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JS96
36d

I consider this day very productive.
So proud of myself. 😁

Comments
  • 1
    oh yeah, I can spend the whole day putting effort in single README
  • 2
    Man I would die if I had to work with someone who wrote terrible commit messages and didn’t squash their commits
  • 2
    if that makes Readme 100% more readable? worth it
  • 2
    @FrodoSwaggins just out of curiosity, what makes updated readme.md such a horrible messag? descriptive and simple, what more do you want?
  • 0
    @AleCx04 that’s not a helpful commit message; it’s abysmal.

    What is the abstract of what you changed in readme? What was wrong before? What have you added? No I don’t need the copy and paste of the change in the commit message but you should explain why the change is needed and or an abstract of what was changed or added.

    If it’s something as dumb as a typo, say “fixed a typo.” If it’s adding six paragraphs, what prompted you to add them and what are they describing?

    If you write 8 commit messages that say “update readme” in one day (which is BARELY if at all better than just saying “update” it makes me wonder what the damn difference is between these, and why aren’t they squashed? How could you have fucked up so many times that you needed to fix it 7 times? And each of those times not bothered to tell me what the hell you are doing in a commit message?
  • 0
    @AleCx04 “changed my_file.cpp”
  • 0
    @AleCx04 updated a file
  • 0
  • 0
  • 1
  • 0
    @AleCx04 pushed a git commit
  • 2
    @FrodoSwaggins lol I don't see him doing that to actual code files, just to a simple README.md file, can't possibly assume that it would be the same for every other file. Give @JS96 some credit
  • 0
    @AleCx04 meh. Credit for updating the readme. No credit for commit messages and squash duty
  • 1
    @AleCx04 True.
    I do that only with the README, and only if I change it directly using web version of GitHub, I'm too lazy to explain I fixed a typo and where.

    @FrodoSwaggins
    On shared repos I always include a list (in the description section of the commit) of the changes I made to make it clear, not only for my coworkers but also for myself to find that commit in future.

    So maybe sometimes you can find a commit with title "Updated ClassName.cs", but in the description section you will always find (maybe not always, but 99.99% of the times) what I've really updated.
  • 1
    Prefered commit message of all times : WIP
  • 1
    @FrodoSwaggins changes Changes fixes Fixes fixed bug refactor
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