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I hate Docker. I hate networking with Docker. I hate Hyper-V.

I've spent over a month dealing with problem after problem after problem.

Someone put me out of my misery.

Comments
  • 3
    lazydocker? https://github.com/jesseduffield/...
    lazydocker/README.md at master · jesseduffield/lazydocker ...
  • 1
    @Mitiko that looks amazing and would definitely help me a ton, but I'm on Windows Server 2016 because work and that seems to only be available to Linux and Mac
  • 1
    @meowijuanas There's always "put it all in a container and roll" approach? A simulation inside a simulation of sorts

    That's a bit on the fun side...
    Here's my 2 cents:
    People, humans are made to adapt. We couldn't have survived without this ability. You don't have a thousand options - you either take a rest and try to grasp the underlying concepts, or you say "fuck it" and search for a workaround (usually quite easy but not performant.

    When _I_ get stuck in a loophole of stuff I don't quite get, I drop everything and try to build something simple that has the same problem in essence. What you get is the solution. Then you apply and hope for the best!
  • 0
    If you're just trying to get an overview of what's going on inside your docker, I'd recommend Portainer, it's basically a web UI for Docker and you can do almost everything through it. It also gives you an API for automation.

    Though your rant sounds a lot like you're trying to simply mirror your current server over to Docker and you're getting frustrated because things don't work the same way...
  • 0
    Dude, I had to deal with some docker stuff today as well but that was the least of my problems, fuck
  • 1
    @Mitiko @hitko

    Allow me to embarrass myself:

    I am using Docker EE on Windows Server 2016 VMware instance. I am simply trying to deploy a static web page and connect to it from a separate, physical machine on the same domain network.

    I have run into a million problems, and each time I fix one, another pops up. I did get this to work on Docker for Windows on my Windows 10 work laptop (first attempt even), but I cannot replicate anything successful with Docker EE on WS2016.

    Right now, I cannot seem to get IPs assigned to container instances. Ive tried statically assigning and using DHCP.

    The ultimate end goal is to completely containerize one of our applications for all stages of development.
    The company has never used docker before and is leaving me in charge of figuring this out.

    I have read so much documentation and even community-created guides and tutorials, but for some reason Docker will not function as expected.

    I have no clue how I'm going to take on an entire legacy application, when I can't even seem to resolve this.

    I know I will find a solution, and it will probably be something ridiculously easy or obvious, but for now I remain frustrated.
  • 1
    @meowijuanas I'm sorry to hear you have to deal with this all on your own, but we all believe in your abilities! You should too!

    Just try to fix every problem calmly, one by one as if it were a game. I can't give you any more specific advice, other than to try to encourage you not to give up!
  • 1
    @Mitiko i appreciate it very much! Thanks for being supportive
  • 0
    A few things:

    1. You don't hate Docker, you hate Docker on Windows.

    2. Why can't you run it on Linux? Is it a Windows application? If yes, why not use the native Windows containers (yes that's a thing)? And if you need to use docker isn't there the Docker USP?

    3. Let me guess that you having a huge amount of volume issues. if you haven't yet, your in for a nervous breakdown, docker volume issues (especially with Windows) are soen it's biggest problems.

    4. Kubernetes? (Idk what the deal with that on Windows is though)

    5. What @Mitiko said. And if dealing with a specific issue gets boring, write down where you got till (so you don't forget, and so when your in a different state of mind you can figure out what might work better), and work on something else.

    6. You'll figure it out eventually, and once you do, you'll feel like a genius, a million bucks, and you'll be able to put on your resume that your an expert in Docker for Windows migrations.
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