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rkzo
141d

I get assigned to lead projects where I have to interact with vendors form my home country. Rest of the time I work as a developer. I know it makes sense and I'm natural fit. But is it racism?

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  • 2
    Yes and no. Define racism. Definitions vary and according to which definition you use racism is not necessarily a bad thing.

    Simple definition: Differentiation by race. Therefore no. You are differentiated by language and cultural knowledge.

    More common definition: Assigning group characteristics to individuals of the group. Then yes, you as member of the group are expected to have cultural knowledge and language ability.

    But then recommending a black woman different hair products is also racist according to this decision. I think it's obvious that racism is not necessarily a bad thing.

    Then there are definitions in which racism must be negative. But people dislike it and speak about positive racism being bad. Asians good at maths.

    And then there are modern definitions that take position of power of said group into account, but those are BS, so let's move on.

    I think it's no more racist than asking the tall guy to take a box of the shelf. Good utilisation of resources.
  • 2
    What? No.

    At least nothing you described is.
  • 1
    I can understand the best person for the job argument. Isn't it stereotyping though?
    What about being looked over for other projects?
    I can say I'm definitely qualified in those other areas as well.
  • 1
    @rkzo

    Let's translate this in other skills. What if you had two devs. Both of them are good at frontend, but only one can do backend.

    Both are interested in doing the new frontend only project. A good manager would probably choose the frontend only dev, just to be sure he had the allrounder ready for whatever happens.

    And now about stereotyping. What if you don't have stereotypical qualities. Either you don't even speak the language or your social skills are so poor that it doesn't matter, you will lose the client.

    I think there is a difference between tested stereotypes and untested stereotypes.

    1. Let's assume race/sex x is dumb. So, x is not allowed at universities. That's racist or sexist.

    2. Or assume race/sex x is dumb. So they keep failing at university. Exceptional individuals succeed, though.

    3. Finally assume race/sex x is dumb. But we want them to succeed. So we make it easier for them.

    Which one of those are racist? Multiple choices are allowed.
  • 1
    As I'm saying it's not about the skill level. At least that's what I feel. I'm better in customer facing roles. I'm equal or better with coding and debugging skills which has been demonstrated and acknowledged by my peers too. In fact I'm put into difficult projects. The way I see it is I'm being used for my strengths without allowing me to grow or apply in other areas. This may be g8od from management POV but I feel I'm getting the raw end.
  • 1
    @TheCommoner282 it's not about dumb or intelligent.
    As I read it, its between ppl who are on par or almost on par.
  • 0
    @rkzo

    I just wanted to demonstrate that there is no good option. We're always racist. It's too broadly defined. Too many definitions.

    But I also wanted to showcase that the same situation could arise between you and management with non race/origin related reasons. E.g.: Being fullstack vs. frontend.

    I think the simple answer is, your management and you have differing goals. And because of it, what's best for management is not necessarily best for you.

    And as humans, we have a way of dealing with differing goals. Communication. You need to explain that you don't want to be funneled into a role you don't like, but want to develop evenly in multiple directions. Then find a compromise to suit you and your company, so that in the end everyone is unhappy.

    And if you cannot, you need to prioritise your needs over your company's needs. But that's the advice part. That wasn't your question. You asked if it's racist. Answer: In the broadest sense, sure. But specifically, nope.
  • 1
    @TheCommoner282 I get it and that's what I think is happening.
    Racist is probably not entirely correct term in this context. Bias or racial/cultural bias is more apt.
    I feel because I was the right fit for the project, I got the role.
    At the same time, I also feel the reverse is also true, i.e I didn't get the other jobs or got pigeon holed because of my or the other person's background.
    What I mean is who would you choose if all things equal, one person went to the same school as you or barracks for the same sports team
  • 0
    @rkzo I believe that if all other things are equal, people always choose whomever has the biggest tits.

    Which suits my quite well, because as a fat guy, I have big tits.
  • 1
    @TheCommoner282 lol. There's always some kind of bias. Nobody can escape that
  • 0
    xp tldr, you miss the 'joke' tag ?

    saw someone bitching about being "discriminated against" because theyre bulky and have to move things at jobs. but what? you gona make the 90lb skinny girl move over half her weight and the big guy crawl under tight spaces to plug something in?

    ya we're not equal. ya it'd be stupid to have ppl unfit for certain things do particular jobs. otherwise youre likely setting someone up for failure and that's unfair.
  • 0
    @zlice OMG, I think you missed the joke tag for your comment.
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