31
vane
72d

Actually the worst fucking developer experience is meeting those all knowing people who think they know everything but actually they even don’t know how the fucking tools they’re using every day are written and how they work.

Those people that think when they installed library it should do everything how they imagined to and don’t fucking bother to debug problems and create pull requests if it’s fucking buggy.

Those fucking ranters who moan about something they don’t understand.

Those fuckers who think if they understood what A*, Dijkstra, graph algorithm is they’re smarter then others.

No you fuckers you’re dumb as fuck cause instead of explaining it to someone you just blame people for not knowing “obvious shit”.

All those fucking ignorants I am fucking writing about you.
You either start support each other or fuck you people.

Comments
  • 6
    Ugh yes. There are so many of them too! I physically cringe every time some jackass goes to correct the professor in a lecture. M8, you read the book, good for you, but I think the guy knows what he's talking about and none of the rest of us came here to listen to you 🙄

    We have one at work as well. Why do people refuse to admit they don't know something? If you just say, chances are the person you're talking to won't mind explaining it to you and then you learned something rather than guess what it's about.

    Pet peeve of mine, I totally agree with you.
  • 4
    We hired a remote developer at my startup because I was busy with other projects. The agreement stated 3 weeks for few features. This is the 6th week, he hasn't shown sh*t.

    The last time he was at our co-working space and I saw he had issues with laravel migrations. "Do you have any issues? I can help.", I asked. He replied no.

    Something tells me he has been battling with migrations for 4 weeks. 😀😂
  • 1
    @Elyz while I mostly agree, some professors are full of shit. And no, often they don't know what they are talking about...
  • 1
    @Elyz "Why do people refuse to admit they don't know something?"

    Well, I can't talk for everyone, obviously, but for me it was pressure to prove how smart and professional I was.
    It took a while and some serious backlash before I understood, that coming up with some half-baked shit, presented as if it was the holy truth, lead to nowhere.

    So learning to admit that someone does not know something can be hard. But once I understood that going:
    "I don't know that, but will look it up and get back to you.",
    leads to faster and better results, everything got better.
    And in the end, showing others that you know what you don't know, but are willing to research/learn when needed, is actually a good thing for your reputation as well.
  • 2
    @mindev oh yeah there are obviously some that could easily be exchanged for literally anyone else who took 5 mins to Google the topic but I mean we had a guy in a lecture tell a man who had written several books and done research on the topic for 15+ years he was wrong. Just.. Sit down and shut up, you misunderstood. I think a lot of it is also in the tone. If you politely ask that the professor explain something again/clear something up vs. Raising your hand to say "ur wrong!". Rubs me the wrong way
  • 1
    @Elyz in that case I have to agree
  • 0
    @abdulmatinsanni good luck then
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