61

How the original creator sees their code:

while (true) {
postGuildCount();
}

how contributors see his code :

/[-a-zA-Z0-9@:%_\+.~#?&//=]{2,256}\.[a-z]{2,4}\b(\/[-a-zA-Z0-9@:%_\+.~#?&//=]*)?/

Comments
  • 4
    That last bit looks like output code from a message encrypter i made a while back xD
  • 11
    @Cyanite this is a RegExp though XD
  • 1
    @caramelCase If its not BATCH, BASH, or Python, I have no idea..
  • 13
    I'm curious about that regex's usecase
  • 0
    Not a valid regex though is it? I see too many hyphens ("-") at the beginning.?
  • 1
    @eldamir the first hyphen? It's within a character set, allowing that set to match a hyphen. It's good to include it as the first char to improve readability a bit. Let me explain by example:

    [-a-z0-9&%] matches a hyohen, a-z letters, 0-9 numbers, an ampersand, and a percent.

    [a-z0-9&-%] matches the same, but at first glance looks like it matches symbols between & and %, which doesn't make sense. 😛
  • 2
    @Ashkin yeah, me too, I find hard to find a case with 2-256 characters
  • 2
    @Cyanite it is not a programming language, it is a regular expression. They can be used on all of those languages, although that one has js sintaxis
  • 1
    @Ashkin it looks a bit like a bad way to match urls. Without http://www.
  • 1
    This matches a script path of size 2 to 256 with an extension of size 2 to 4, followed by a parameter starting with a /.
    The regexp extracts the first param, it actually makes no sense.
  • 1
    @daintycode there's a \b here which is a word separator, can't be a URL
  • 2
    @matanl the \b thing made me curious either. Especially because there is only one. Which doesn't really make sense.
  • 1
    @Ashkin I'd have thought the first hyphen needed to be escaped with \ so it doesn't look like a malformed range. Learn something everyday 🙃
  • 2
    @eldamir in scripting languages nothing is malformed if in some alien way it could work, take javascript for example
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