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I am really considering teaching my wife how to code just so she can understand my rants better

I feel like the gravity of my ranting is not communicated well enough without programming context

Comments
  • 2
    What is her background? Does she cook?
  • 0
    @Demolishun haha yes she does cook. Masters in economics/accounting. Why?
  • 2
    @signedadam You could introduce the concepts as recipes. Also, since she has math, you can introduce them as formulas.

    Does she script formulas in spreadsheets?
  • 1
    @Demolishun no scripting.

    Concepts as recipes how? How do you introduce for example a loop as a recipe?
  • 2
    @signedadam Repeated steps. Maybe kneading dough over and over until a condition is met. Stirring stuff in a bowl. Stir until a condition is met. Cutting up food. Keep cutting until the food is a specific size (the condition).
  • 0
    @Demolishun huh. I am going to try this. Thanks Demo!
  • 4
    @Demolishun @signedadam I just bought mine a robot 🤷🏻‍♀️ (Pololu 3Pi)

    She loves robots, and this one’s programmable. I helped her with C, and she ended up writing some to make it do a countdown on its little LCD screen, and then play a diddy. She was thrilled. After that, I tried teaching her some Python, but that didn’t go well because of schedules. (She wanted to make new bosses for Undertale.)

    But really, I try to explain the issues i run into with analogies, like:

    Imagine you are driving home, and you pull into the driveway. You shut off the car, and when you get out, you realize you’re in your neighbor’s driveway. “That’s strange,” you think, and you get back in the car, pull out, and drive to our house, make sure it’s the right house, and pull in. But after you pull in, you realize you’re at the neighbor’s house again. No matter what you do, you always end up at the neighbor’s house. Doesn’t matter if you drive around the block, go to the store, etc. As soon as you pull into our driveway, you’re at the neighbor’s house. But the really weird part? It doesn’t happen with anyone else’s driveways; you can pull into those just fine.
  • 1
    @Demolishun that's a good analogy. You could think that in OOP you have multiple people in the kitchen and you can ask them to bugger off by calling methods.
  • 2
    @Root in that story everyone would think the person behind the wheel is crazy as they're driving around and constantly pulling into everyone's driveway and immediately leaving. In real life, the person is the developer who is trying to debug the problem. No wonder they are losing their sanity.
  • 1
    I wrote this a while ago, sometimes it’s difficult when she doesn’t understand...

    https://agilesyndro.me/blog/...
  • 0
    @devphobe loved your story. Your wife seems cool.

    Mine is cool as heck too but she doesn't care about anything dev related so that's minus cool points right there 😡
  • 1
    The problem with the cooking and math metaphors may be that you can't translate abstract problems (the ones that screw me up the most) very well. Things like random errors because of a weird totally illogical compiler feature
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