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Comments
  • 5
    Yep.
    And what's funny, some people throw physics out of this question and say "0" with absolute confidence. Well, because it didn't specify thickness of the cable, it would be right to notice that cable itself was ideal 0, but I dare to defy this nonsense (which question also is).
  • 4
    TL;DR 80 m long real life cable bent in half won't make it exactly 40 m in height. Like, never.
  • 0
    I hope this is ironic
  • 0
    The fact that there is no c++ category messes me up
  • 2
    Also the answer should be 80 divided by 🍰
  • 1
    The cable is ? units long. It says so right there on the diagram.

    Duh.

    ðŸĪŠ
  • 0
    Wouldn't the poles be inside one another? If you cut the cable in half it's 40m and would be 10m above the ground just hanging down, so there is no possibility to let it hang diagonally and 10m above the ground or am I just dumb right now?
  • 0
    @Crowns You see, it's only one of interpretations on this image. Original question had no image, I believe. But even if so, question DOES NOT contain additional mandatory parameters to get exact results. Long story short, this is too abstract and not scientific.
    In case of idealistic 0-thickness cable it seems possible to bent 80 m long one in two halves in exact height of 40 m, but such a thing simply doesn't exist in our real world. To really get such height with both halves, you'll need to cut the cable, which is also, out of question, absurdity.
    About poles: other story! Question does not indicate what junctures and in which positions both cable's ends were attached to poles.

    If it's really Amazon's interview question, then I am Nikola Tesla 😂
  • 0
    @vintprox I found out I was right about it. The only solution ist 0m. You can read it up here if you want to. https://mindyourdecisions.com/blog/...
  • 0
    @Crowns it does not explain the bent near by the cable's middle at all. If you've got to simulate this twist of any thick cable, you'd notice that height is not exactly 40 m (!). It also applies to thin ones.
    We cannot throw physics like this: any electrician would agree. ðŸĪ”
  • 0
    @vintprox yeah I know it ignores such things and it is actually not possible in the real world. But as far as I know, we ignored such minor details in school like there is no air resistance and everything is placed in the ideal world. 👀
  • 2
    @Crowns well, then these questions belong to ideal world, which our is not. ðŸĪ·‍♂ïļ I think of it as fundamental misunderstanding in context of *real life* job interview. As I stated, question is so vague that it makes almost no sense.
  • 0
    Quick, do this challenge and post the code
  • 0
    I would assume there is an error in one of the measurements. Otherwise the entire setup is miss represented...
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