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“The theory of quantum electrodynamics describes Nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense.” ~ Richard Feynman

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    @wiki theory of quantum electrodynamics
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    @wiki Richard Feynman
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    @ZeldaFan69-2 Richard Phillips Feynman ForMemRS (/ˈfaɪnmən/; May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) was an American theoretical physicist, known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as his work in particle physics for which he proposed the parton model. For contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965 jointly with Julian Schwinger and Shin'ichirō Tomonaga.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
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    @ZeldaFan69-2 In particle physics, quantum electrodynamics (QED) is the relativistic quantum field theory of electrodynamics. In essence, it describes how light and matter interact and is the first theory where full agreement between quantum mechanics and special relativity is achieved. QED mathematically describes all phenomena involving electrically charged particles interacting by means of exchange of photons and represents the quantum counterpart of classical electromagnetism giving a complete account of matter and light interaction.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
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    Quantum everything really is absolutely absurd from a classical perspective.

    Example: with it I can reliably measure something in a different room using particles that have never been there nor interacted with the object.

    I can take a photo of an apple by capturing light that has never touched it.

    I can detect if a light-sensitive bomb is live or a dud (without detonating it) by measuring light interference between a photon that never touched the bomb and a photon that did (and possibly detonated it) but never actually existed so that didn’t happen. Better yet: they’re the same particle. It did both, figured out which it liked better, and decided to have always done that instead — but ofc didn’t forget. Metagaming!

    The tl;dr:
    I can know all about events that never even happened.
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    And one step better: entangled particles can alter one another across time, even after one stops existing and before the next one starts. Quantum non-locality, baby!
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