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Elixir vs PHP

which one will you pick for Backend(server -side)

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    rust

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    Neither, I need more performance than either can offer to be competitive.
  • 2
    Elixir because I love Erlang, but it's not the best for every use case.
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    Elixir. I really want to see how ddd looks like in a functional programming language.
  • 0
    How to compare those two?
  • 0
    @24th-Dragon
    Types and functional composition.
  • 1
    Rails. 🤷🏻‍♀️
  • 2
    Elixir if you know how to sell your skills. You'll make good money and do interesting projects.

    PHP if you want a job quickly. But you'll have to deal with wordpress plugins or code that has been written 15 years ago by the companies bosses then teenage cousin.
  • 1
    Laravel anyone? 😅
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    @SortOfTested elixir can be performant and if its not enough then you can very easily use native c(don't remember name of thing) or rust(rustler) to compensate. (edit misread)
  • 0
    Definitely elixir if not for the ease of making things conccurent and fault tolerant
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    @matt-jd
    We're doing 1.7M r/s to our APIs on 4 cores and 16gb of ram. Elixir won't do that. Actix is the only mainstream framework that will come close.
  • 0
    @SortOfTested that's a lot of request for that size of a machine 👀
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    @matt-jd
    Dotnet core and protobuf is an impressive combination, even with the stock aspnet middleware. We're not even running that all the time, that's our max scale. We're ECS with dynamic scale of 500Micro CPUs.

    There's a game company doing similar loads with memory optimizations and custom endpoint resolution at 7M+

    https://ageofascent.com/2019/02/...
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    @SortOfTested damn I'm impressed by the asp core and dot net core performance, makes me happy to know c#
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    @SortOfTested That is extremely impressive 😯
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    @Root
    All glory to the framework and language teams.

    Only thing I can really take credit for is we did testing and noticed our nginx RPs were bottlenecking, so I ended up writing our own in dotnetcore to increase our throughput. One of the really cool features is the ability to trivially hook input streams to output streams over async I/O via continuations. Enables high thread reuse, and low memory pressure since the proxy stream buffer is just natively memcpy'd onto the output stream.
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    @SortOfTested Sounds good.

    Out of curiosity: Do the requests have the same run time (each request takes approximately the same time)?
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    @IntrusionCM
    Highly variable, what matters is the time the request remains active in a thread context. That number is much closer per request than the total request time, which is primarily dependent on the persistence mechanism it talks to. Roughly 30% are store and forward messaging. There is a linear relationship to the amount of data sent and serialization, deserialization time. Protobuff enables to conform that data faster and send smaller payloads, so we reduce the risk of thread starvation issues.
  • 0
    Why would you say backend when you can’t use them for shit in Frontend, duh

    Still wouldn’t use either.
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    @SortOfTested :)

    Interesting. Since that is usually the number one headache.

    Either thread starvation or resource explosion.
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    @IntrusionCM
    Indeed. The rule I tell my guys is to minimize the amount of data sent per request to whatever is necessary (no jungles when a banana will do), dump the work to async I/O as fast as possible, then stream the response back directly. Buffering is the enemy.
  • 0
    @scout It's amazing how clean of an API they've managed to create. In terms of legibility and ease of maintenance I'd say it's one of the best frameworks out there. Not to say there aren't other great frameworks out there, I just sense there's a lot of framework rivalry between devs haha
  • 2
    Out of those two, elixir.

    Did a demo in it recently.

    But for real, nether.

    While elixir is powerful and, if you know what you do, very performant I found the documentation for beginners lacking.
    Lots of things was, “your supposed to know this already so we do not explain it here” which was very frustrating.

    Also, to few colleges know it so it would be a maintenance nightmare.

    But very interesting to learn.

    Needs better tutorials that does not expect a good knowledge of erlang and a number of frameworks.
  • 1
    @TjasPRG well I don’t know anything else of that domain so yeah I love it, no point of comparison lol
  • 0
    @scout You've chosen a great place to start then
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    PHP. Because i love it and don't know shit about Elixir!
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