9
TheOct0
6d

Just a little poll for you guys :)

Do you comment your code during the development or when it's done?

Do you keep track of the documentation during the development or after?

Do you use Git only for source control or also to work from multiple places and keep the code up to date?

Do you sh*tcode on purpose (or don't make any effort to clean it) when it's not for yourself, or not for something you value much?

If you have any other strange habit, feel free to mention it :)

Comments
  • 0
    My answers:
    I comment and make the docs at the very end out of laziness, I use Git for both purposes and I purposely don't put any effort into my code sometimes when it's a chore more than a joy
  • 6
    My answers:

    1. It depends, for 3 reasons: I'm that douchebag who never comments his code because I believe my code is easily readable (I mean, it's PHP, come on). However, if a part is tricky, I'll comment it while developing. But, if it needs to be commented, I'll do it when it's done.

    2. Documentation? What documentation? Will annotations be enough? :')

    3. Actually both: I sometimes need to remember how was a file before I change it, and I have 2 computers (one laptop, one desktop, and I like to work from them both

    4. I tend to shitcode while developing until what I want to do works. Then I refactor the shit out of it

    5. My way of coding depends entirely of the kind of music I'm listening. But it'll (most of the time) work.
  • 0
    @Drillan767 Well all of those are interesting :)
    Would you refactor something you really don't give a damn about?
  • 0
    @TheOct0 If I did write the code, then I care about it and will sooner or later refactor it. If not, well I might notify the responsible about his shitcode if I'm in a good mood :')
  • 0
    @Drillan767 Im exactly like this guy
  • 1
    @Drillan767 Well I'm a lot less professional in that if I don't give a damn about the project I'll just give the bare minimum of the working version to the guy, except if I'm paid for it. Or if its a friend. Or if I like the project. Or if it's for me. I'm realizing I'm the most selfish bastard '-'
  • 0
    @TheOct0 Don't worry, we all are in some ways :')
  • 0
    @Drillan767 It's not like I would have changed anyways :P
  • 4
    I don't really write code that's supposed to be used by others (other than my dotfiles which I take care of because 5 stars).. I'll focus on my dotfiles for now.

    My main development machine is (used to be) my laptop. Recently that turd crashed on an update so I'm recreating it on my virtualization server, giving in on RAM (not like I really need 8GB anyway) and doubling its cores - the server's rhost will have the ability to use all 4 cores instead of the laptop's 2.

    Back when I used my laptop for development, I would SSH into it, tweak the code and commit to the develop branch. Signed commits, if I may add. Those are committed to GitHub, though I've recently switched to GitLab instead.. but it doesn't support my GPG subkey signatures. Boo -.-

    Now, the rhost that's in the making would replace that laptop.. the rough setup has been completed there - LUKS, btrfs, Arch Linux, Mate desktop, Terminology. Theming is still a very important bit that's so far been unsatisfied though, as well as a VNC server. When that's done, rhost will become my main development station.

    When development has been made, I usually task my other hosts to git pull whenever I get to use them again, but admittedly I often forget about it. Automation is key here. So yeah, I use git not only for source control but also to ease deployment on other hosts.

    Shitcode on purpose.. well I'm using it myself, so writing shit would be really backwards considering that I'd also be affected by it.. perhaps unknowingly.

    Strange habits.. well coding is pretty normal I presume? At least in these circles. I tend to enjoy watching anime though.
  • 1
    1. I comment the code while I'm coding and my thoughts are fresh.

    2. Usually, I document before I code so that I know what I am supposed to achieve and can tell when I'm done.

    3. I don't use Git, but SVN, and then for version control.

    4. I shitcode if it's either for just trying out ideas or for a throw-away-tool.
  • 1
    I'm in the camp that believes there is no such thing as too much documentation, so I do my best to record my logic as I go along. About once a day or every other day I'll double-check to see if there are any areas I missed (function documentation, explanation of the logic behind loops, etc.).

    I may spend about a third of my time writing comments, but the tradeoff is it's very easy for me to get back into something I've put down for a while because the logic is all there, and cross-referenced at that.
  • 0
  • 1
    I add indented comments for the logic of any code I write, before I start coding. This way I can check the logic of that code before I actually implement it. Most of the time I find and fix possible bugs at this stage, and at the same time I already have all my future code commented and documented. A lot of times I just need to copy the comments into an .md file, pretty it up a bit and the docs are also already done.

    As for git, I push all my commits at least at the end of each day, as a form of backup. I also use it to collaborate. As my code is always available online, it really makes life easier!

    I never shitcode on purpose. I try to make every project I work on as best as I can, not just for the client. As I train myself to follow best practices, conventions and style guides, I push myself to be better at what I do.

    I love coding, and I wanna get better at it...

    I recommend it to all. This is our passion! We need to nurture it and care for it, or else why do it at all?
  • 0
    @balaianu Well your reply was amazing. That's some good habits material right there :)
  • 1
    @TheOct0 Thank you! Hope it helps :)
  • 1
    "Do you comment your code during the development or when it's done?"

    I comment code only when I leave some TODOs around for next day. For the rest, unit tests are all the comments I need.

    "Do you keep track of the documentation during the development or after?"

    During. On the long run, it's time-saving and at least I can spread boring tasks like this across all development time.

    "Do you use Git only for source control or also to work from multiple places and keep the code up to date?"

    Are these options contractdicting each other? It doesn't seem so to me. I use git as source control AND to work from multiple place AND to keep the code up to date.

    "Do you sh*tcode on purpose (or don't make any effort to clean it) when it's not for yourself, or not for something you value much?"

    It can happen I wrote shitcode, but never on purpose (especially years ago as a jr, it's normal). Now, if I see it, I try to clean and refactor.
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