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In the 1990s code editors on the Mac could insert the omitted function prototypes into a header file with one command; and even automatically keep the header declaration updated when you changed the source definition (name, parameters, etc)

Today in Xcode you have to copy and paste the stupid function header definition from the source code into the header file. What happens if you leave the "{" that got copied accidentally? OMFUCKING LORD, it triggers all sorts of erroneous errors in all the **source code** files where it is included instead of the header with the stray "{"

I started to question whether nor not I knew C, if gravity worked, if the sun would come up. I wasted a day of dicking around in StackOverflow trying to chase down all these insane error messages which make no sense in Xcode.

I just **happened** to see at the bottom of one of the source files, after all the erroneous error, a very important error:

"};" Expected

So I started deleting code from the bottom up in this source file, same error every time. Got to the point where the includes were all that was left.

FUCK YOU XCODE and the hacks that designed that horrendous piece of shit

Xcode is only free if your time is worth absolutely nothing.

Comments
  • 2
    Worst software ever made. Also freezing alot ....

    There is a special place for it in hell..
  • 1
    Now that I have overcome Xcode stupidity, and having made quite a few changes to the code base, I can't remember what the hell I was originally working on for a goal when Xcode shit the bed.
  • 4
    Username checks out.
  • 1
    I was waiting on my new company to get approval for a resharper license and almost got crazy on how stupid visual studio is without it.
    My job is not to remember namespaces or to not make typos, the ide must handle all that stuff for me.
  • 1
    Yeah, and a 10GB download to bring that piece of shit software to your machine. Forced auto updates removing your old SDK's that you need for backwards compatibility.

    Quite some shit show.

    (Thanks for what deserves to be named rant!)
  • 0
    In the 90-ies the Mac would freeze every two hours due to not having memory protection. So you would have to reboot at least three times in a working day. And loose your work at least once. Those were the days.
  • 2
    I'm really happy to be a Linux/Windows dev.

    Especially because the apple keyboards really hurt my pinkie. Copy&paste is horrible on those.
  • 0
    @Emphiliis

    You know that Macs work fine with an external keyboard, right? Just like Windows and Linux.
  • 1
    I @bahua

    I know, but the place I worked for did not like this.
  • 1
    Holy shit that last line is SCATHING
  • 1
    @Ubbe There were good Mac OS extension and shitty ones and the associated reboots. Pre-Mac OS X there was no such thing as FTFF. The Finder was God. I have lost an order of magnitude more time and data on Mac OS X than I did from 1984 to 2000 on MacOS. macOS is a system plagued by cache corruption, privilege errors and security problems. My Mac 128 boots up faster from a god damn floppy disk than this piece of shit MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2017), 2.9 GHz Intel Core i7, 16 GB 2133 MHz LPDDR3, 512GB HD.

    Today I run a FUCK-TON of memory and disk space and do 50% more on my Mac than I did on my Mac II FX.

    Today's macOS 10.15 is a horrendously inefficient piece of buggy-ass shit... and Xcode both is responsible for this, and exemplifies it in its absurd footprint.

    Plenty of venom for macOS and Xcode, not for you bro... unless you work for Apple on the Xcode team.
  • 0
    @xcodesucks MacOs at the time was horribly unstable in the setup I had to use, but that would surely depend on the software you ran. I do remember how incredibly slow the first versions of osX where even on those big silver boxes that Jobs claimed where the fastest computers in the world. Even the cursor moved like it was stuck in molasses. Haven't used Apple computers since.
  • 1
    @Ubbe Agreed! I think I aged in internet speed when MacOS X 10.0, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3 existed. Jobs did a lot of things right but ditching OpenDoc for Java (then doing a 180 on Java), ditching Mac OS 9 for bloated NeXT/BSD, ditching Newton (ahem, iPhone grandaddy) were not the finest hours.
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