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So this one time I had to take an online driving school to get my ticket waved from my driving record.

When I signed up for the course they asked a ton of sickeningly personal questions, clearly a shameless grab for personal information. So naturally I lied horribly on every one.

So two weeks later I’m taking the course, and suddenly it jumps to a page where it demands that I regurgitate one of the answers in less than 60 seconds to verify that it’s the same person who signed up taking the course.

FUCK THESE ASSHOLES RIGHT!?

So I’m freaking out, and at the last second I manage to guess it. But I knew it was going to do this for all the questions so I know it’s only the beginning

So for the remaining four hours of torture, I try my best to concentrate on the course when I’m in total fear of being asked a question that I can’t repeat my bullshit answer for. The questions keep coming and I keep managing to guess my bullshit. I was able to get through it at the end of the day

Seriously am mad about that. Not only was it several hours of severe emotional distress with hard financial and legal consequences, they basically held legal action up for ransom to get my personal info, and didn’t even tell me!

FUCK THESE GUYS.

I’m proud to say they didn’t get away with anything new on me though. The buck stops with Frodo swaggins

Comments
  • 10
    Is this in the US? I've found it distressingly common for companies to ask for private information here for literally no reason.
  • 6
  • 13
    That's rough, I feel you though. In situations like these, I've found so few questions apply:

    Q:Where did you live growing up?
    A:Hourly motels
    Q: PLEASE ENTER A VALID ADDRESS
    A: 100 areuforrealdawg ave

    Q: What was the model of your first car?
    A: LTD
    Q: PLEASE ENTER A VALID CAR
    A: Ford LTD
    Q: SPACES ARE NOT ALLOWED
    A: Yugofuckurself

    Q: what is your favorite food
    A: sushi
    Q: PLEASE USE REAL FOOD
    A: πŸ†πŸ‘¦and the πŸ‡ on
  • 7
    Like ten years ago, traffic stopped suddenly on the freeway (75mph to 0) and I couldn't stop in time, so I rear ended someone. I opted to take a course to remove the point from my license. Looking back I totally didn't need to, but whatever.

    The course's website did a whitelisted browser check and one of two immediate redirects depending on results. The problem was nobody had updated the whitelist in like another ten years, meaning it was seriously checking for IE 5, Netscape Navigator, and the like. Chrome and Firefox weren't even on the list despite being out for years.

    So just navigating to the site required a very carefully-timed [esc] to stop the loading, and inspecting the js and markup to see where I was actually supposed to go.

    I'd say I was surprised nobody noticed this, but government everything tends to be stuck in the distant past so they could probably use it just fine. πŸ™„
  • 4
    @Root
    So true. I can't count the number of times I've had to mitm and sed payloads to get around that type of low effort garbage.
  • 3
    @SortOfTested @BobbyTables

    Q: What's your mother's maiden name?
    A: Momma ';drop table users;--
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