4
fiftyhz
50d

I feel like I need a slap in the face here: My team can’t agree on a platform for our apps (Windows/.Net or Linux/Java Middleware/Java). So we have apps all over the place, and our team is fractured. Support is a mess, and I’m caught in the middle because I’m the only one willing to try to keep all these systems upgraded (our infrastructure team refuses to work with anyone except me on our team because I just shut up about my platform beliefs and get work done). I’ve pitched trying .Net core on Linux although I know very little about that. We have no technical challenges that require one platform over another - these are simple business apps. I think our architects should force one platform. Am I nuts? Maybe it’s time to look for another career if this is the new norm.

Comments
  • 1
    Neither of them, move to Linux + python or Golang and away from .net/java. Your customer will thank you(i personally would be first)

    Windows and their shit only benefits Microsoft, while Java is just a galactic mess specially in recent years(log4shit, springy the bloat by vmfuck sorry VMrip(vmware, die suckers))
  • 1
    @max19931 Good points, a shift in perspective is what we need as a team. I used to get a lot of joy out of creating software, but now it feels like I’m just fighting frameworks all day long.
  • 1
    Are you a tech leader/PM/CTO? If not it's not your job to either keep this shit together or try to find a compromise.

    @max19931 this way you'll just get more fragmentation. https://xkcd.com/927/
  • 5
    Linux will forever be a second class platform for Microsoft, so don't rely on their tools too much.
  • 5
    linux/.net - obviously.
  • 3
    @dmonkey I don’t have any titles that indicate I’m a leader, but I’ve become the “de facto” team lead because our manager has something like 40 direct reports and our architects are overwhelmed. I made the mistake of being the guy that figured out how to move a bunch of apps from an old AIX system over to Linux, and so know I’m the infrastructure guy for all platforms somehow. No good deed goes unpunished.
  • 0
    @fiftyhz Idk can't you ask at leasr for a raise? Sounds you're keeping too much stuff together for your position. Also this fragmentation in tech stack should be managed from a manager, especially if the teams can't agree by themselves.
  • 1
    @dmonkey Yeah, very much agree. I’ve been working on my approach to my managers about this very thing.
  • 2
    @fiftyhz

    It's a managers job...

    ... But if you have a bit of spare time and you at least use a consistent build tool per language:

    Just aggregate the major version of Java / Dot.Net, the major frameworks and the number of dependencies per project.

    Then write as a summary:

    We currently support all these different stacks with different versioning and dependencies.

    The time necessary for maintenance, transfer of knowledge and team interoperability suffers as there is no common ground.

    --

    Then add maybe a few sentences about what makes most sense based on your analysis - wether it's JDK or .Net.

    I'd usually go with the stack that is most common, but one can argue in any direction.
  • 1
    Oh.

    https://endoflife.date

    Add the EOL of Java / .NET

    Most likely you have some versions of JDK (worst JDK 8) which are already EOL and won't be supported for long.

    Always nice to have as a reason for migration: If it's dead, it's dead - as it might not be supported in an current OS.
  • 2
    Just switch to JS and make everything browser based pogchamp
  • 1
    @IntrusionCM never know this site exists.

    Fun to track if any used Software is listed there.

    But some programs are not listed like Chrome.
  • 1
    @max19931 it's primary audience are framework / languages...

    Chrome is a browser. ;)
  • 2
    Linux + .Net if you already have the skill sets. Tools are good whether you choose visual studio, visual studio code, or JetBrains Rider.
    IMO MS are shifting to Linux being their primary target for .Net because it’s the way that azure and other cloud services have gone, and that’s why they’ve spent so much money developing .net core
  • 1
    Linux and .net6 is good
  • 1
    Ok bro I didn't even read the whole post but the first line I should say come to my house for the slap on your fucking face 🤣🤣
  • 0
    @salshamz hahahaha!
  • 1
    Linux/.net in backend. Whatever makes you happy in frontend although I would say linux here as well. MS♥️linux. Choose your design patterns across the teams/domains and stick with it.

    Automate everything. Everything! Did I say everything? Focus on robustness and resilience. Measure everything so you can talk about it.
  • 1
    @sideshowbob76 MS♥️Linux as long as they get bugfixes to core functionality from the community without having to open source the proprietary extensions that make the thing even remotely competitive. Basically, by using their stuff you get to depend on popular interest (without which the open source foundation rots) and Microsoft's execs (who can pull the plug at any point without explanation) at the same time.
  • 0
    @lbfalvy MS is pretty big. Many teams do amazing things. Other, not so much. All in all, I truly believe MS is a pretty good place. 🤷🏼‍♂️
  • 1
    @sideshowbob76 MS, like all companies, purely exists to make profit. The way they choose to do this depends on various things, but nothing ever happens unless it can be demonstrated to somehow improve their profits (or PR or other stuff that also improves profits). For example, VSCode may be free, C# may be free, but Microsoft's C# extension for VSCode is not only nonfree but it doesn't work with an unofficial build, meaning that the only verison of the free VSCode MS allows you to write free C# in is MS' official release.
  • 1
    @max19931 wtf is golang you commie ? Agree with away from java
  • 0
    @lbfalvy shame too Linux remains a better os
  • 1
    @lbfalvy all we had to do was pray ans believe and rant and our dreams came true except vs or ssms being ported !
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