards floor to ceiling ... the ceiling being about 20 feet, (yes we do have a rolling latter lol.) and now the team uses it all the time, lol.

    Anyway the iPad... I bought it for exactly that reason and for storing digital copies of all the books. And notes in general

    I just got the iPad about 2 weeks ago absolutely love it with the pencil... I didn’t think the pencil was a big deal until I used it WOW.. definitely wouldn’t draw and whiteboard without it.

    I use a few different apps one bring concepts which is like an infinite drawing space. I use air server to stream from my iPad to the my computer and then use MS teams / webex (fuck zoom) to interface with my team so it really ends up being a virtual whiteboard.

    Unlike the whiteboard now I have a digital copy. And then they have other apps todo uml and other flow charts which is nice I can sit on the deck and draw up my thoughts. Works great for notes too.

    Definitely a great investment
  • 1
    @AleCx04 yeah my mentor had the book in hardcover as well, right next to his desk. (He worked at bell labs as an intern under K&R) so I’m in a way 1 hop away having been taught by K&R as my mentor worked under them! Lol
  • 0
    I would give that honour to SICP or something, but yeah, nice
    Hooray for Asian editions which cost nothing, comparatively.

    Also check out Concrete Mathematics by Knuth and co., great for practical CS-y maths
  • 1
    @RememberMe concrete mathematics is in the mail, and SICP ( I’ve read a lot of it on pdf, amazing book and class I’ve seen on YouTube, so I had to buy the physical thing) both normal and teacher edition are in the mail, as well as the algorithms book(the big one)

    I also have the dragon compiler book on the way too, the first edition. I’ll buy the second edition later.
  • 1
    @RememberMe I also have Concepts, Techniques, and Models of Computer Programming book ( sequel to SICP) in the Cart waiting to go
  • 1
    @RememberMe one thing is for sure, I’ve taken the extra available time at home during covid since I don’t have to waste 3 hours a day drive to work and another 2 hours a day prepping for work I now have converted that time to “reading” lol

    The thing I love the most about this industry is it doesn’t matter how good you are, how long you’ve been doing it, or anything.. there’s always more always other things, different theories and ways of looking at things.

    The whole sicp book crazy being able to go 200 something pages with no fucken assignment statement and I didn’t even notice until the book literally points it out.. and I was legit following along. Didn’t even cross my mind, defiantly gave me a different prospective on things.

    The other thing that is crazy is the knowledge that is stored away in these “older” books, that plain and simple is just not taught any more. Or exposed to.

    It’s like completing a really good game and then realizing there’s like hundreds of more DLCs to buy that allow you to play certain parts of the game again but from another prospective or even play parts again but with different twists or whatever (and I’m not talking about other languages) lol,

    At the end of the day, everything is just an abstraction and it’s all recursion lol
  • 2
    @QuanticoCEO I got a brand new one (K&R) for 70 on my birthday last year still worth every penny
  • 0
    @QuanticoCEO nice list. I agree wholly with the DLC bit.

    Fair warning though, while the dragon book is great in terms of information content, it's not the greatest in terms of pedagogy and presentation (especially the chapters from machine independent optimization, downright frustrating at times). I got Engineering a Compiler by Cooper and Torczon and much preferred its presentation.

    I also loved Pearls of Functional Algorithm Design by Richard Bird, reminds me of Programming Pearls but in SML/Haskell. Pretty dense, but ideas are great. Also Purely Functional Data Structures by Okasaki. Also dense but great ideas. Also Types and Programming Languages by Benjamin Pierce. Extremely dense but great ideas. Also Programming Erlang by Joe Armstrong. Very cool DLC :p (not sure if you're into functional programming but these really do force you into new perspectives).

    If you like graphics, I loved Realtime Rendering by Akenine-Moller et. al. and Physically Based Rendering: from Theory to Implementation by Pharr et. al., both are incredible and up-to-date books with a ton of juicy info. Also both are great examples of how to write a damn textbook, especially PBRT (dragon book could learn a thing or two from them...)

    Also, since you're on the hunt for classics, Linkers and Loaders by John Levine. Old and pretty much the only book of its kind.
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