81

Pi day you say? Must be an american thing with that date format.

Comments
  • 17
    I agree our time format is strange. My favorite is year month day hour minute second milliseconds, largest to smallest, nice and tidy.
  • 12
    @gorsamp as for programming i agree. As for reading, i prefer the EU way
  • 5
    So April 31st is pi day in all of the countries that format the date wrong? ;)
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins would be, but no. The digit separator is placed wrong :)
  • 0
    @irene reverse pi day!
  • 2
    @irene why you bully, we need more IT holidays
  • 3
    @irene but, everything is dumb :/
  • 1
    @irene those are so we get days off of work
  • 1
    It s half τ tho
  • 1
    @irene fine .. you win! I will party by taking a nap
  • 6
    Um... How the fuck do you format dates
  • 2
    If you mean to celebrate raspberry pi 3 model B+ release?
    Then yes!
  • 6
    @sharktits

    As a programmer :
    2018-03-14

    As a country with a Queen one way or another:
    14/03/2018

    As a confused American:
    03/14/2018

    Only the confused celebrate Pi Day
  • 0
    So you don't do may the 4th be woth you either?
  • 3
  • 1
    @MPKaboose
    Except, we will never know the last digits of pi, because it has infinitely many decimal places.
  • 2
    @C0D4 perfect breakdown, thanks.
  • 1
    @C0D4 we have no queen in israel 🙁
  • 1
    @hubiruchi well... 💩 any country not US then 😂
  • 1
    @C0D4 technically, what you posted would be correct for an American, making them NOT confused
  • 1
    @irene there’s always someone that has to break conventions 🤷‍♂️
  • 2
    @rasm945i DD-MM-YYYY is not the EU way. Some countries like Hungary do use the logical YYYY-MM-DD format.
  • 1
    @namenlossss oh, i wasnt aware of that :o
  • 2
    @irene Mostly, yes. Still I'd argue that giving information from large to small is better than the other way around. This is especially true for addresses. Look at the german address system: Street; Number; Zip code; City; Country. Why?? The first information is useless until you have gotten the last. It's if URLs were like this:
    some/subdomain/com.example//:https

    This is true for languages as well, where certain languages *cough* German *cough* force you to use inefficient syntax(German Perfekt constructions), which is why I prefer languages like english or hungarian, which allow you to order everything like it's best and where you only have to give necessary information in a sentence(unlike German)

    All in all the german sucks.
  • 1
    @irene No, I love that, it's the same in hungarian. A good speaker can use this to efficiently, quickly and easily get their point across.
  • 1
    @irene No, of course. But English is still far more free and loose compared to German.
  • 2
    @irene hahahahahahaha no.
    Between the plurals, inconsistent pronounciation, unclear negativity placing, contractions and possessives, it is a mess.

    Just look at @namenlossss 's first sentence: "No, of course". Is he agreeing or disagreeing with you? It's obvious to us, but universal rules are universally broken in English.
  • 1
    @namenlossss
    I disagree with you in every point. The German systems all have their logic.

    Date: In systems yyyy-mm-dd is the most practical, but in the daily live you normally know the year and the month, so calling them before the day everytime is redundant. Mostly we only say the day in German: "Which date is today?" "It's the 20th."

    Address: Same here: The digital scanning machine doesn't care for the order, but the postman does. His post is presorted for the route, so he only cares for name, street and number. The format is efficient for his work.

    German grammar: It is far more logical than every other natural language I know. And if you are at least in an intermediate level of speaking (for beginners it is hard), you can tell with all the rules exactly and very efficiently what you mean. German isn't optimised for telling short things quickly, it is optimised to tell large things easily and efficiently.
  • 1
    @Benedikt Schachtelsätze + Schwaben kennen kein Präteritum.
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