13
Defi4NT
4y

Been trying to learn code for almost two years now, started with C++, took a break because I couldn't figure out what to do with the knowledge, started Python 'cause I thought I'd be inspired by scripting and automating stuff, same thing happened, switched to java, same problem, aaaaaand I'm back to C++ and still can't figure out what the fuck I can do, I don't code anything and I'm tired of following tutorial in the hope of getting something interesting done
Long rant I know but fuck I'm so depressed about that...

Comments
  • 13
    Go onto github. Find a project implemented in one of the languages you know. Download it. Figure out how to compile and run it. Find another project on github that tries to do something similar, and repeat. Determine the relative advantages of one product over another, pick out features you'd like to combine and add them into either project or create your own mashup of the two.

    Too many people try to reinvent the wheel. Don't do that.... Master artists learn from copying other masters.
  • 5
    Now that's a great answer thank you for taking the time to read and respond
    I will definitely try that
    Thank you so much for this
  • 2
    Take a look at freelancer sites. A pic an interesting topic. Build it. Do this a couple of times. If you can finish the project in a reasonal amount of time you can actually think about making some pocket money. Always pick small projects that you estimate are done in a few hours. Then go into the real work and get some experience with our beloved customers
  • 2
    Do you have a real concrete project in mind ? This is I think more important than the language you'll choose. What you need most is a clear objective. And make it very small at first. Then maybe try to do the same thing in other languages and see which one you're more comfortable with.
  • 3
    One issue for me when I was learning was that even though tutorials are great and explain stuff well, they are not the best because it's hard to find one with a practical objective. What really helped me gain a concrete understanding of coding were the cool ideas I wanted to make. For example, when I saw in 10th or 11th grade, I made a website that was like the online version of iTunes. It was not too difficult to write, and it was interesting to me, which motivated me to want to learn and understand what I was typing so I could finish the project.

    I suggest the same. Come up with a cool project idea, and develop it. Tutorials are boring and can be a pain to follow.
  • 2
    I'm kind of in the same situation. What I try to do is focus on a specific domain, like backend web development. If you know some python, you could start learning django, and with a little html and Javascript, you can start making websites. Now, you will also have to deal with databases and deployment but... At least you'll be making a concrete thing. I guess this is your problem right now, you are not focusing on a domain.
    Another idea, if you like c++ more, would be to learn QT, to make desktop applications.
    That way you'll be both making valuable things to be proud of, and using the language constantly.
    Anyway, the important thing is that you know that you want to be a programmer, you'll figure out everything else. ☺️
  • 3
    Sounds to me like you're aimlessly learning languages. I suggest you spend some time thinking of something you want to build (or maybe something simple your friends would want you to build if you're out of ideas) and then build it!

    It's much more motivating to build an actual product and it's a valuable learning experience. It doesn't have to change the world, as long as you want to build it. Maybe a super simple game? Maybe reminders app? Maybe try to use a cool api online?
  • 1
    I have a job in IT yes
    I think I have an idea for a project
    My friend is always complaining about Skype and I thought I'd make a small voice chat for me and him
    That's a good place to start I guess
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