29
pandasama
16d

Different Timezones are horrible

Comments
  • 4
    Well, if you have another way to solve that problem, we're all ears.
  • 4
    Different timezone is nothing as compare to when countries switches to daylight saving and u are in a country where there is no concept daylight saving. (in my opinion, DS is useless in modern era, but that's my opinion)
  • 1
    Wish the earth was flat huh
  • 0
    @Jilano I don’t, that’s why I’m ranting
  • 0
    For context, I need permissions to do a thing but for those permissions I have to wait for the guy in another country to wake up and get to work, which is at the end of my day, which makes my day useless
  • 3
    @pandasama Aaah, that's nothing..
    Try debugging what happened with db in one tz, server in a diff tz and client in another..with the system that doesn't habdle tz in any way.. it's awesome!
  • 1
    @sladuled I really hope I never have to experience that
  • 1
    You never see this issue in Star Trek..
  • 1
    I'm reminded of when I wanted to send a parcel to another country once.

    When the local office was open, the distant one was closed..
  • 0
    @Nanos that’s a pain
  • 2
    @sladuled once i got totally mind fucked while trying to set up a JS countdown for an event on 9 websites which are 9 markets across 3 timezones, while the server for my ajax req is in a different tz than me
  • 0
  • 0
    @pandasama

    Even worse than that, when I tried to ring them, I only had a rotary phone, whilst they had a touch tone switchboard !
  • 1
    @Nanos Aaaah rotary phones
  • 1
    @webdev Very nice!! O.o 🤣🤣🤣🤣
    I effing hate tz..
  • 2
    Store all data in UTC. Problem solved.
    Add a client-side helper to go from UTC to local time.
    Works like a charm.

    Don't forget Martian timezone :

    https://timeanddate.com/news/time/...
  • 1
    @Nanos you also never see them using GPS. How do they know where they are in time and space? Do they work it out mathematically? AND how the fuck do they always arrive to other ships and stations completely parallel to each other? Like they're on some sort of 2D flat space plain? Or did everyone just agree that theres an "up" and "down" in space?
Add Comment