24
VaderNT
1y

The exit interview with an ex boss.

While working there, we had regular meetings every other week. Discussing current work, equipment requests, technology, sometimes office politics. At some point we discussed that our team was moved to an open-plan office and how I regarded this as detrimental to our productivity and satisfaction. Of course we sometimes had different opinions, but it was an amicable atmosphere. My boss also always carried a personal organizer and sometimes wrote notes during these meetings.

Later I resigned. Him becoming more and more abusive was a major reason, and I think he knew he had crossed a line. So the day of the exit interview came...

In a professional setting, you'd thank each other for the good collaboration. Maybe laugh about one or two points from the past. And then wish each other success for the future and say farewell.

Not there. Not with him in the exit interview.

Instead, he apparently went through a list in his personal organizer. A list of every single thing we ever disagreed at. And roasted me for each. single. item. "Back when you said x... you can't really say it like that". Or "remember that time when you were against open-plan offices? Let me tell you, that's just your opinion. There are no actual arguments against them, it's just a matter of taste". And that went on and on and on. Like a final reckoning. Like he needed to get revenge. I hope that carnage made him happy, because it made *me* happy to have had resigned.

And it was fucking unprofessinal, because this is the management equivalent of stomping your foot in rage and anger, shouting "no no nooo I'm right! I! am! Riiiiiiight! *stomp*".

Comments
  • 8
    I would have stood up, collected my things, and walked out.
  • 4
    I mean, even universities did research about open plan offices, nothing to them make you more productive, in some cases it was even the other way around...

    So the final conclusion is that open-plans are cheaper.
  • 2
    @Root exactly! The exit interview is a courtesy to your employer to give him insight where they could improve or if something went wrong without you having anything to loose. If they don't appriate that, just say good bye and walk out. It's not like they are going to fire you.
  • 2
    You can post a review on Glassdor where you share your observations regarding those points ;)
  • 1
    @Root Agree. I wasn't in the mental condition to do that at the time, though. After all his abuse, and all his veiled and open threats I was just fucking afraid of that man. (which he knew. In one meeting I took all my courage to tell him "I am afraid of you". To which he simply replied "Oh, that wasn't my intention". No "sorry", no "what can I do to fix that?" - just "that wasn't my intention". He probably added in his head "... but boy does that come in handy")

    Nowadays I just despise him... should I ever become a manager he basically serves as my anti-role model. I strive to never become like him in any way.
    This hate isn't healthy either, but it's a step up from being paralysed by fear.
  • 1
    Thanks for this unnessesary long list of things we disagreed. [Look onto watch/wallclock/phone] Oh I see my time is up. [Stand up and leave building] Have a Nice day.
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