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It's nice to be back in DevRant after a year, any students like me that are still using C#?

Comments
  • 3
    I'm not a student, but I still make a lot of money using C#, among other things.
  • 0
    @SortOfTested I'm just scared that when I get out of school, new C# devs would be rare
  • 3
    @reiniellematt
    It's gonna be mostly enterprise drudgery.
  • 0
    But .NET Core is cool
  • 2
    @reiniellematt
    It is. Microsoft unfortunately doesn't have a lot of penetration at the intersection of their tech and interesting work. They focused almost entirely on enteprise for 30 years, and that's where they're embedded.

    I had to start my own company to do things I cared about
  • 2
    Im also stuck in c# enterprise. I would love to work wit core but "legacy projects". 🙄
  • 2
    Aye! Cool!
  • 1
    @reiniellematt Plenty of C# jobs around, but as said already, they're often not that fun. I've seen more interesting startups use Java these days, which is similar enough to Java that you could transfer to it if need be.

    It's interesting how these things flip - 10 years ago it was kind of the opposite, the .NET jobs were cool, and Java jobs were enterprise crap. These days when comparing I'm much more taken by the Java opportunities, so that's where I've based my career for the time being.
  • 1
    @AlmondSauce but C# came with a lot of new tools to use such as Blazor, .NET Core. Almost all of its new tools and products are open-source, I don't know why it became boring
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    @reiniellematt No idea either. It could be that it flips round the other way again, but these things often take time. Or not, sometimes. Adoption of languages is about as unpredictable as it gets.
  • 1
    @reiniellematt
    Honestly, Blazor is enterprise-centric cancer. It's raison d'etre is to allow people who don't want to learn to stagnate on what little tech they know as long as possible and continue to call themselves "full-stack."

    It won't ever go anywhere because its deployment scenario is prohibitive. It's a way for people who don't want to learn JavaScript to write sub-par SPA applications. There's architectural holes in its update models that can't be filled, and it won't be competitive on the web until they rewrite mono, or modularize the dotnet core runtime in a way that is a reasonable web payload (read: not gonna happen). As a server-side instrument, it's slower than razor pages and is a solution looking for a problem.

    Tl;Dr If you follow the Blazor path, enteprise is your only future.

    Modern "alt.net" are the people who love dotnet core, but are also accomplished with Typescript, Java, Python, etc and usually are adept at Angular and React, among other things. We're looking for good technology and ideas regardless of where they originate and have a deep understanding of the reasons those ideas tech work where others are middling and insufficient.
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