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Driving though Malmö today is like when you've got five stars in GTA. Blue blinking lights and roadblocks everywhere.

Comments
  • 2
    Did I miss something?
  • 4
    @Ranchonyx

    Just a normal day
  • 2
    @Ranchonyx @Linux There's a big conference against antisemitism, but they located the participants hotels on the other side of town, so there is a long strip of road closed right across the whole city...
  • 5
    @Ranchonyx sweden is also a syrian battle field. Where ex IS and Kurds shoot themselves in swedish social housing.
  • 3
    @ScriptCoded It's probably not the best location for a conference against antisemitism
  • 4
    @NickyBones It's only antisemitism if it's white nazi scum beating up Jews. Imported Muslims beating up Jews doesn't count as antisemitism, but as multicultural enrichment.
  • 2
    @Fast-Nop Yeah, people who are not the victims of antisemitism have the privilege to make all sorts of imaginary divisions.
    When my Jew-Spidey-sense tingles, I run. Fast.
  • 2
    @NickyBones How comes it wouldn't be that? Just curious
  • 1
    @ScriptCoded

    Like a normal day in Malmö
  • 5
    @ScriptCoded Yeah, why wouldn't you host a conference against antisemitism in a place where you have imported tons of Jew-hating Muslims? What could possibly go wrong?
  • 4
    @ScriptCoded If you need so much police to secure a wholesome and peaceful event, you are probably doing it in the wrong place.
    I heard about a lot of Jewish people leaving Malmo in the last decade because life got unbearable and the mayor was in denial about the problem for a very long time.
  • 3
    @NickyBones I once made a role play game model of progressivism that reflects their reality extremely well. Works by score assignment in conflicts, and the one with the higher score always wins.
  • 2
    @NickyBones Existence:
    +4 not white
    +2 not male
    +1 not hetero

    Actions:
    +4 for actions incompatible with Western culture
    -4 for right wing (defined arbitrarily)
  • 2
    @NickyBones If a Nazi (-1 at most if lesbian) beats up a Jew (minimum +0 if white, male and hetero), then the Nazi loses. If a male hetero Muslim migrant (+4) is the offender, he acts because of Islam (+4) and comes out at +8. The Jewish victim loses even if she is lesbian (+3) and non-white (+4).

    What about gays and muslims? A white gay earns +1 while a migrant gets +4 even if he is just a hetero man. If the gay is also a migrant, he has +5, but the bully migrant gets another +4 on top because beating up the gay is multi culturalism, that's +8, and the gay loses again.

    What about suppression of Muslim women? They get to +6 (or +7 if lesbian) while the male hetero Muslim only has +4. But since he is acting in a multi cultural way, he gets another +4, yielding +8, so the female victim loses.
  • 3
    @Fast-Nop
    That is a way better definition of contemporary Cynicism than Wikipedia offers.
  • 3
    @Fast-Nop Well, a while ago the Jews were losing at like -6000000, so it would fairer if being a Jew is at least +5.
  • 4
    @NickyBones Here's the problem: Jews have contributed to Western culture. There are disproportionately many Jews e.g. among scientists and other fields - anything that requires excellence.

    That's something progressives will never forgive Jews.
  • 1
    @NickyBones Nothing I've heard about, but I guess that's the problem. Though we don't really have a mayor. But yeah, the police seems excessive. It's practically never like this. I've never seen it before in my whole short life
  • 3
    @Fast-Nop As a PhD candidate, I am solemnly committed to sabotaging the image of Jews as contributors to science.
  • 2
    @Fast-Nop Sounds really fun, we should publish it as a mobile app! You know mobile programming, right? I don't know mobile, but I'm really good at presenting ideas! We'd make a great team!
  • 2
    @ScriptCoded The mayor was a guy named Reepalu. I know there were incidents of physical violence against Jews and attacks against Jewish facilities (e.g. cemetery). But I can get more details from people who left if you're interested.
  • 3
    @NickyBones Yeah, your PhD career didn't escape me in this regard. It gets even worse when you have success through your own hard work and intelligence - that's something progressives also hate. You'd score better with them as drug addict on social aid.

    @ScriptCoded Well I'm good at embedded stuff, not at mobile, and the only mobile dev thing I even use is the Android NDK for raw C programs. :)
  • 2
    @Fast-Nop Never too late to develop a drug addiction. I heard the social benefits here in Germany are quite good :)
  • 2
    @NickyBones The Jewish exodus isn't just Sweden. I read the same about France - and even Germany, although the mainstream press avoids covering that.

    Some years back, Jews even approached the German right-wing party AfD - and the answer from the right-wingers was like "sure, you're Germans, be welcome." That's the same party that also has people arguing over crap like the "honour of the German military in WW2", so they are pretty right-wing. And their female lead is lesbian. Quite strange.
  • 2
    @Fast-Nop Yeah, I am originally from Belgium and the community there shrank dramatically.
    Trying to befriend the AfD just shows these Jews didn't learn a lesson from history...
  • 1
    @NickyBones That move was controversial indeed even among German Jews. Their central council condemned that - but it's also lack of better options, except leaving Europe altogether.

    Meanwhile, I can just hope shit will still last for another generation, then I'll be gone anyway and don't have to care.
  • 2
    @Fast-Nop Leaving Europe is the only logical move. Not sure where we should go though.
  • 1
    @NickyBones Which I think is pretty sad. I regard Jews in Germany not primarily as Jews that happen to be in Germany, but as Germans that happen to have Jewish faith or tradition.

    Indicentally, I dislike all three Abrahamitic religions because I think the angry desert troll they revere just sucks, but Judaism is the only one out of them that won't bother others so that it's "you do your thing, I do mine, and we don't interfere with that stuff."
  • 2
    @Fast-Nop Judaism was always a very separatist religion. It's super hard to convert, and I guess it's one of the reasons we're hated - because we're seen as elitists.
    But when orthodox Jews gain power, as occurred in Israeli politics, they try to dictate every aspect of other people's life. So I hate all Abrahamic religions equally.
  • 1
    @NickyBones There is a reason why the Egyptians dealt with Akhenaten swiftly and brutally so that his idea of monotheism got stopped. The Neteru in Egypt were not actually gods, but we don't have good translations for that.

    Having a polytheist tradition implies that some concepts comparable to gods are always somewhat at odds with each other. That leaves the people with a tradition that has to cope with mutually contradicting aspects instead of having The One Truth.
  • 1
    @NickyBones
    Rarely there are occasions where leaving isn't an option - this is one. You will find xenophobics everywhere (well, maybe except in Israel for your case - but that country is basically defined by being constantly at war...).

    Better options:

    - Just don't tell the baddies your religion.
    Religion isn't as easy to spot as skin color.

    - Get involved in political activism to raise awereness and show the non-jews, that you are just normal people too.
    This option obviously is way more risky than the other - but the potential benefit is to reduce antisemitism for everyone.
  • 2
    @Fast-Nop Oh I'm sure you'll figure out a way. We'll split the earnings 50/50!

    @NickyBones

    Won't get in to this whole political discussion though... Never ends well, partly because I've usually not read up on things well enough.
  • 1
    @Oktokolo You just won't succeed in raising awareness for antisemitism with Muslims because they are already perfectly aware of it. By and large, they condone it, at least tacitely.

    I have a co-worker with whom I was already close at work for years. We bonded because we both like chess. At one occasion, he told me he was a Jew, and I joked "now I see why you're good at chess", which he took in good humour. :)
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop
    Not all muslims are antisemites.
    But in Europe, awareness campaigns would probably mostly target the majority of the casual conservative "christians".

    The goal isn't to convince the extremists, but to raise goodwill in the non-extremists. Then, when the extremists act, they will meet at least some resistance in the general public.
  • 2
    @Oktokolo What "resistance" would that be? Some tweets or what?

    The thing in Europe isn't the oldschool antisemitisism. Sure, there are always some native fringe idiots who don't get that Auschwitz was a bad idea, but that's not what is on the rise and makes Jews leave.
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop
    Nobody cares about tweets. But it makes a huge difference whether the public just looks away when thugs beat someone up - or at least call the police.

    If most don't care, the ones who care, have free reign.
    By default, that are the extremists in current societies.
    But it doesn't have to be that way. There are low-risk ways to help.
  • 1
    @Oktokolo Calling the police is formally correct, but pointless. When you need them, they are not there, and when they are arrive, they are useless.

    What would help is stepping in directly and using brutal violence to sort shit out. I am fully capable of doing that, but then you'll face rabid judges who don't understand such situations because they are shielded middle-class folks with no experience in street violence and its requirements.

    They are at least as dangerous as the thugs themselves, so better don't step in and just let things happen.
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop
    That shielded middle-class folks could be made more aware of the reality on the street. Then they maybe would judge better.
  • 1
    While we are at it blaming religions for violence and bigotry, which is of course not unfounded, I think it is good to remember the other side of the coin. The nazis where mystics but strongly anti religious. Stalin, Hitler, Mao, Pol Pot. All the major murderers of the 20th century where atheist with the possible exception of the turks who slaughtered the Armenians. Yet nobody ever talks about the guilt of atheism?
  • 3
    @Oktokolo Being a Jew is also an ethnicity. This is why even if you converted to Christianity the Nazis would have sent you to the camps.
    I am not practicing any religion, but people connect the dots - they see I was educated in Israel.
    Jews handle the small town antisemitism, of people who think we have a tail or horns, quite well. It's the new wave of attacks against Jews that is unbearable. And the governments all over Europe cower in face of this new threat, so as our non-Jewish neighbors. Nobody wants to get beaten up by a group of angry youth.
    We now recognize better when we are unwanted in Europe, and I hope Jews will not go like sheep to the slaughter once again.
  • 1
    @Ubbe I wouldn't say it's the guilt of atheism. These conflicts were not driven by the desire to spread atheism. It was just atrocious deeds committed by non-religious people.
    No one said that atheist can't be terrible people, only that (Abrahamic) religion has the tendency to seek more and more power.
  • 2
    @NickyBones I agree with what you say. But I am not sure that it is irrelevant that all these extremely evil people where atheists. I do believe there is a pattern there. No creed is immune to evil but some are even more prone to disregarding human life than others.
  • 0
    @Ubbe
    Religion is just a tool for bonding a group together and control it by defining their world view.
    The same can be achieved by other means if you don't have a hundred years to groom a new religion.
    Tribalism and propaganda do work well too and the Nazis really excelled at it.
    Not sure, how the communists did it - i guess, they just applied harsh brutality against "their" own people. And that obviously somewhat works too - especially while being at war and literally fighting over your own land.

    By the way: Watch Riefenstahl's movies, they not only show that excellent propaganda execution in her works for the Nazis, but also should still be the gold standard for movie making - but sadly aren't.
  • 0
    @NickyBones
    The group of angry youth shouldn't know your curiculum vitae and after some years of experience, nobody else is interested in it either.

    But yes, if such groups exist and roam your neighborhood, that is alarming indeed.

    WTF happened there, that the youth has no better things to do (like playing games or mating)?
    If they blame others for something, that most likely is, what happened to them (but most likely not due to the ones they blame) or what they fear will happen to them.
  • 2
    @NickyBones Also it looks like a lot of dislikes and straight up antisemitism towards jews comes from people taken a side in the conflict between israel and palestine. At least its how i feel is the common reason for people to justify their antisemitism.
  • 1
    @Oktokolo That group of youth might just hear me talking Hebrew on the phone with my parents. Or they might overhear me talking to friends in a public place.
    One of my non-Jewish friends, her parents instructed her not to say "Israel" or something related to Judaism when we are taking the train/tram/bus. They said it attracts the wrong kind of attention, and they are spot on.
    As for resume, I am on the university website, and a lot of students look up my LinkedIn. It's quite easy to find information on people today.
    These youth are not really allowed to mate due to religion, so they just play real life GTA.
  • 3
    @Frederick Yeah, I actually noticed this thinly veiled, SJW version of antisemitism from young German people too. I think it's totally acceptable to criticize the policy of a certain country, but justifying the assault of Jews living in Europe because of the situation in Israel is a whole different story. Happened to me in uni a few months ago.
  • 2
    @NickyBones I am sorry to hear that. Agreed, i personally dislike a lot a of countries due their poltics. Nothing to do with their culture or the people themselves. Since actually find enjoy in travel and experiance diffrent cultures than mine.
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