48
linuxxx
21d

So apparently someone discovered an exploit in iOS devices which would make shitloads of devices jailbreakable and it can't be updated due to the chip being read-only.

I'm not an expert on this by far but hereby a source:
https://idownloadblog.com/2019/09/...

Again, I'm not an expert on this but it does seem awesome that a lot of devices (if I read it correctly) are jailbreakable now (when someone developed one with this exploit)!

Comments
  • 16
    Yeah I read this too. All software is trash and all software engineers are severely stupid (self included) were entering an age where everything is going to be vulnerable, and I wish I could say it was a conspiracy but honestly it’s just people not testing and fuzzing their software
  • 5
    @FrodoSwaggins I was expecting a defensive comment from you (defending apple) O_o
  • 11
    @linuxxx I never defend Apple. I just don’t allow people to favorably compare google to them. Google is clearly evil a few orders of magnitude above apple
  • 4
    @FrodoSwaggins I agree with you on google itself although not on Android (or, the true open source forks thereof like AOSP and Lineage)
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins Although, I guess it depends on what points you compare them on...
  • 4
    @linuxxx I would say I also don’t like it when people say things that are demonstrably false. Like when people say Linux sucks because it’s hard to use. It’s not. There are plenty of valid reasons to dislike Apple stuff but a lot of the reasons I hear are not good reasons imo
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins My concerns with Ubuntu were that applications are not consistent and a lot of things I love aren't available. Everything installs a different way, WINE isn't flawless, shortcuts confused me (adding things to the dock - it seems like some apps could easily be added, others required some work, and some seemed impossible but I'm sure I was just missing something), etc. I wanted to like Ubuntu, but here I am back on my Mac lol.

    Glad to have Querious back!
  • 2
    @linuxxx I have android up until the iPhone X. I always thought I would stay exclusive to Android but the Note's explosive battery forced me to try the LG V20 which I was extremely disappointed by. I gave the iPhone a chance after that and I'm unlikely to go back. 2 years later, my phone still runs like it did on day-1...Android slowed down after a year no matter what I did...I would reinstall the O.S., flash some custom ROMs, etc and it just never worked as well. I hate that I can't write an iOS app to read SMS, but I'm also glad no one else can. I like that iOS apps are sandboxed better and can't crash the phone like they do on Android (or at least the way they used to...maybe they've improved in 2 years?).

    Android suffers from the same problem as Windows...too many hardware configurations to take into consideration. Apple has done a great job at keeping up quality by limiting variations.
  • 0
    Ugh. Walked away and then came back and noticed my typos I can't fix.
  • 1
    @Stebner55 agree with you on your Android rant but very confused by your Linux comments. What does it even mean for applications to be consistent? That doesn’t sound like it has any meaning at all. Also, /everything/ installs the same way in Ubuntu, that’s one of the great things about most Linux distros. I’m so confused that you’re claiming the ppposite. If anything, installing shit on Mac and windows is the Wild West in comparison to Ubuntu. Wine isn’t flawless but it’s more flawless than windows and that said I have only ever failed to run two applications in wine, I’ve run insane shit in wine no problem. Anyway, very confused by those comments.
  • 1
    @Stebner55 Don't know much about the Android issues. I've had very well working android phones for years and years, my current phone runs at exactly the same speed after about 1,5 years.

    Obviously rooted because I want control over as much as possible.

    I've tried iOS but for one its about impossible to manage that iPhone with my Linux system(s) and for two, its insanely hard to do simple things like copying its pictures to my system or copying music or importing/exporting contacts...
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins

    Mac is either double-click to install or drag and drop in your application folder.

    Windows is either double-click to install or double-click to run (portable app).

    Ubuntu is sometimes a portable app, sometimes an installable one, sometimes you need to build it, and I feel like there's a 4th option...
  • 0
    @FrodoSwaggins

    WINE apps I tried and had too many problems with:

    FLIRCloud: Can't open more than 2 streams at a time or it crashes. Might be something that could be solved by increasing RAM allocation (never got that far)

    HeidiSQL: buttons are black and you don't know what they do without just hitting them lol

    Diablo 3: Didn't work.
  • 0
    @linuxxx

    I understand completely, and the eco-system is why I am such a fan of the iPhone (using a mac). I have access to iMessage on my computer for SMS, I can send files in a split second using AirDrop, etc. If you're using a different computer operating system, I can understand why a different phone would be easier for you.
  • 0
    @FrodoSwaggins

    Oh regarding consistency, I mainly meant consistency of installation. The UI/UX is comparable to any consistency/inconsistency on Mac/Windows.

    I did get frustrated with the window management. The close/minimize/fullscreen functionality (or lack thereof).

    Oh another thing that wasn't compatible was Logitech Options for my MX Master 2s mouse. I couldn't program the middle button to be an app switcher...huge efficiency problem for me. Someone in a forum got it mapped, but it looked difficult.
  • 0
    @Stebner55 Ubuntu with installing apps:

    - .deb file: double click or through terminal.
    - .AppImage file (self contained one): same as the deb file.
    - Installable through the 'app store': either using the graphical store application or apt/apt-get (or others)
    - Compiling: well... if you really want to....
  • 0
    @Stebner55 As for the eco system, I don't trust closed source/properietary systems enough to run them, thus I don't use windows/Mac.
  • 0
    @linuxxx

    Yea, I forgot about app store and apt/apt-get...I knew there was a 4th lol.

    Compiling was required for some of the things I was using. I can't remember which.
  • 0
    @Stebner55 I've had to compile stuff as well but that was definitely power user stuff, nothing a normal user would touch (and as a server engineer...)
  • 0
    @linuxxx

    I'm sure it was something for programming.
  • 0
    @linuxxx @FrodoSwaggins

    Ubuntu had a few things I miss. The biggest was my NAS SMB connection was super fast because it was Linux to Linux. The next was running a native web server. The third was apps snapping on the screen. You can get applications to mimic that on Mac, but it's not the same (personally, I use Moom).

    I can't remember which app I couldn't download and I don't feel like looking it up, but either Dashlane or Authy didn't work on Ubuntu. I'm leaning towards Dashlane because I think Authy worked better on there than on my Mac. If that's the case, Dashlane did work in the browser...there just wasn't a downloadable app and that was frustrating.
  • 1
    Hah apple tripped on their own laces
  • 0
    @Stebner55 I guess you evaluate the things you use differently than me :)

    I wouldn't use authy solely because it isn't open source and has quite a security impact. That's also the reason that I refuse to use windows and Mac.

    Luckily, at my last job we (the engineers) all used Linux because the boss didn't want closed source software in our prod environment due to security reasons (1000+ servers).

    I now quit and am at home the entire day with a PC with 6 monitors running Kubuntu!
  • 2
    @Stebner55 if you didn’t know how to install software on Ubuntu I could see how you would think that but there’s a package manager.m, which is massively superior to what you just listed for windows and Mac and it’s all I’ve ever had to use.

    Also, all of those options exist and that’s my experience with Mac and windows...
  • 0
    @Stebner55 diablo 3 worked for me.
  • 1
    @Stebner55 I’m so confused there is maximize minimize functionality but I specifically switched to a window manager that doesn’t have that because using a mouse is terrible.
  • 0
    @FrodoSwaggins

    Package managers only support packages in their library. Many of the applications I use aren't available.
  • 0
    @FrodoSwaggins

    I'm speaking from shitty fallible human memory. I forget what window feature didn't exist. Just googled it and I see window minimize. I know I didn't like the side of the window the buttons are on. I can't remember what feature was lacking.
  • 0
    @FrodoSwaggins @linuxxx

    I hope neither of you think this is some kind of Mac > Linux debate because it's not. At least not on my end. Everyone's experience will vary based on their needs, the tools they prefer, the things they're used to, their personal preferences, their security concerns, the hardware they have, the peripherals they use, etc. I think all operating systems are great for the most part. I've been able to use all of them at some point in my life. At this point, I prefer my Mac. Everything "just works" and all the tools I need are here. My complaints are minimal (like having to install brew). It also interacts really well with my phone. Your mileage will vary.
  • 0
    @linuxxx

    I've got a 38" ultrawide with a 2015 Macbook Pro (IMO the best laptop ever made) in a dock. I've also got a 48" 4k TV on the wall hooked up to my 2014 custom built PC (Which is where I have run all 3 operating systems. Originally built as a hackintosh, but got sick of issues with audio/networking and kernel panics even though I used hardware recommended by TonyX86). My custom build has a few hard drives, each with their own operating system and an Oculus Rift. I also have a Synology DS1019+ with several drives on my network.

    I've been working out of my home for a year and a half now and did it for years prior to my last job.
  • 0
    @Stebner55 yeah but I don’t understand a lot of the points you’re making. Like I said above about iOS there are reasons not to like something but there are also invalid reasons not to like something and I’m not getting it from what you’re saying.

    For example, I’m no longer a Linux user and I’m on openbsd because I’m not happy with the direction that most userlands are headed with systemd and I got tired of rolling my own, plus I approve of the kernel development process in openbsd a lot more and I find it has less feature bloat and fewer nasty performance hacks.

    But I hear this argument all the time that people say software is hard to install on Linux when it’s in fact easier than anything else, and then when pressed why it’s because they are trying to install some shitty windows app like Spotify. The point of Linux is to get out of the jail of crap proprietary apps.

    I still use macOS for my studio at home and pro tools, so I’m not saying that these os don’t have a place (though windows doesn’t have a place to be frank) but for the 99% use case virtually everything is available in the repos, and the only stuff that isn’t frequently isn’t for a reason (like it’s proprietary spyware that they don’t want to show you the source code for that reason. Think Spotify and Skype.)
  • 0
    @FrodoSwaggins

    You can't invalidate an opinion. It's not like I said "Nothing can be installed, that's why I hate it". In that case, yes, I would be wrong, but saying I don't like the inconsistency of how apps are installed (aka, they're not solely available in a package manager, they're not all available pre-compiled, and developers take for granted that most linux users are power users), is not something you can discredit. It's an opinion. I never said I found it difficult to install things. I did admit I had trouble with shortcuts but didn't necessarily knock Ubuntu for that. They could certainly make it easier though.

    You obviously have a deeper understanding and care more about the inner-workings than 98% of people. You can say you find our reasons petty, but we could say the same. Petty is relative. If a computer turns on and runs an app allowing me to do what I need to do and make money, then it's fine. Unless of course there are severe performance or security issues.
  • 0
    @FrodoSwaggins

    I wouldn't say windows doesn't have a place. I would say that if it weren't for the marketshare (and developers/companies focused more on Mac/Linux) it would probably not be as popular as it is today. Windows 10 is a massive improvement over older versions (with maybe the exception of 7), but I think they're headed in the direction of "operating system as a service" and I'm not a fan. I believe this because they have full control over pushing updates at any time and I have a feeling they will start charging monthly if they can get people to pay (thus the free upgrades from 8 to 10...IMO).
  • 0
    At the end of the day, it's really a "if you build it, they will come" kinda situation. If most apps and games work on an operating system, people will use it.

    Windows has that going for it, Mac is second, and Linux is usually neglected unless they write their app to be run from a container that works on all three (like Java or Electron). Companies can't always justify spending money on development for an operating system that has the least marketshare. There's also something to be said for higher quality software being built if it's built specifically for a single operating system (less variables and potential for bugs). This goes back to my comment about Apple having a small variety of products and focusing on quality.

    I avoid Windows when possible, but still need it to use my Oculus. I never tried to set it up on WINE, but it seems like it wouldn't be ideal.

    I'm hoping Mac and Linux get more exclusives so people will migrate.
  • 0
    @FrodoSwaggins

    You said essentially everything runs in WINE for you. What's your trick? Don't tell me it "just works". And are you really satisfied with the performance and UI of all your apps? HeidiSQL looked like shit.
  • 0
    I will say I feel more comfortable in Ubuntu than I do on my Mac or Windows when it comes to terminal and writing scripts. I do it all day long on Ubuntu server, so it's something I'm used to. Using apt, cron, logrotate, supervisor, etc.
  • 0
    @FrodoSwaggins This is a hardware level exploit not a software level one. This has nothing with people "not testing their software".
  • 0
    @FrodoSwaggins well Windows pcs cost way less than macOS and do the same thing. And BTW outside USA windows dominate the market.
  • 0
    @irene

    Are you sure? I didn’t read the article but it sounds like the firmware on the chip has a security hole that can’t be patched because the chip is physically set to readonly. I can’t really imagine a scenario where hardware without code (software) would be exploitable?..
  • 0
    @NarkoCat PCs cost less if you are willing to take some compromises. If you look at comparable build quality and specs then the price gap narrows. Basically you can make choices about what is an acceptable tradeoff for a decreased price. On the PC side it is very challenging to find a computer that is well balanced because it seems like all of them have at least one weakness that may help bring the price down.
  • 0
    @irene But that's the thing that I don't need to spend lots of money if I don't need a high end computer, I can get a laptop for 300 euros and will be able to code just fine on it. There is no way you will get a Mac for anything close to that. Atleast here. Don't know about other countries.
  • 0
    @NarkoCat A Mac with those specs starts at 800-900 euro here.

    If I'd want one with my specs I'd be at around 4-5K, EXCLUDING peripherals (I've got a 6 monitor setup so yeah...)

    Built my current one for about 600 euro (amd 8 cores, 24gb ram, amd video card with 6 outputs, 128gb ssd + 2tb hdd)
  • 0
    One of the key things to note is that you can't pick your hardware configuration to save money on Mac like you can with Windows or Linux. You can pick AMD processors and Crucial SSDs, which are significantly cheaper.
  • 0
    @Stebner55 I was thinking of laptops TBH. With desktop computers I would pick normal PC hardware every time. No trade off there.
  • 1
    @Stebner55 off topic but Diablo 3 not working for you could almost be treated as a feature :)

    - Diablo 1 and 2 gang

    @FrodoSwaggins I hope you weren't too scarred by it (or did you actually like D3?)
  • 1
    @RememberMe I’m d2 through and through don’t worry
  • 0
    @RememberMe

    I played the hell outta D2 LOD. My wife bought me D3 and I barely played so I was trying to get back into it to make her happy.
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