21
Kristofu
10d

I love static sites and fancy new frameworks. Had an interview some time ago at a medium sized company. They specifically wanted someone to build static sites and introduce the company to Vue and Gridsome.
I got really excited for my first project. It was a wordpress site and I had to build a custom WP theme for it. Not exactly what I expected. Also I had no prior PHP knowledge, nor any experience with Wordpress. So I got really upset, because it wasn’t the technologies I was used to.
The first week was hard, I wanted to quit. But once something clicked. And I realized I know this. This is not PHP, not Wordpress, not Vue, but just simply a programming language. At the core everything programming language is the same. PHP became comfortable, Wordpress conventions didn’t bother me. I realized I can use great technologies with WP too. I get to know twig, added some sass, compiled everything nicely with webpack. And after a month I have a beautiful, fast and efficent site. I love it.
I realised that I don’t love the languages and frameworks. I love coding itself. I love creating efficent and reliable, clean code. No matter the architecture.
And my advice for you is to stop hating particular languages and serious debates on what is better, and hating your job when you can’t code in your new shiny framework. Love coding itself, because it’s a wonderful activity. We are creators, we are artists. Not <insert specific programming language here> developers.

Comments
  • 8
    Some languages are a bit shit tho (I'm reasonably experienced with 5 or so languages)
  • 4
    Like, R is weird, the notation for pass by value vs reference is odd,
  • 8
    @atheist Agreed, R is weird, and I hate the syntax. But it was designed for statistics, data science, etc., not normal development or programmers used to traditional languages like C.

    and iirc it’s just an extension of S?

    Regardless, it does what it does very well, so it’s hard to complain too much.
  • 4
    I will always hate JS.
  • 1
    @Kristofu So basically, you got rickrolled.
  • 1
    @Root Ha, yeah I'm a bit of a hybrid software engineer/data scientist, so dabbled with it a bit
  • 4
    @atheist fucking R is terrible. I am with you.
    I once got into a discussion on Twitter with a data scientist and R advocates the guy built a web server on R, arguing R is a general use thing, it can do wonders etc.

    The discussion ended with that guy telling me "Well no one asked you", to which I replied something like, "I see I just won the discussion, btw no one asked you either"
  • 2
    I like a variety of tools, languages and so on.

    Variety is the spice of life.
  • 4
    From what languages you mentioned i predict you to change your opinion about the sameness of all languages as soon as you stumble upon a more declarative language like Haskell, Erlang, OCaml - or even just SQL.
    Paradigms do matter.
  • 3
    I'm on with @Oktokolo here. Of course, coding is an art, but you'll also end up switching between the tools or rooting for the best you know, when you collaborate with someone.
    Once you try a declarative language and will it click, your preferences shake and evolve. And if you ever been grasping at straws before, this change is going to make you love coding more.
  • 1
    wait... you can use webpack to build Wordpress sites? please guide me, I'm so sick of dicking around in that stupid Wordpress UI
  • 3
    Most languages are useful to do something. The problem is that people usually want to use an axe to hit nails.
  • 3
  • 0
    @fjrevoredo
    No problem - with the right axe (not a joke).
  • 1
    @Oktokolo that's the problem... you can but it's not the best tool for the job and that's exactly why we usually think some languages and frameworks suck, people use them for things they weren't designed for.
  • 0
    @fjrevoredo
    It might not be the best tool. But it might be a tool, the user is skilled in and for the occasional (mis)use, it could still be good enough.
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