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yashdayma
23d

Hello I am beginner in coding I have a doubt about sentinel search means can anyone give me a small example so that I can understand it properly

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  • 5
    There isn't a "sentinel search" or "sentinel linear search" algorithm per se. That's mostly a poor translation courtesy of the bloat of unauthoritative plagiarized garbage floating around the internet.

    A "sentinel node" is a value in a series or tree intentionally inserted at the end of the iterable series so that the result of the search will always return a value.

    The word sentinel means a guard. The function of the sentinel value is to guard against null matches.

    A linear search with a sentinel node will terminate with the query value. That value will then be returned at index n+1 if no other matches
    are found:
    find: "10"
    source series: 1,2,3
    n+1 series: 1,2,3,10

    f(x,l) -> [...l,x].find(x);
  • 3
    @SortOfTested And the point of that is to safely omit range checks, which makes shit going faster.
  • 0
    Okay,
    I will admit, i dont know what the talk is about, or i wont pretend i know shit about algorithms, but this sounds like null termination on string thing?
  • 0
    @DubbaThony That's a termination character, not a sentinel. The sentinel value is always the one you're looking for.
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop

    Okay, if you remove abstraction wtf that means?

    Edit: i mean like usage or something..

    Like example

    Edit2:
    Okay, i googled it, and apparently yes, null termination character is sentiel value. But thats not algorithm or anything like that, just concept.
  • 1
    @DubbaThony It's not a sentinel. The big difference is that with a sentinel, you ONLY check for the value you're looking for when going through the data. With null termination, you look for a certain character or pattern and STILL have to do the null check.
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop

    Okay, well, makes sense.
    Google aint allways right and im too tired to filter that all. Just got curious, never heared of that thing and it sounded intriguing
  • 0
    @SortOfTested thank u for your help it really helped me
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