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So apparently a gooey has to be developed.

Comments
  • 5
    A long standing battle
    Is it gooey or is it geeyouaye?
  • 6
    You mean a gee you eye?
  • 10
    Goo-eee
  • 5
    @C0D4 blasphemous response mate lmao
  • 7
    @Stuxnet gew wii?
  • 4
    @C0D4 gee you eye >>>>
  • 8
    @Stuxnet no it's goo wii, not 3 syllables, 2.
  • 6
  • 4
    @RememberMe woah Satan calm down over there
  • 2
    At this point I just say user interface.
  • 3
    @AlgoRythm I prefer GUI.
  • 1
    @Lor-inc teletypes haven't been a thing for thousands of years. Even "terminal emulators" are graphical these days. There's no reason for the G.

    It's either UI or user interface in my book 😎
  • 1
    @AlgoRythm TUIs aren't called that because there's no graphics involved, but because the program can't communicate in anything but text. So even though a terminal emulator uses a GUI, it still exposes a TUI to the running program.
  • 1
    @Lor-inc meh. Emulators support color, background images, transparent backgrounds, fonts and font styles (bold, italic, underlined) and many support utf and emojis so... agree to disagree.
  • 1
    @AlgoRythm I think unicode could still pass, the background isn't controlled by the running application so it isn't part of the interface and some colors/styles are still okay. The key difference is when you get mouse support, image display or arbitrary colors. At least to me. In a stricter sense box drawing isn't text and therefore curses is already a GUI, even if it can work inside a terminal.
  • 1
    @Lor-inc so what you're saying is you think that the only true TUI is a teletype

    I agree. And those don't exist anymore (even though console sessions live in a tty device).

    stdin/ stdout are used by the program and therefore aren't user interfaces. They're just file streams.

    Everything is graphical these days. Even in Linux.
  • 1
    @AlgoRythm I think that a text user interface conceptually shouldn't rely on geometry. In this sense, curses (which works on a teletype) isn't TUI, but the console Git client and most GNU coreutils are, no matter where they run.
  • 1
    @Lor-inc curses doesn't use geometry it uses escape codes. It doesn't enter a geometric mode, it opens a new buffer. That's it
  • 1
    So by my understanding of the word, Alexa has a TUI because intonation has no meaning apart from the occasional question mark, so it essentially transmits and receives text.
  • 1
    @AlgoRythm It exploits the fact that the terminal is a grid of monospace characters. A "text" UI works on much more than a terminal.
  • 1
    @AlgoRythm Don't define concepts with implementations.
  • 2
    @Lor-inc It's one of those things that's stupid to define. And make no mistake, I'm not arguing with you. Just discussing. But if I had to draw a line in the Sand about what a text user interface is, it has to be text and text alone. I'm thinking monochrome with no background images, bold, italic, etc. If it isn't on the ASCII chart, it's not text.

    But of course today those standards have changed. It seems that anything which is *predominantly* text is a tui. Modern emulators being an example. But it's a slippery slope. Most people say that terminal emulators with transparent backgrounds, tabs, menus, and colors aren't graphical... But word processors are.

    This is what we call semantics and it's bullshit. Just like classifying animals based on physical characteristics. Somehow a platypus is an egg-laying mammal, a tomato is a fruit, vegetable, and berry all at once, and any featherless biped is a man (behold!)

    But anyways. I'll just conclude by repeating: if we NEED to draw a line in the Sand, see my definition above.
  • 1
    @AlgoRythm Well, I'm just trying to make a definition that doesn't rely on the technology behind all of it. Generally people consider everything a TUI that works on a terminal. The problem with this definition is that there's no reference terminal to use. Gnome terminal literally allows images in the terminal, while a VT100 has only ASCII and a bell. And in that sense, japanese software never was TUI, since it never used only ASCII.
  • 1
    @AlgoRythm I'd also like to add that the interface by definition only consists of means of communication, i.e. only stuff that both of them can read or write, so the terminal emulator's utilities like tabs, backgrounds and menus definitely don't influence the program being TUI or not.
  • 2
    @Lor-inc destroying the definition for TUI is not the most pressing reason to hate the Japanese written language and it's challenges for converting it into digital form.

    xterm is basically the standard. Most emulators are forks of it and almost all of them use it's 256 color mode, they just add more things on top.

    Don't forget that electron based emulator. I forget what it was called but the demo literally had particles burst out of the cursor every time you tyed a letter. Is that TUI? Maybe. It's more of an insult to TUI in my opinion.
  • 2
    @AlgoRythm No matter how much glitter you put on either side, the interface doesn't include those. A wire will always be a scalar analog time-continuous interface, even if you use it to watch youtube.

    I want to see that emulator though.
  • 2
    @Lor-inc Ah fuck, no you don't. Electron and terminal emulators are opposites. It's the second worse thing to ever happen to the universe besides the creation of the universe itself (which, I don't know if you heard, was widely regarded as a bad move)

    I'll see if I can find it, you masochist.
  • 1
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