2
Omnisus
3y

So a few months ago a broke screen of my laptop, currently I quite broke so I can't change screen and for some time I was using TV as screen, but ofc. Windows have to crash or do similar shit and know it doesn't send signal via HDMI, probably it's showing some info, but signal is only send when it boots windows or something.

So my girlfriend give me her old laptop (4gb RAM and I3 processor, bit touchscreen :/) and windows aren't updated for quite a long (it was still windows 8) and I tried to update it. Ofc it has to be problem, DISM doesn't work, downloading iso doesn't work, fml. I guessed I have to live with that, but later disc usage starts to be around 100% and freeze for few minutes (shitty Win2k PC at uni was more responding). Then I try to refresh windows, DISM starts working, updates semi-working. I left with 21 updates with error and there starts conversation:
Me: install 21 updates
Win: kk. Or actually no
Me: please
Win: the best what I could do is 8.
Me: it's something
Win: actually fuck it, only 4
Me: I'm done *typing Manjaro xfce*

So now I have dual boot with Manjaro which use 40% ram with Firefox open, when windows has 30% alone. I can't play anyway and DF is on Linux so fuck Windows.

I am noob when it comes to Linux and everything actually, but it makes me want to learn and improve.

Comments
  • 2
    Use Linux Mint instead, I dont get it why people use Manjaro when they actually dont contribute to it
  • 0
    @Linux I chose Manjaro due opinions that it's lightweight distribution and not as hard as Arch. Maybe bad decision and mint with xcfe will be better option. Could you say briefly why mint? Also lightweight distro with less chance to broke something or what?

    Thanks for advice (I will learn more if I find some time for it...)

    Edit. I am happy that I don't have to deal with windows for some time (at least)
  • 1
    @Omnisus
    Well, it is not really lightweight if you install something. Every package that you install is delivered with every single component even if it is not needed. It just takes up space.

    Also, Arch based distro will break. They are made for testing only and you should not rely on it as your daily driver unless you want to spend alot of time.

    That is why I recommend not using it
  • 0
    @Linux oh, ok thanks very much for your time and explanation. So I will make switch soon.
  • 1
    @Linux Manjaro doesn't directly use arch repos. It has its own repos so after packages are pushed to arch repos they don't appear in manjaro instantly. It take some time for them to appear in Manjaro. They are tested first and patched for Manjaro if needed and then they appear on stable manjaro branch. So even if it is rolling release and based on arch it has very low possibility of breaking stuff. I for myself is using Manjaro from past 2 years and I have never encountered a breakage because of updates.
  • 0
    @darkLord

    Well, how do you explain that the manjaro repo only take 70GB?

    They use the Arch repo no doubt.
  • 1
    @Linux Mint is good and I also recommend to those instead of Ubuntu who wants to use apt based package management but you saying Arch and Arch based distros are completely for testing is ridiculous. First of all you're meant to spend time when you choose arch because that's what you opted for. That's the whole idea behind Arch that your linux your way. It's your responsibility to take care of it.
    Second Manjaro is a daily driver candidate. If it couldn't be used as daily driver then it wouldn't be on distrowatcher's top spot from like months.
    So my point is you should not mislead people. You can say your opinion but you don't need to say bad stuff about things you don't know about (or tend to ignore).
    Peace ✌️
  • 0
  • 1
    @darkLord

    Well, I just quoted what the devs of Archs Linux says themself - it is for testing new stuff.

    You should read up about what Arch Linux is really meant for yourself ;)
  • 0
    @Linux do you know what is the size of Arch repos? It is around 50-60 gbs. Repo sizes are low because of how arch package management is designed
  • 0
    @darkLord

    That link does not really explain anything regarding the mirrors.
  • 0
    @darkLord

    You're right, it is only 96GiB.

    When I checked a couple of years back it was closely to 200GB
  • 1
    @Linux according to Arch wiki it was around 60 gig in march but it might have be grown by now. And if you really want to make sure if Manjaro uses it's own mirrors or not just browse manjaro ftp mirror and arch mirror and you will find that not all the packages are at same version as they are in arch repo.
  • 2
    @darkLord

    Thanks for making that clear!

    @Omnisus

    Please read what darkie said in previous posts
  • 1
    @Linux @darkLord Thank you guys for clarifying, I will dive deeper in the topic of Linux distros (mainly mint/Manjaro) after I finish work at Uni.

    Joining devrant was great idea, community is awesome. Have a nice day
  • 1
    @Omnisus
    Sleep well m8
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