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I made a ridicously hilarious hack recently. My refrigerator it's broken, it has a huge leak of water, my hack was to let the water flow in a plastic box and make a circuit with two water level sensors, a relay and a PIC16F628A to activate a pump that sucks water away through a tube that I wedged intlside the gasket of the washbasin. This gave me the time to buy a newer and better one.

Comments
  • 15
    ++ for the hardware hack :)
  • 5
    Holy shit

    3complex5me
  • 4
    As a former refrigerator techitan a heater that is broken there. And i would do what you did anyway as thats how the big sytems work :)
  • 1
    @kb88 hahaha thanks :3
  • 1
    @eidar glad ti hear that, i have only make it still works for a month :]
  • 1
    Well then as this is most likely just a heater element in the water tank in the back replacing that could give you some years still out of it
  • 0
    @FitzAuernheimer It is't so complex, it's only low level programming, you can do the same in a simplier way with an arduino :)
  • 0
    Hey hey are we going for 175? Hahaha I didn't think this could be so interesting.
  • 0
    @localghost Nice ! Pic16 though, that sucks :'(((
  • 0
    Kudos to hardware hack. May our tribe increase here.
  • 0
    @localghost sry, if I sound picky but maybe you should change"uniti" to "unity" in your profile
  • 0
    @vringar hahaha thanks the fleksy keyboard changed the word with an italian word :)
  • 0
    @Artemix if you want you can use the datasheet to read how it works and the instruction set, if you want to use assembly. You can also use C with mikroC, C18 or others. MikroC has a good documentation and example. The hard part it's the setup for the pic, you need to read the datasheet and learn how to setup the register to set the oscillator (internal, external, with or without the multiplier), you have to set the tris registers before you use the port registers and setup the adc pins, the pwm pins and more stuff. Online you can find a lot of tutorials to start but all are written on the most common pics, start with the 16f84 (or 16f628A very similar and it has an internal oscillator) or the 18f2550 and his big brother 18f4550 (they have usb and you can upload an usb bootloader) they are well documented. After more particular is the 16f877A, it has capacitive inputs. If you are a student or for work you can get 2 free sample at month from the microchip sample website :)
  • 0
    @localghost Np offence meant, but I still can't understand why the pic16 is so popular. I think it has mostly to do with their effective marketing strategy (sending free samples to hobbyists and universities). The architecture is so inferior to anything else I've seen! Atmel, AVR, msp430 are so much more... sense-making. I mean a call-stack with only 7 slots, come ON!! (6 if you want to run the debugger). And their IDE??? I remember the amount of frustration going through the combinations of ICD2 and ICD3 and versions of MPLAB, and contradictory specs on whether to have a cap on the jtag or not >>>:(((
    (this is devrant, right?)
  • 0
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