3
LombArd
4y

A new colleague of mine says he reads not the changes, but each commit, and will not approve if one commit wasn't good. Have you ever heard that before?

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  • 1
  • 1
    well that's just silly :)
  • 3
    @netikras he was hired as a senior and seems to have a bit of an elitist attitude
  • 1
    Its a bit harsh but on the other hand, if you need to look at the history its the commit messages you see.

    Both should be clear and relevant.

    I more than once have found commit messages like “stuff” “to much to write” and such.

    Those days I actually would side with your colleague ;)

    But I guess he has a standard quite a bit above that. And from your rant, probably to high.
  • 0
    @Voxera I was under impression OP meant commit contents, not the message. If it's message we're talking about then I agree with the reviewer. But if we're talking about commit contents then I'm with OP.
  • 1
    @Voxera sums it up nicely once again
  • 0
    You guys don't just squash before merging? Only reason I see to keep an ancestor commit is if it contained some previously agreed upon design that you want to keep in the upstream for documentation purpose.
  • 1
    @netikras no, I totally agree with meaningless messages, they need to describe changes.

    I am talking about the content of a commit. Say I made a commit removing something, then another adding the line again as I made a mistake, he would not approve it
  • 0
    @beegC0de that's the thing, we squash as part of our merge
  • 0
    @LombArd so... He's only reading one commit?
  • 0
    @beegC0de no it's not squashed prior to that, at the merge request it's comprised of multiple commits but squashed after approval and merging takes place (GitLab option)
  • 0
    @LombArd so just squash before pushing to your remote branch my man
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