7
neeno
23d

Fucking hell I'm turning into one of those pricks that think everyone is less competent than them, how do I go back? I guess I'm not as humble as I thought I was ._.

Comments
  • 8
    When you get the tick, start by asking exploratory questions to see if that is the case. Even if you turn into that person, it'll keep you honest.
  • 3
    I guess... it's honest?
  • 7
    It's hard not to become that way when you see certain people every day. I'm amazed how some were able to live for that long, honestly.
  • 6
    Separate thought: being humble is having power and choosing not to exert it. If you are not operating from a position of power, it's not possible to be humble in that context.

    Not a fan personally. Most every time someone has told me to "be humble," it's just been a coded manner of telling me to know my place and a method of justifying their out of hand disregarding of my input.
  • 1
  • 2
    @SortOfTested yeah, I have to ask first and then make conclusions, not the other way around (which I just did).

    Basically a friend of mine wrote the spec for an assignment we're doing together and he put all class fields in the spec. I didn't say anything to him, but I thought it was stupid. Turns out the teacher specifically asked to put the class fields in the spec. I was thinking about the spec as an overview of how the classes interact, but the teacher wants an actual spec. Anyways, knowing my friend doesn't know as much as I do about programming (he's a newbie) I just assumed he put the fields in the spec "just because", but it turns out he did exactly what the teacher asked. In the end no harm was done, but I still think it was quite douchy of me to just assume his work was garbage.
  • 1
    @SortOfTested I like your definition of humble, but I don't think that's all being humble is about. To me, being humble is also about not bragging and not making others feel shit for something they did with good intentions.

    My definition is probably far from perfect, but I'm awful with words so that's all I got.
  • 1
    @neeno
    We just just call that not being an asshole 😋 americans basically attach either genitals or typically covered body parts to any given situation.
  • 2
    What's the saying... look before you leap.

    Basically, it's ok to be that douchebag, but don't assert the douchebag unless you can validate you are right.
  • 2
    I've definitely benefitted from always "being critical of criticizing others" no matter how obviously wrong they are doing things. Time and again it turns out they either had a reason for doing it "wrong" or I was the one not seeing how this was actually the better way of doing things.

    Related rant:
    https://devrant.com/rants/2769629/...

    I also make a huge distinction between people just not having experience in a thing vs. not giving a fuck about their work. Commit messages going "asdf" or "." triggers me more than iffy code.

    It's still easy to default to a mindset where all my faults have valid reasons where others' are out of incompetence and malice.
  • 2
    Listen to Humble by Kendrick Lamar. And when you start feeling not humble say to yourself "bitch sit down.....be humble"

    What @SortOfTested said is true. Exploratory questions are a good way to catch and understand other people's train of thought. My boss does that to a lot of people during meetings, he does it when he feels they are being incompetent or negligent in their decisions, 9 times out of 10 the dude is right, but he does it in a way in which it lets them completely consider what they are attempting to do. Some find it infuriating, I have seen it personally, but he is trying for them to see why shit won't work rather than him just flat out telling them.

    It might just be that you really are surrounded by incompetent people as it happens in any professional setting. As long as you don't act unprofessional about it then you probably are fine. Recognizing this trait about yourself is good also.
  • 0
    post a question to stack overflow
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