9
Lorip1970
61d

Fucking java library publishing. It's a nightmare. You have to fucking own a domain to publish a shit onto jcenter/bintray/whatever. You have to own the domain, that your lib's package name is. And you MUST verify it, otherwise you won't publish anything. Or you can shit allover your lib with package name like com.github.dumbcoder.mycoollib.

You must to create a ticket for some shitheads that are going to verify your shit for two weeks. They gonna ask you for source.jar, docs.jar and whatever shit.jar they need.

What THE fuck? Who was the asshole that decided name packages in reverse domain name? No FUCKING more ecosystem has such a bullshit. In .net you just make a lib, create a free nuget account, fill some basic info and boom! you have .net package published. Same for npm and rust for example.

Because the fucking package name should be just for structure not for a some dick to own it. Namespace is name-fucking-space.
FUCK JAVA.

Comments
  • 8
    To be fair, using reverse-DNS is quite smart. It ensures global uniqueness between package names. And it's not like you actually reference the package name outside of your import statements. Don't get me wrong, I'm not a big fan of Java, but it's package naming isn't that bad at all.
  • 1
    @ScriptCoded it would be smart if the package (library) name and namespace were separate things.

    Again, in rust,.net,node there is no such a problem. you just give your package (not namespace) some unique name, publish it and be happy.
    No domains, no verification and shit. Simple and useful.
  • 2
    @Lorip1970 speaking for node: no, it's bullshit.
    Is it pixijs? pixi.js? pixi? goodboy-pixi? Having no namespace at all is just bullshit. You never know which package fits your needs, especially because forks can look the same as their originals.

    Java is actually for enterprise. It's for big boi stuff, where failure is no option and mistakes are no "welp it happened" things ^^
  • 2
    @nitwhiz "It's for big boi stuff". Not sure that really means anything

    I've done consulting work for a lot of big bois (Fortune 500 companies) and all the ones that had Java apps seemed to be doing whatever they could to get off them

    Sure, Java has it's place, but it's not the only reasonable solution for priority systems
  • 1
    @bebetter of course not, and I'd never use java in critical applications but that's what it was "made" for initially.
  • 2
    @ScriptCoded Reverse DNS is a bad implementation of a good idea. It costs money and requires maintenance, and is therefore not future-proof.

    Being able to import by path, having a module system, and being able to alias imports if required is far more forwards-thinking.
  • 0
    Stop coding in Java. Stop using software that uses Java. Shun developers and companies that insist on using Java.
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