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neeno
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WHY THE FUCK DO MY TEACHERS KEEP USING SHITTY TRANSLATIONS FOR PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS?! Like dude, everything related to programming is in english, just use the fucking terms in english for fucks sake. There are some words like "array" that fit into portuguese sentences without needing translation, so why translate it?

Why do you use acronyms in portuguese? People in the Database Systems class will later read a lot the acronym DBMS but won't know what the fuck that is because they teach the acronym SGBD, which is a translation.

It's so cringy and useless, so many terms the students will have to translate back to english when they get out to the real world because everything related to programming is in english.

"oh but what if the person doesn't know english" you don't even have to know english, just associate the concept (which will be explained to you in your language) with an english word. Also if you don't know english you'll have a very hard time, so I'd suggest taking english classes as your electives.

Ok I'm done, I got it out of my system.

Comments
  • 3
    I think there is something behind it. The first thing to come to mind is that teachers try to explain concepts and comparing terms in your native language is probably more helpful to create an instant association between the words. Another thing that might be involved is the national preference for the language. There was a big event in Israel called "War of the languages". It was basically a fight about which language to use in the first university, since they didn't have all the technical words yet. Now one of the arguments for using hebrew was that teaching in the language will help the population not to feel disconnected from the scholars, and also help them feel they can be both hebrew speakers and scientists. I personally don't think these arguments are relevant in the 21st century, but I suppose many governments still think that way or similarly- putting the ideal before the technics
  • 1
    That sounds well for me when people divert away from language monopoly in teaching, unless the translation is seriously ugly as hell (but again it's subjective). Even if practically you get to work with English-rich systems, you'll probably end up talking to your native fellows about it.
    And while you're at it, mixing two locales in the sentence makes sense only for language lessons, IMHO, not for documentation you'd like to read as a newcomer.
  • 1
    It's universal thing. Well, except US and England.

    These teachers and professors are men from 1980's. Science was done locally, so local words were used. They still don't use internet. They use World Wide Web.

    They don't use words like "bit" or "byte". They'll say "two-state minimal information storage unit". And if the student is completely confused after the class, they win. They are superior intellectuals.
  • 1
    I agree. Also a collateral benefit is that you get to pronounce an english word badly among colleagues which makes for a cheap laugh. I love the effect of pronouncing a sticky mushy english word in solid straight spanish vocals.
  • 0
    @vintprox If you're this new to programming (just learning arrays), you're not reading any documentation yet. And if you're reading documentation, there's a 9 out of 10 chance that it's in english anyway. I also prefer documentation in english, even though I live in Brazil. Idk, IMO english fits better with programing. I also hate how teachers also use variable and function names in portuguese.

    I don't see a problem with mixing languages in the same sentence. No one that's serious about programming here uses the translation to "array" in a sentence, we just say "array". Some words fit better than others. "Stack" and "heap" fit well, "linked list" not so much. It depends a lot on the word itself, but in most cases I prefer the english word.
  • 1
    That has fucked me in important exams at least once or twice. "Explain [weird-ass translation I have never heard of before]" and I have no idea what they want from me, only to later realize that they have meant [actually used English word].
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