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So I just had to tell three people to read the fucking docs in the comments of an AUR package.

They complained about linker errors, figured "oh happens with GCC 10, doesn't with GCC 9, let's use GCC 9".

If they had read the docs, they'd know that maybe, all that was needed to be able to compile the code was a single command-line flag. `-fcommon`.

People, just RTFM. If you see "oh upgrading from version X to version Y causes some issue", look up "porting from S X to Y", and find something like this: https://gcc.gnu.org/gcc-10/...

Was it so hard? Yes? Then why are you compiling any packages for yourself with a PKGBUILD when you should rather just stick to the non-customized packages built by people that know what they're doing, from the repositories?

Comments
  • 1
    @torbal Mine or those of the non-RTFMing people?
  • 3
    @torbal Arch is easy. Only when you venture into the AUR do you really need to RTFM.
  • 3
    @EmberQuill Exactly. That's why I said that the non-RTFMing people should stick to repo packages. I dislike the attitude of "uh dependency break stuff, let's stay on old version", because that's exactly how we got the current state of Debian-based distros.
  • 1
    @torbal Yo. I am talking about the AUR. You are expected to read shit and figure out shit. If you stick to repo packages that break stuff, then you can raise an issue about that. However, the AUR is the wild west, full of packages that will be orphaned one day after you installed it, and those that don't work. Recommending to use old versions of something is misleading other users into installing an old version of a package, that potentially affects compilation for other packages as well. That's why I react this way.
  • 6
    @torbal I did not tell them to RTFM. I did not yell at them. I linked them to the page I linked in the rant, and explained the issue.

    I don't lash out at them.

    This, however, is devRant, the place to vent frustration for this kind of shit to. So that's what I did.
  • 2
    Yeah, I guess the first sentence in this rant is misleading. I should've phrased it a little bit differently. Or just inserted "in a friendly way". Oh well, whatever.
  • 0
    Part of this attitude might also be me maintaining two related packages that happen to be dependencies of that package.
  • 2
    As a Gentoo user i actually expect compiling from source to just work without me needing to add compile flags myself. It is the package manager's job to handle low-level stuff like that...
  • 1
    @Oktokolo well Gentoos repos just work, which is part of why I love it
  • 0
    @Oktokolo Yes, but when you need that flag to be manually added to prevent a linker error, this probably has to be manually done on Gentoo as well.
  • 1
    Who THE FUCK declares external global variables without "extern"?! That has always been wrong.
  • 2
    @Oktokolo To be fair, Arch should be just as easy. Everything should be set up in the PKGBUILD so you can just clone the repo and run a single command to build and install the package. But, as with anything you build from source, you can rarely run into weird edge cases, which is what I assume happened here.
  • 1
    @Oktokolo Only if something is available as package, and then you don't need to compile at all with binary distros.

    If you have to compile shitty source code from tarball and upstream has not tested building with GCC 10, Gentoo runs into the same issue as other distros.
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop Wine devs. Or maybe Valve devs. Not sure.
  • 0
    @kescherRant
    Yes, sometimes you need to enable a Use-Flag on some package to get it compiled with a feature built in or to make it compatible with your environment.
    But in the latter case, the package manager tells you this before it even starts downloading the source. And it also offers to add the flag for you...
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop
    If there is no package in the standard repo or one of the better-known inofficial repos, it most often isn't worth trying anyway.
    There are exceptions (Games would be one *g*). But my work machine currently is standard repo only again.
    There are still some Python2 packages - but that would be better contained in a rant of itself...
  • 2
    @Oktokolo I always end up installing a few AUR packages on every Arch machine that lasts longer than a week or two. The new laptop I got a few months ago already has 21 AUR packages, including a lightdm greeter, a few fonts, polybar, Bitwarden, VSCode, a few esoteric utilities that aren't widely-used enough to get into an official repo, etc. And I use that laptop almost exclusively for web browsing and coding.
  • 2
    @Oktokolo There are e.g. tons of interesting chess engines other than Stockfish that you won't find in any repo. For Windows, you'll find ready-made binaries, but since Linux is always a PITA for application deployment, it's makefile or buildscript.
  • 2
    @Fast-Nop Hence, AUR is helpful as fuck on Arch. Other distros should adopt a "common user-made packages repository where users are advised to check what the fuck they're installing" approach too.
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop
    Five different engines in the distro repo should really be enough:
    https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Chess
  • 2
    @Oktokolo There are hundreds of engines, and limiting one's options through "oh not in the repo" is a phenomenon that you only see with Linux and iOS.

    Oh, and let's just take Stockfish. As per https://blog.stockfishchess.org/pos... , version 11 was released on 2020-Jan-15, half a year ago. However as per https://packages.gentoo.org/package... , the Gentoo status of Stockfish 11 is still "testing".

    Mind you, that's how slow it goes even for one of the most important OSS chess engines. You don't want to know how slow that process is for other stuff.

    Also, there's one prominent top engine that's missing in the link you gave - Leela Chess Zero.
  • 2
    @Fast-Nop deb files are pretty common to find too, part of the reason I use debian. Not as common as .exe tho
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