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Built a Svelte app year ago and it's broken today.

This is not the case with Windows. You can still run a app built on 1999 today.

Opened an issue on their repo requesting that they should add backwards compatibility.

No later than 5 seconds. It got closed and locked with this comment,

"Welcome to development when you don't write your entire stack yourself by hand.

Please open helpful bug reports or don't open any at all."

This is what every FOSS project got as defense. They think since they work for free, they can do what the fuck they want.

The defense is false because they put their OSS project on their resume and in return they get hired for full time work or consulting.

I fucking sue you Svelte if I had money to hire expensive lawyers. This time you are just lucky.

Comments
  • 3
    How exactly did Svelte die on you?

    I could see it being a pain in the ass to work on some legacy stuff but I would expect it would ... work, as a site...unless you upgraded it or something.
  • 1
    @N00bPancakes

    Why do you call 1 year old app as legacy?
  • 0
    @bagfox I'm vegan and don't do drugs like you.
  • 0
    @bagfox

    It wastes time
    ----

    Let's face it: changelogs are a total waste of time. No one ever reads them. Ever. And the only reason you're writing them is to notify people of backwards incompatible changes. So now you've wasted the time of two groups of people:

    The library maintainer has to write a changelog that no one is going to read
    ----

    Users of a library have to spend time reading the changelog that they're never going to read anyway
    Instead, try this one simple trick: never break the API in any way. It takes literally no time to not break things. So save yourself and your users some time, and:

    Freedom is Slavery
    -----

    The freedom to break an API is a false freedom. In fact, you are now a slave. You're a slave to perfection. You will never be satisfied with your API. You'll always want to improve it. You'll want to make it safer, easier to use, or provide more efficient functions. If you go down this route, you'll never be free!
  • 1
    @bagfox

    More on,

    snoyman dot com /blog/2018/04/stop-breaking-compatibility/
  • 0
    @realJeffBezos I have backed my initial emotions with additional details.

    Also, what @N00bPancakes said. He was talking _for_ a legacy app. A one year svelte app shouldn’t qualify as legacy.

    It might also just be the case that you wrote yourself some incorrect code that would work on the current version, but is inherently wrong, but is only covered in a future version.
  • 1
    @realJeffBezos "PUBLISHED APRIL 1, 2018"
  • 0
    @realJeffBezos well actually.. I develop mostly with angular and I weekly catch up with changelogs, even if my project is still two major versions behind.

    You don’t know how often windows has gotten new APIs internally, but bridged them in order to fulfill backwards compatibility.
  • 6
    Lmao you seem like a fun person to talk to
  • 5
    @realJeffBezos Are you sure about the claim that no one read changelogs? Do you have any data that backs that up?

    I also wonder how did a Svelte based app break. I'm guessing you were doing stuff to supported outdated browsers (or outdated versions) and that backfired on you.

    And for what it's worth, if you really want the Svelte team to implement something then you should consider (financially) supporting them in whichever way you can. I don't know what their roadmap is tho.
  • 0
    @realJeffBezos

    I guess it really depends on what happened exactly.

    I wrote some old code... today in an older version....
  • 0
    @bagfox Incorrect code?

    Joking me?

    I used their npx templates
  • 0
    @N00bPancakes Well, they have broken their rollup plugin.
  • 0
    @Berkmann18 I created my app for Chrome.

    The issue is not with my code. The issue with their configs like rollup. A year old config doesn't work because they added new option called compileOptions.
  • 0
    @Berkmann18 I didn't read change logs on my life. I only know such a thing TODAY!
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop So what? Can't you publish content on that day? It's published for Fools who are trying to prefect every API.
  • 0
    @realJeffBezos And you didn’t add your own logic? Doubt that.

    Yes, things like.. browser specific code, or features from outdated versions. Or maybe even incorrectly handling Promises, who knows.

    Or maybe, just maybe, you got a prefab template from the early days that mentioned various things that are about to change, but you simply didn’t read them.
  • 0
    @bagfox

    I grabbed it on 2020/04 just like all other people do.

    It's a NPX template with ready made config.

    They broke that Config with this year update!!

    This is not related to Browsers.
  • 0
    @bagfox

    This,

    github/sveltejs/template

    It has changed now but it was diff by the time I used.

    I don't want to learn it every time it change. I want it to be stable. This is like living next to SUN, you never know when it hit you!
  • 4
    Either they're not following semantic versioning (doubtful) or you're not paying attention to it. If they actually broke compatibility in a minor/patch version I'm sure they'd be more willing to address it.
  • 3
    @realJeffBezos I read changelogs. :(
  • 4
    I'd say an open source project, especially when it presents itself as a production framework of library, has some moral obligation to use proper versioning as much as possible, and keep things as stable & secure as possible.

    It does however rarely have a legal obligation to do so — all open source licenses I know of clearly state that "SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED AS-IS"

    It is your responsibility to test whether a certain version works, and then freeze/lock it either by using version constraints in a package manager, or even just vendoring (copy paste include) into your project.

    Introducing breaking changes on a minor version is an incompetent oversight or a dick move (depending on whether it was intentional), and something I regularly get frustrated about.

    But legally, it's not something you can sue over — the license is pretty clear about that.

    It's also your own responsibility to research every framework/package before using it — Are there many open or unresolved closed issues? What is the maintenance cadence? If you quickly skim through the code, does it look well-written? Could you take over maintenance if the package is abandoned?
  • 1
    @realJeffBezos Read the whole article. If you aren't like WTF?? when reading the "Use prefixes and suffixes" section, you should re-consider your dev career choice.
  • 0
    @bittersweet You understand the US legal system is most complex in the world. There are always loopholes around it. You just need to find lawyers who charge $2000/per hour.
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop

    That's for languages that doesn't support function overloading.

    I'm in this industry since 2003's and mainly working on writing Kernel level Drivers.

    Svelte felt like C but that seduction is gold digger one.

    By profession, I'm not a front end developer.

    Svelte should become ISO accredited. and maintain quality control not dick moves.
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop

    By the way,

    The languages that supports function overloading actually use prefix when compiling. The prefix is made up from function signature.
  • 3
    @realJeffBezos That's called "name mangling".

    And if you didn't get the joke with the functions, you surely should have gotten the joke with the change log.

    I'm not sure what you write into your release notes, but what I expect there is not only breaking changes, but added features, improvements, and most importantly, fixed bugs.
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop Well, it's. I assumed you are a front end developer.

    I don't want breaking changes ever, ever...

    I want everything to be Windows alike.
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop

    Well, If I put other way. I'm fine with breaking changes too but the one year gap felt too much to me. It's fine if they do a breaking change in 10 years from now.
  • 0
    @realJeffBezos So that was a _breaking_ change and you've got on with it thinking it won't break anything?

    Fair enough, at least you know changelogs are a thing and there for a reason.
  • 1
    Man, Jeff Bezos has really gone off his rocker since Musk overtook him as the richest person in the World, hasn't he?
  • 0
    @fristys Don't want to hear about that fraud anymore. Soon, he will be poorest person according to Big Short Seller.

    Killed my GF and she worshipped him more than I. At the end, they didn't pay for her life.
  • 0
    @Berkmann18 It broke within a year. I need LTS.

    At least 10 year or so. They are feel free to break it in 5-10 years.
  • 2
    As a side note, OSS developers that work for free _can_ actually do what the fuck they want.
  • 1
    @realJeffBezos If you need LTS you have to use a framework that has LTS releases.
  • 0
    @ReverendLovejoy They can't do what the fuck they want. Real Jeff Bezos can prove it. Legal systems are complex. Enough buffer overflows everywhere.

    One tactic comes to my mind is patent trolling
  • 0
    @ReverendLovejoy

    I guess my mind needs a lot of things.. LTS is just one of them.
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