12
bartmr
17d

I love how CS universities teach stuff like every student there is going to create a programming language from scratch, but none of the real world stuff. Then people get surprised that bootcamp students get promotions twice as fast.

Comments
  • 1
    Should have done the research before you enrolled!
  • 7
    Theory vs practical knowledge.

    You need both, but practical knowledge gets you hired quicker, theoretical knowledge is needed for large scale applications and understanding how to make performance increases, or better yet, how to spot degrading code early.
  • 5
    @C0D4 Agreed. It might be easy to use existing frameworks at the basic or even intermediate level after boot camp lessons, but knowing the CS fundamentals gives the intuition necessary to design new things correctly
  • 3
    I get paid for making programming languages.

    Dont go to college if you wanna be a php developer.
  • 0
    @tekashi I'm just going to agree to disagree on that one.

    Not all php devs are useless copy/pasta devs.
  • 0
  • 1
    I've studied Electronic Engineering and the stuff they teach you does not particularly help you in getting a job, but they do help when learning abstract concepts and you've got more extensive knowledge about how computers work (Ever delve into the TCP/IP Stack? or how to schedule processes?). You become a really fast learner because of all those theoretical knowledge
  • 3
    Agree with @C0D4 and @programmer. A bootcamp has its uses for a quick buck but you'll get more foresight if you have a degree (or tried to get a degree) that will explain the more fundamental principles behind programming languages and program logic formulation.
  • 0
    Long term vs short term. Also the prior will require more self motivation to practice. The other one is the whip strategy. “Make it happen mother fuck or quit”.
  • 0
    "Then people get surprised that bootcamp students get promotions twice as fast"

    Greatly depends on the bubble you're in. I sure know at least one company where bootcamp students would get promoted quickly for "delivering results". OTOH I know several others that wouldn't grant too much responsibility to them, because while "delivering results" is an important skill, so is "maintaining results". It takes time to see whether you possess that skill or not.
  • 1
    It's me again. Well, but I never had to use the concepts in my job, and my job is almost creating full stack services for startups. I didn't know how network layers worked till I had too. Now I switched to an AI company, and I'll have to learn more stuff too, without ever needing to put my shoes in a college. While much of my ex-ex-colleagues were slow to catch on to new stuff or were super inflexible.

    Bottom line: bootcamp people are much more flexible to quick learning and speak in more human terms. College people just want to stick with the safe way of life, without rocking the boat much. They're the kind of people who write 4 or 5 lines of JAVA on an already built architecture and don't want any more trouble.
  • 2
    @bartmr "bootcamp people are much more flexible to quick learning and speak in more human terms. College people just want to stick with the safe way of life"

    I think that is an overgeneralization.
  • 1
    @bartmr I agree with @VaderNT, that's insane overgeneralization, considering some of the people I know from college do some pretty crazy stuff. Sure, a fraction of college people will be like what you described, but that is by no means a general thing. For that matter I've seen so, so many bootcamp devs who are absolutely awful and can barely put together a simple website.

    Personally I think it depends on the person, whether you go to college or bootcamp doesn't matter as much as whether you're curious, wiling to explore, and can get shit done properly. College just gives you a lot more options in CS and the academic environment.
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