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Installing Ubuntu right now...
Any tips/tricks that I should know?

Comments
  • 11
    *tries to hold back a 'rm -rf /' joke*
  • 5
    Installing Ubuntu is as easy as filling out the required forms (mostly user account info) and pressing next; seriously, you'll be fine. It's probably the distro with the easiest install process.

    Edit: might be an oversimplification, dual booting may require a bit of special partition work; however, there are plenty of resources for that online, and the installer can even detect most other OSes now and automatically set up dual boot if you ask it to IIRC
  • 5
    @theKarlisK :’) I’m not foolish. I know my basics
  • 1
    @tokumei Partitioning is made very, very easy by macOS. That’s easy then
  • 1
    Well, it depends on what do you want to know, what do you want to do with it and your specs. I.e. I recommend not using gnome as desktop environment because I find it incredibly resourceful and quite useless, and like to work with dwm even if it’s not the most nice to getting started to :)
  • 1
    @2lazy2debug Alright. I’ll look into that. Thanks!
  • 0
    @DuckDuckWent you might want to spend some Minutes on the net to find an environment that suits you rather than just following what I did :)
  • 0
    @2lazy2debug I’m just messing around with it for a bit, so I might just try a couple of different ones out
  • 4
    Ubuntu is pretty straightforward. Just avoid using PPAs as package sources. Also: always sudo apt update before you sudo apt upgrade
  • 1
    @RantSomeWhere Nothing's inherently wrong with using PPAs, the user just has to be aware that they're not officially maintained, may break, may contain malware, similar to AUR for the Arch ecosystem. However, I won't ever discredit it for these flaws; user-maintained packages do have advantages (like lowering the barrier for packaging, letting anyone ship third-party packages, potentially gaining enough reputation to be an official maintainer). They are a very important thing.
  • 0
    @DuckDuckWent If you want something glaringly different, enlightenment is very amazing. It's light, fast, and probably the most bling Linux has to offer outside of Compiz (which is probably for later experimentation). If you want a distro which shows enlightenment off nicely, Bodhi is an Ubuntu-based system that tries to be as pure enlightenment as possible. I go back to it every now and then to bask in the prettyness (and then go back to Manjaro KDE when I want to have a more "tame" businesslike system.)
  • 1
  • 0
    @powerfulparadox I’ll look into it :)
  • 5
    From my experience, the only advice I could give you is to install another distro... But to each their own, and I couldn't defend my point of view much because of how little I've actually used it
  • 7
    I personally tend to dislike Ubuntu because of its milestone release paradigm and very much delayed release schedule. Stable goes only so far.. and testing doesn't require multiple years. Also their dependency solving system in apt is extremely flawed, often pulling in way more than it should. Personally I prefer Arch and its children (e.g. Antergos & Manjaro) over Debian and its children (e.g. Ubuntu and Mint). Its headless edition is a neat system for servers though.

    As for what you should keep in mind when installing Linux: most of your questions will be answered by stuff that will be executed in the terminal aka the command line aka the console. The thing with the blinking cursor that waits for your commands. This is because there's so many desktop environments out there and even the command line can vary from distro to distro, especially when it regards package management. You'll want to get familiar with the shell. Linux is to this day still quite command-line oriented. Why? Because implementing every command line switch in a GUI is a pain in the ass.
  • 1
    @Condor As I mentioned earlier, it is just a bit of messing around with it. I’ll stay on macOS for compatibility reasons, but I want to explore Linux anyways. At some point where I have more time I will look into Arch - just not yet. Also, given that macOS is Unix-based, I do have some experience with the CLI
  • 8
    @DuckDuckWent oh I'm not suggesting Arch at all, seriously it's amazing but the barrier to entry is quite high. For me it took nearly 2 years of dicking around with other distros like Ubuntu and Manjaro before I was able to take the plunge. Never looked back ever since, but again pretty advanced stuff. MacOS is a reasonably good system, and I honestly don't know its compatibility with Linux.. if you're already having an Apple laptop, I'd honestly stick with MacOS.. I mean, being Unix-based it's got a terminal and all. Should be good enough for the shells that I go out with :)
  • 1
    @Condor Yeah, it’s just that I’m curious about it :) Though I’m having a slight bit of trouble installing it, see my latest rant...
  • 2
    @Condor it was the same for me to go from zero to arch.
  • 1
    I might be a bit late, but make a separate partition for your home folder. Will save you in case of reinstalles and various fuck ups.
  • 0
    @MrJimmy Nope. Not late. Ran into some driver issues that kept me from making any installation progress. But thanks, if I ever resolve these issues
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